All posts related to "brain"

Centre for Brain Health: Walk10Blocks Makes it Easier for Sedentary Adults to Get Moving

Thank you to the Centre for Brain Health for publishing an article about the Walk10Blocks app. Let’s start walking!

Below is an excerpt from the Centre for Brain Health:

WALK10BLOCKS MAKES IT EASIER FOR SEDENTARY ADULTS TO GET MOVING

“Exercise” as a concept can be hard to wrap your head around – how much is enough? How do you know you’re doing it correctly? And how do you begin? Fortunately, a new app promises to put older adults on the right path. By walking just ten blocks (roughly one kilometer) per day, app users will meet their daily activity goals; they’ll also find the support, tools and tips they need to keep going.

Walk10Blocks was a collaborative effort inspired by the research of Dr. Teresa Liu-Ambrose(Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health and the Centre for Hip Health & Mobility) and Dr. Linda Li (Arthritis Research Canada). The idea to develop an app as a way of driving awareness around the cognitive and joint health benefits of walking – and to use mobile technology to collect research data in a new way – came from Knowledge User Team lead Arthritis Consumer Experts, and its partners, the Alzheimer Society of BC, and the Canadian Association of Retired Persons.

Scientific guidance from Drs. Liu-Ambrose and Li, along with leading physiotherapy researchers, and digital tech leadership from the Centre for Digital Media, ensured that the Walk10Blocks app was not only user friendly, but would help advance research into cognitive and joint health in a meaningful way.

“Our advice to start with ten blocks is meant to give people a concrete first step, so to speak, towards daily physical activity,” says Dr. Liu-Ambrose. “We wanted to give users a straightforward goal to start, which they would be able to confidently build on. Research shows that walking just ten blocks per day can have neuroprotective benefits as many as nine years later – Walk10Blocks makes it easy to take the first steps toward improved cognition and joint and cardiovascular health.”

“The magic ingredients of the Walk10Blocks app project are its user driven conceptualization and design paired with hard science,” says Cheryl Koehn, Founder and President of Arthritis Consumer Experts, Canada’s largest arthritis patient organization. “The Walk10Blocks app is the first that uses Apple’s ResearchKit platform and pairs user-designed features with a research study, giving the user health benefits long after the study is concluded. I think that’s a really important part of this project: helping sedentary people start walking and practicing healthy behaviour.”

Recent research from Dr. Liu-Ambrose showed that exercising – including walking – just three hours per week may help preserve memory function in older adults with existing cognitive impairments.

For more information about Walk10Blocks, visit walk10blocks.caDownload Walk10Blocks for free from the App Store.

This research was made possible through funding from Improving Cognitive & jOint health Network(ICON), a CIHR knowledge translation catalyst network. 

Explore the role of exercise on physical and brain health

Picture of people walking on a sidewalkA free workshop by Aging, Mobility, and Cognitive Neuroscience Lab

Explore the role of exercise on physical and brain health with professional experts Drs. Steven Blair, Kirk Erickson, and Brian Saelens. The doctors will be sharing their research on the physical and cognitive health benefits of physical activity in today’s society.

Space is limited so please register by April 29, 2016!

Date: Friday, May 6, 2016
Time: 3pm-5pm
Location: University Centre (UBC), 6331 Crescent Road, Sage East (Main Level)
*Registration opens at 2:30pm. Light refreshments will be provided.

About the speakers
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Research shows arthritis medication may slow Alzheimer’s

Brain xrayA recent research from the University of Southampton shows that the arthritis medication, etanarcept (Enbrel®), may slow Alzheimer’s disease. The research was presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Denmark last week.

In the small control study, a group of 41 patients exhibiting mild or moderate Alzheimer’s was given either the anti-inflammatory medication etanercept or a placebo every week over a period of six months.

Researchers monitored memory function in patients and found that the efficiency of day-to-day activities and behaviour and the symptoms of those who had taken etanercept did not get any worse. In comparison, the placebo group showed signs of decline in memory function.

In an interview with the Daily Mail, lead researcher, Professor Clive Holmes, said:

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