All posts related to "exercise"

JointHealth™ express – What has ACE done for you lately?

Here’s what we’ve been working on this summer.

Flip Calendar AugustWork Plan 2015/2016

ACE has set ambitious goals for its 2015/2016 Work Plan. Our five primary work areas will deliver high impact consumer and public formulary information, programming, advocacy and private payer education across Canada.

JointHealth™ shareables

ACE has released its first two JointHealth™ shareables, featuring Private Health Insurance in Canada and Subsequent Entry Biologics (SEBs) on jointhealth.org. Continue reading

Hannah Coulthurst – Arthritis and table tennis champ

Table tennis racquet and ball

Image courtesy of Antpkr at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Hannah Coulthurst, a volunteer with Arthritis Care UK, was diagnosed with chronic idiopathic arthritis in 2003 at the young age of eight. Since her diagnosis, she has been a full time wheelchair user. Despite her diagnose, she never gave up on her passion for sports. In search for a sport that she can participate in, she discovered table tennis and started training in 2007. She trains regularly with the Great Britain squad in Sheffield and represented Great Britain at the Commonwealth Games in Delhi in 2010.

Hannah is pursuing her dream of participating in the Brazil Paralympics Games in 2016. To thank Hannah for her inspiration and in celebration of the table tennis events happening at the Toronto PanAm Games, today’s #ABNPhotoADay features table tennis.

Hannah is currently a psychology student at the University of Hull. In 2013, she was profiled by Arthritis Care UK. Below is Hannah’s story from the interview:

My name is Hannah. I was diagnosed with Chronic Idiopathic Arthritis at the age of eight after spending seven weeks in hospital. Recently I have also been diagnosed with Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy as well. I am now 18 years old and have been using a wheelchair for the past 10 years.  Continue reading

Pan Am a day, ABN Photo a Day – Hiking

“Canada is a vast, scenic country that offers some of the best hiking in the world. From the ancient rainforests of British Columbia…the foothills and mountains of Alberta…the Niagara Escarpment Biosphere and the Northern Ontario wilderness…the Appalachian Trail in Gaspe…to the coastal beauty of the Eastern provinces…there are hiking trails for every skill and fitness level.” – Discover Canadian Outdoors

HikingAs a British Columbian, I am, of course sharing a picture of a hike I did with my friends at Garibaldi Lake hiking trail. This particular trial was 18 km long and took 6 hours to complete (roundtrip) – taking into consideration we took a nice dip and swim in the glacier water of Garibaldi Lake. This was a more strenuous hike but there are many other trails to discover on Parks Canada’s website.

Hiking and Arthritis

When we asked Dr. Julia Alleyne, the Chief Medical Officer for Team Canada during the 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games in Toronto, what sports she would recommend for people living with arthritis, she replied, “Any sports that involve both upper and lower extremities are good for people with arthritis. Sports with low impact on the joints such as water aerobics, aqua fitness, hiking, swimming, and golfing can be beneficial to someone living with arthritis.” Continue reading

Runners, on your mark…get set…go!

Woman jogging on trailRunning is a popular form of exercise in Canada – be it along the sea wall, in the park, or at the gym. Today the research suggests that aerobic activity is great for becoming and maintaining fitness and health. Many people believe that running can worsen or be one of the underlying causes of osteoarthritis. A new study puts this fear at ease.

According to an article on Arthritis Digest, “A recent research presented at the Osteoarthritis Research Society International World Congress showed that people aged over 50 years old with osteoarthritis who ran on a regular basis did not have any increase in pain, or radiographic structural progression, over the four-year study.” Continue reading

Risk factors of osteoporosis

Picture of Milk and BreadOsteoporosis is a disease characterized by low bone mass and deterioration of bone quality. This results in bones becoming thin and weak, which increases the risk of fracture as they are easy to break. It is known as the “silent thief” because bone loss occurs without any symptoms. In fact, often it is not until someone fractures a wrist, spine, rib, or hip that osteoporosis is suspected (and often it is missed even after a fragility fracture).

As many as two million Canadians have osteoporosis. One in four women, including a third of women aged 60-70 years and two thirds of women aged 80 years and older, will be diagnosed with osteoporosis.

Research shows that weight-bearing exercise, including soccer, is an effective way to reduce the amount of bone loss over time and preserve bone mass, and thus, reduce your likelihood of developing osteoporosis and having a fracture. To prepare for the FIF Women’s World Cup™ this weekend and Father’s Day, #TeamArthritis challenges you to do something that reduce your chance of getting osteoporosis.

Continue reading

FIFA 11+ : Preventing osteoarthritis by preventing injuries in youth

FIFA 11+ Team

Photo from: http://f-marc.com/11plus/home/

FIFA 11+ : Preventing osteoarthritis by preventing injuries in youth

The FIFA Women’s World Cup™ is here in Canada and causing excitement across the country. Our youth will see the best female soccer players in the world take their places on the field to play the “beautiful” game. Soccer in Canada has one of the largest participation rates in youth. However, there is a downside – injury – especially of the knee and ankle. Knee and ankle injury rate in soccer are significant for both boys and girls, with girls up to 8 times more likely to have an injury. Injuries cause pain and disability and can lead to long-term consequences – osteoarthritis (OA). Sports injuries are one of the leading causes of developing osteoarthritis later in life which results in daily pain and suffering for millions of people across Canada. Many people with OA can remember the injury that started their knee or ankle problems. Continue reading