All posts related to "Indigenous"

Dr. Cheryl Barnabe – Champion of arthritis care and research in Indigenous communities

Arthritis Broadcast Network had the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Cheryl Barnabe at a #CRArthritis event, a champion of arthritis care and research in Indigenous communities. In this interview, Dr. Cheryl Barnabe, Assistant Professor at the Division of Rheumatology at the University of Calgary, shares with us information from her workshop “Investigating access to arthritis health services for Aboriginal people: A Framework for System Reform”.

Rheumatoid arthritis affects about 1% of the Canadian population or 1 out of every 100 people. This increases to 5% for aboriginal Canadians. This population not only is at greater risk for getting RA but the disease is more severe than with other populations. For aboriginal people rheumatoid arthritis is one of the five top five chronic diseases reported. More Canadian women get RA then men (3:1), however, this figure almost doubles for aboriginal women.

A study conducted by the National Aboriginal Health Organization (NAHO) 2002, by First Nations people for First Nations people, had approximately 22,000 participants making up 238 communities, both on-reserve and off-reserve First Nations people across Canada.

The following highlights some of the results of the study:

  • arthritis is one of the five top conditions to affect the First Nations population
  • more than half (52%) of First Nations adults with disabilities reported having arthritis compared to 14.6% without disabilities
  • 25.3% of First Nations adults have arthritis compared to 19.1% of the general Canadian population
  • there is a higher rate of arthritis among First Nations women compared to other women in Canada, except for women over 60 years of age. The following chart shows the range of difference between these two groups with more than double the First Nations women with arthritis compared to other Canadian women up to age 39 years.

Dr. Barnabe is also a past recipient of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research’s (CIHR) Foundation Grant. Below is the description of the award on the CIHR website:

Developing a more complete picture of arthritis in Indigenous communities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Most people aren’t aware that women and Indigenous people are at a much higher risk for arthritis, and that kids can get arthritis too.” — Dr. Cheryl Barnabe

CIHR Foundation Grant Recipient

Dr. Cheryl Barnabe
Cumming School of Medicine
University of Calgary

Dr. Barnabe’s Research

Dr. Cheryl Barnabe, a Métis clinician and researcher at the University of Calgary, is exploring why arthritis appears to disproportionately affect Indigenous communities, and what can be done to reduce these disparities. Continue reading

Indigenous children expresses pain through art

The Aboriginal Children’s Hurt and Healing Initiative wanted to answer one simple question: What does pain look like? Not what it feels like, but what pain would look it if you had to express it on paper, or in this case, canvas.

In an interview with CBC News, John Sylliboy, community research co-ordinator with the Aboriginal Children’s Hurt and Healing Initiative, said: “Aboriginal children feel and experience pain just like anyone else. It’s just that they express their pain very differently. They don’t necessarily verbalize their pain, or they don’t express it outwardly through crying or through pain grimaces. A lot of kids, they just suck it up. That’s what they say all the time. ‘We just suck it up.'”

The research study spawned in 2008 when Margot Latimer, a clinical scientist at the Centre for Pediatric Pain Research at the IWK Health Centre in Halifax, observed there was no First Nations youth being referred to their pain clinic at the IWK hospital.

One of the paintings from the children

“My painting is about pain and the black represents how she feels inside. But she has like this white kind of atmosphere and it separates it from her pain.” – Artist, 16-year-old
Source: http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/aboriginal-youth-art-pain-hurt-healing-1.3852646?cmp=rss

Continue reading