All posts related to "healthcare"

Study shows that when care quality goes down, lupus damage goes up

An image with different medical and health icons

Image courtesy of digital art at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

According to findings from a recent study, poor patient-provider communication and care coordination result in increased damage in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). If you would like to learn more about how to best communicate with your rheumatologist and physician, please visit JointHealth™ Education and take Lesson 1: The Art of communicating with your rheumatologist.

The research, titled “Relationship Between Process of Care and a Subsequent Increase in Damage in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus” was published in Arthritis Care & Research. The team wanted to understand how data from the Lupus Outcome Study could be used to evaluate healthcare interactions and subsequent accumulation of damage by the disease over two years.

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Patient experiences of rheumatoid arthritis models of care: An international survey

As part of an international network of RA patient organizations, Arthritis Consumer Experts invites you to participate in a global survey of RA patients to examine the diagnosis, treatment and care they receive for their RA. The goal of this survey is to understand, from the patient experience and perspective, how current “models of care” for rheumatoid arthritis compare between countries.

Global RA Network Survey BannerYour experience and perspective matter

As a person living with RA, sharing your experiences about the care you receive is vitally important. With your help, we can meet the study goals and develop education and information programs to improve patients’ understanding about RA models of care to enable the best treatment outcomes possible in Canada.

How you can participate

If you agree to participate, you will be asked to answer a survey questionnaire, which should take approximately 10 minutes to complete. All the information gathered during the survey will be combined to protect your privacy and anonymity.

To be eligible to participate in this survey, you must:

  • Be 18 years of age or older
  • Receive health care in Canada
  • Have access to the internet

Thank you for considering our request to participate in this survey. Your participation will help you and other people living with RA in your country know more about the health care they should be receiving.

Please click here to complete the survey.

#CRArthritis Speaker’s Corner – The road to become a rheumatologist

A screen capture of Cheryl Koehn and future rheumatologist Kelsey ChomistekIn 2008, a rheumatology workforce analysis report published by the American College of Rheumatology Workforce Study Advisory Group concluded:

Based on assessment of supply and demand under current scenarios, the demand for rheumatologists is expected to exceed supply in the coming decades. Strategies for the profession to adapt to this changing health care landscape include increasing the number of fellows each year, utilizing physician assistants and nurse practitioners in greater numbers, and improving practice efficiency.

Fast forward to 2015

The 2015 ACR/ARHP Workforce Study of Rheumatology Specialists in the United States projects a shortage of 3,845 rheumatologists in the U.S. by 2025, an increase from the 2005 ACR Workforce Study, which projected a shortage of 2,576 rheumatologists. Reasons for the shortage include: Continue reading

Is ‘Big Data’ a big deal for healthcare in Canada?

A survey to learn what people think about the use of large data sets for research purposes

PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY:
Big Data, in health care, is large and complex sets of data that have information routinely collected on patients’ health and their use of health care systems.

The purpose of this study is to understand the public’s knowledge and opinions about the use of Big Data in Canadian health research. This includes:

  • Current level of knowledge about Big Data;
  • Willingness to participate in projects using Big Data;
  • Major concerns about the use of Big Data;
  • Interest in learning more about research using Big Data;
  • Preferred modes of receiving more information about Big Data

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Concerned citizens speak out about Vancouver’s 10th Avenue Corridor Project

A picture of Vancouver's 10th AvenueNew bike lane could impact people living with arthritis and other disabilities

An online petition for people who are concerned about the City of Vancouver’s proposed 10th Avenue Corridor Project is open for signatures until December 12, 2016. The petition has been started by a group on behalf of clients, staff and patient advocates of the various medical centres along the Health Precinct area (from Cambie Street to Oak Street).

The group argues that there is an increased risk to the safety of patients and public coming into and leaving the Health Precinct area, including the Mary Pack Arthritis and Eye Care Centres. Easy and safe access for elderly, mentally, physically, sight and hearing challenged patients is critical to providing the kind and quality of care they need.

“Fundamentally, bike lanes are an important part of Vancouver’s desire to be a world class ‘green’ city, which we fully support,” says Cheryl Koehn, person with rheumatoid arthritis and Founder and President of Arthritis Consumer Experts. “But increasing congestion of both bikes and cars through several city blocks where patients are struggling to get from point A to point B is simply poorly thought out.”

To read more about the 10th Avenue Corridor Project, please click here.

ACR News: A more human(ities) approach to arthritis healthcare

Picture of a painting with flowers on itThe humanities come in many forms – literature, music, art, drama – and provide us perspective on what it means to be human. They can also provide benefits for patients and their healthcare professionals, said American College of Rheumatology (ACR) annual meeting keynote speaker, Dr. Paulette Hahn, Associate Professor of Medicine and Associate Vice Chair of Education in the Department of Medicine at the University of Florida.

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