All posts related to "exercise"

Include exercise in your mall routine

Picture of a woman holding onto a shopping bagThere are many ways to include exercise in your mall routine. By turning daily tasks into an exercise routine, you will be able to improve your overall strength. Many Canadians visit the mall on December 26, also known as Boxing Day in Canada, to find deals on electronic, clothing, and entertainment goods and services. Like the Black Friday sale event down in the United States, the shopping centres are packed with people. The mall also provides a free and dry environment for walking when the weather makes road conditions unsafe for outdoor exercise. Below are some ways you can incorporate and optimize exercise while shopping: Continue reading

ACR News: Exercise for Arthritis

Today at the ACR annual meeting, attendees at a symposium on the benefits of exercise heard presenters encourage arthritis patients to include physical activity into their treatment, something that was unheard of at a meeting like this 20 years ago.

A picture of people's legs walking on a cross walkDr. Vilet Vlieland, Professor in the Department of Orthopaedics, Rehabilitation and Physical Therapy at Leiden University Medical Centre in the Netherlands, said it’s important for an experienced therapist to implement tailor-made exercise programs for arthritis patients, consisting of routine and planned activities, monitored by regular assessments.
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Is your sport likely to result in arthritis?

Arthritis: A woman doing ribbon gymnasticsRio 2016 concluded Sunday with Canada winning 4 gold medals, 3 silver medals, and 15 bronze medals. Athletes in the Olympics are passionate about the sport they love and have devoted their life to training and excelling in their sport. We should be reminded that the display of skills and excellence, though as entertaining and thrilling as they are to spectators, could result in arthritis for the athletes down the road as injuries progresses and frequency of injuries increase. In light of this, Arthritis Olympic Village would love to thank all the athletes who participated in the Olympic games. Your selfless, determined, and passionate attitude towards the sport you love is an inspiration to us all. Continue reading

Football: How to prevent injuries and build muscles

As football (soccer) approaches the medals round in Rio 2016, Arthritis Olympic Village wants to share some tips on how to prevent injuries and build muscles in this sport. The first component is to observe your form while you warm up. It will help to record yourself warming up, such as jogging for a couple of meters.

Sports Without InjuryPreventing injuries - Picture of a feet about to hit a football suggest you observe the following:

  • Watch to make sure your hip, knee and ankle are in a straight line.
  • Don’t let your knee cave in or your feet whip out to the side.
  • Don’t let your toes point toward each other.
  • You may also want to learn to strike the ground with the front of your foot, but it’s important to build up your calf strength first.
  • Shuffle sideways and run backwards and observe how you bend at the knees and hips

In the video above, former U.S. national midfielder Cobi Jones demonstrates proper backward and forward running form.

It is important for a football player to develop muscle strength in their quadriceps, hamstrings, hip muscles, gluteus and core muscles. These muscle groups will help protect your knees, ankles, groins, feet, calves, shins, Achilles tendons and everything below the waist.

Sports without Injury provide a good example of exercises you can do in the respective muscle.

  1. Hamstrings – This exercise, called the Nordic (or Russian) hamstring exercise not only strengthens the hamstrings, it strengthens their ability to do the eccentric contractions they make to balance the concentric contractions the quadriceps make.
  2. Core – An advantage of these core-building exercises is that they strengthen the muscles in the trunk without stressing the lower back.
  3. Hips – Hips move in multiple directions, and these exercises capture most of them.

Doing muscle strengthening exercises two or three times a week will make physical activity easier and more enjoyable. Please note not all of the above exercises may be suitable for someone living with arthritis. Always consult your doctor before starting a new exercise treatment plan.

American boxer James “The Cinderella Man” Braddock’s fight with arthritis

James J. Braddock, “The Cinderella Man” is an Irish American boxer who held the world heavyweight championships from 1935 to 1937. Braddock was famous for his powerful right hand and persevering through personal ups and downs, which included having to work at the docks during the Great Depression and having to switch his technique due to arthritis that developed in his hands as a result of injuries throughout his career.

A boxer in his arenaAlthough Braddock eventually retired due to his arthritis, he never once gave up. When pain and stiffness became especially bad in his dominant right hand, he retrained to make his left arm the stronger one. Braddock’s career highlight includes winning the fight with John “Corn” Griffin, the “Ozark Cyclone” and heavyweight contender, Art Lasky. On June 13, 1935, Braddock played one of the most memorable matches in boxing history – winning the heavyweight championship of the world against the then World Heavyweight Champion, Max Baer, as the 10-to-1 underdog. Above is a video recap of the boxing match captured by BoxingMemories.comContinue reading

Phil Mickelson misses Rio 2016 but swings psoriatic arthritis into remission

A golfer taking a swing on a golf course - psoriatic arthritisProfessional golfer Phil Mickelson was diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis in 2010. At first, his joints ached and then one day, he could barely get out of bed due to agonizing pain. While he waited for test results from his rheumatologist, he played in the 2010 U.S. Open and landed a fourth place finish.

If untreated, psoriatic arthritis can affect Mickelson’s golf game. The swelling of the hands and toes can affect his ability to stabilize his swing and stance. Swelling in the hands can also affect how he grips his club. With the help of medications, Mickelson is back in the game. Off the golf course, he is a vocal advocate of raising awareness for arthritis.  Continue reading