All posts related to "Health Canada"

Health Canada approves sarilumab (Kevzara®) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

Approved stamps for sarilumab for rheumatoid arthritis

Image courtesy of karate at FreeDigitalPhotos.net/

Sarilumab (Kevzara®) is now approved in Canada to treat moderate to severely active rheumatoid arthritis

Health Canada has approved a new treatment for Canadians with moderate to severely active rheumatoid arthritis. Sarilumab (Kevzara®) was issued its Notice of Compliance on January 12, 2017. Click here to view Health Canada’s Summary Basis of Decision.

Sarilumab (Kevzara®), an interleukin-6 receptor antagonist, has been approved for the treatment of adult patients with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis who have had an inadequate reponse or intolerance to one or more biologic or non-biologic Disease-Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs (DMARDs).
Continue reading

Attention ACE members with psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis

An image of PureCare Herbal CreamHealth Canada has issued a warning about ingredients in PureCare Herbal Cream 

PureCare Herbal Cream, advertised as a natural treatment for eczema and psoriasis in children and babies, may pose serious health risks.

Health Canada testing confirmed the presence of a prescription steroid (clobetasol propionate) and another ingredient (phenoxylethanol) not declared on the product label. These ingredients may cause health effects ranging from skin irritation and dehydration to increased blood pressure. Continue reading

Survival tools for a cold and damp winter for people living with arthritis

Arthritis can affect people all year round; however, the winter and wet weather months can make it harder to manage arthritis symptoms. Climate change can increase pain to joints.

According to Robert Jamison, Professor at the Harvard Medical School and chief psychologist at the Pain Management Center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Chestnut Hill, the increased pain is caused by a change in barometric pressure. Jamison explains the impact of barometric pressure on the body by comparing it to a balloon: “When a balloon is inflated, it has the maximum inside and outside pressure. High barometric pressure that pushes against the body from the outside keeps tissues from expanding. As the barometric pressure fails, tissues in the body may expand. As the tissues expand, they put more pressure on nerves that control pain signals.”

There are several ways to survive the cold. Firstly, take care of your own health by getting a flu vaccine. Health Canada states the following:

The best way to prevent the flu is by getting a flu vaccine, also known as a flu shot. Flu vaccine is safe and effective. You cannot get the flu from the flu vaccine. Most people do not have reactions to the flu vaccine. Severe reactions are rare.

Getting a flu vaccine is a simple action that can save lives by:

  • protecting you if you are exposed to the virus
  • preventing you from getting very sick
  • helping protect other people because you are less likely to spread the virus to others

Health Canada Flu Poster Continue reading