All posts related to "communications"

It’s time to see your rheumatologist. Let’s record and take notes!

Picture of smartphone and journal with pen for taking notesIt’s time to see your rheumatologist and specialist. Please have your recorder, pens and paper ready.

A study published in Psychological Science provides two hypotheses as to why note-taking is beneficial in a classroom setting. The first hypothesis is called encoding hypothesis, which says that when a person is taking notes, “the processing that occurs” will improve “learning and retention.” The second hypothesis is called the external-storage hypothesis – you learn by being able to look back at your notes, or even the notes of other people.

The same concepts can be applied to your medical appointments and is currently practiced by Dr. James Ryan, a family physician in Ludington, Michigan. With his patients’ approval, Dr. Ryan records their appointments, then uploads the audio file to a secure web platform for his patients. The recordings are annotated so that patients can easily search for specific topics in the conversation. Patients will be empowered and engaged in their own healthcare because they will have a reference of what was discussed. They can give family members access to the recordings as well.

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Study shows that when care quality goes down, lupus damage goes up

An image with different medical and health icons

Image courtesy of digital art at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

According to findings from a recent study, poor patient-provider communication and care coordination result in increased damage in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). If you would like to learn more about how to best communicate with your rheumatologist and physician, please visit JointHealth™ Education and take Lesson 1: The Art of communicating with your rheumatologist.

The research, titled “Relationship Between Process of Care and a Subsequent Increase in Damage in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus” was published in Arthritis Care & Research. The team wanted to understand how data from the Lupus Outcome Study could be used to evaluate healthcare interactions and subsequent accumulation of damage by the disease over two years.

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