All posts related to "diagnosis"

Juvenile arthritis on CBC

Today on CBC Radio One, Mark Forsythe with the B.C. Almanac spoke to pediatric rheumatologist of B.C. Children’s Hospital, Dr. Lori Tucker, about juvenile arthritis. Dr. Tucker was joined by 20-year old Andrea, who has lived with arthritis since she was two, and her mother, Kathy.

The interviews were conducted during the second half of the hour long program (at 23:35 minutes on the podcast).

Photo courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

Rare forms of arthritis

In this JointHealth™ workshop, Dr. Antonio Aviña-Zubieta, rheumatologist and Research Scientist with the Arthritis Research Centre of Canada (ARC), is interviewed about systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs).

In this web workshop, Dr. Aviña-Zubieta:

  • Talks about rare forms of arthritis
  • Explains what makes SARDs difficult to diagnose
  • Gives advice about what to do if you are diagnosed with a SARD
  • Discusses the isolation people may feel when diagnosed with a SARD
  • Provides a list of potential resources

This web workshop will be of interest to those diagnosed with a rare form of arthritis or SARD, and their friends and family.

Please let us know what you think about this web workshop by emailing feedback@jointhealth.org.

People with arthritis are “heroes” – Meet Gerey

Arthritis presents many challenges to everyday activities that most people take for granted, like getting dressed or cooking a meal. Adversity can foster great strength too. People who live with arthritis are “heroes” because in spite of their pain, disability, and fatigue, they still go to work, raise their children, care for elderly parents, maintain relationships with friends and spouses, and for the sake of emotional and physical health continue to participate in hobbies and exercise.

Sharing the challenges—and triumphs—of living with arthritis can help empower others with the disease, so we asked people to submit their story of living with arthritis.

Meet Gerey Parker of Richmond, BC:
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People with arthritis are “heroes” – Meet Davis

Arthritis presents many challenges to everyday activities that most people take for granted, like getting dressed or cooking a meal. Adversity can foster great strength too. People who live with arthritis are “heroes” because in spite of their pain, disability, and fatigue, they still go to work, raise their children, care for elderly parents, maintain relationships with friends and spouses, and for the sake of emotional and physical health continue to participate in hobbies and exercise.

Sharing the challenges—and triumphs—of living with arthritis can help empower others with the disease, so we asked people to submit their story of living with arthritis.

Meet Davis Barton of Kingston, Ontario:

 

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People with arthritis are “heroes” – Bonnie

Arthritis presents many challenges to everyday activities that most people take for granted, like getting dressed or cooking a meal. Adversity can foster great strength too. People who live with arthritis are “heroes” because in spite of their pain, disability, and fatigue, they still go to work, raise their children, care for elderly parents, maintain relationships with friends and spouses, and for the sake of emotional and physical health continue to participate in hobbies and exercise.

Sharing the challenges—and triumphs—of living with arthritis can help empower others with the disease, so we asked people to submit their story of living with arthritis.

Meet Bonnie from Ontario: Continue reading

Have you heard of Sjögren’s syndrome?

These days, chances are . . . yes. Rare forms of autoimmune arthritis usually don’t get a lot of attention—so rare, that it can take years of visits to various doctors to receive a diagnosis—but when Venus Williams had to drop out of the U.S. Open tennis championship, suddenly Sjögren’s syndrome, at least, got noticed. To help raise awareness about this disease, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) produced a fact sheet, which we have included here.

Sjogrens_ACR Fact Sheet

Read more: Sjögren’s Syndrome Moves into the Spotlight, July 2012 issue of The Rheumatologist

People with arthritis are “heroes” – Linda Olbort, Saskatoon, SK

Arthritis presents many challenges to everyday activities that most people take for granted, like getting dressed or cooking a meal. Adversity can foster great strength too. People who live with arthritis are “heroes” because in spite of their pain, disability, and fatigue, they still go to work, raise their children, care for elderly parents, maintain relationships with friends and spouses, and for the sake of emotional and physical health continue to participate in hobbies and exercise.

Sharing the challenges—and triumphs—of living with arthritis can help empower others with the disease, so we asked people to submit their story of living with arthritis.

Meet Linda Olbort of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan: Continue reading

New genes linked to osteoarthritis

In two studies that compared thousands of people with and without osteoarthritis (OA), researchers discovered 8 new genes linked to the disease. Because OA is very complex—there are many more genes associated with the disease that have to be discovered—there is still no way to predict who will get it or how severe onset would be. However, the findings could lead to new treatment options.

Read more: Rebecca Smith, Medical Editor, The Telegraph, July 2012

Competing to Raise Awareness: Ankylosing Spondylitis

Helgi Olafson is training to become a triathlete. Every week he bike rides 200 miles, runs 50 miles, and paddles 25 miles to train for that goal. He lives with ankylosing spondylitis. Last month, he ran the Kona Marathon, to raise awareness of this disease that affects 1 in 200 people.

Running the 26.2 miles in just under 4 hours, he placed 5th in his age category and 55th out of a total of 450 marathoners. Well done, Helgi!

Read about Helgi’s story on “The Faces of Ankylosing Spondylitis” or on his own blog, “Helgi Olafson: Road to Ironman” where you can get his thoughts leading up to the marathon and after.