All posts related to "joints"

American boxer James “The Cinderella Man” Braddock’s fight with arthritis

James J. Braddock, “The Cinderella Man” is an Irish American boxer who held the world heavyweight championships from 1935 to 1937. Braddock was famous for his powerful right hand and persevering through personal ups and downs, which included having to work at the docks during the Great Depression and having to switch his technique due to arthritis that developed in his hands as a result of injuries throughout his career.

A boxer in his arenaAlthough Braddock eventually retired due to his arthritis, he never once gave up. When pain and stiffness became especially bad in his dominant right hand, he retrained to make his left arm the stronger one. Braddock’s career highlight includes winning the fight with John “Corn” Griffin, the “Ozark Cyclone” and heavyweight contender, Art Lasky. On June 13, 1935, Braddock played one of the most memorable matches in boxing history – winning the heavyweight championship of the world against the then World Heavyweight Champion, Max Baer, as the 10-to-1 underdog. Above is a video recap of the boxing match captured by BoxingMemories.comContinue reading

Swim for arthritis and cheer on Canada’s swim team at Rio 2016!

People with arthritis should celebrate the success of Canada’s swim team at Rio 2016 by going for a swim.

children swimmingThe Arthritis Research Centre of Canada reports that water provides an excellent medium for exercising. The buoyancy of your body in the water means less weight on the main weight- bearing joints (feet, ankles, knees, and hips) and allow for freer, less painful movement while still providing resistance to muscles. Swimming, combined with the water’s support provides an aerobic workout without putting extra stress on your joints. Similarly, walking through the water in a swimming pool protects joints and lessens possible pain, while providing a workout with 12 times the resistance of walking on land. Continue reading

Arthritis timebomb: Digital gadgets can “wear out” your joints

Image of hand over a computer keyboardTyping, texting, and gaming on digital gadgets are wearing out your joints. The ‘pain after texting’ phenomenon happens in both adults and children and leads to joint and wrist pains. According to hand surgeon Dr. Mark Ciaglia of Woodlands Center for Specialty Surgery in Texas, you can develop arthritis if you are excessively texting, emailing, and playing games on your digital devices. In an interview with UK’s Daily Mail, Ciaglia said: “With the advent of texting and video games and excessive use of computers and typing you’re wearing the joints out sooner so we’re actually seeing a shift in the demographics of patients that get the arthritis because they’re wearing their joints out so much sooner.” Continue reading

Jobs that put your joints at risk

A construction workerLabour Day celebrates the achievements of workers. It originated with the labour union movement which called for eight hours for work, eight hours for recreation, and eight hours for rest. It is important that we acknowledge workplace safety, especially for your joints, in order to foster workplace achievements, retain qualified workers, and optimize work productivity.

Certain jobs put your joints at higher risk of getting arthritis, such as those that require you to make the same repetitive motions daily. In an interview with Everyday Health, Erik Gail, MD, professor of clinical medicine in the rheumatology section and interim director of the Arizona Arthritis Center at the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Tucson, said: “Anything that puts unhealthy strains or stresses on the joints can cause arthritis.” Below is a list of jobs that may increase your risk for arthritis if you don’t take the necessary arthritis prevention strategies. Continue reading

CRA Interview Series 2015 – Dr. Mary-Anne Fitzcharles: 101 on Joints for Joints

Canadian Rheumatology Association (CRA) and Allied Health Professions Association (AHPA) Interview Series 2015

Today’s feature interview – Dr. Mary-Anne Fitzcharles: The 101 on Joints for Joints

ABN reporters from Canada’s arthritis consumer organizations interviewed leading health professionals and researchers during last month’s CRA and AHPA annual meetings.

Beginning March 9, feature interviews will be posted on the ABN YouTube channel http://bit.ly/ABNYouTube. Please help us raise awareness about the important work going on in Canada by sharing the interviews with your organizational and social networks.

About Dr. Mary-Anne Fitzcharles

Picture of Mary-Anne FitzcharlesDr. Fitzcharles is currently an associate professor of medicine in the Division of Rheumatology at McGill University. She completed her training in rheumatology at The London Hospital, Whitechapel, London, England. She received her medical education at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. She has been on the faculty at McGill University since 1984, and is a consultant rheumatologist at the McGill Pain Centre. Her past accomplishments include being an examiner for the Royal College of Physicians of Canada Internal Medicine Specialist Examinations for 15 years, a member of Medical Admissions committee for medical students to McGill University for 15 years, and director of postgraduate medical education at Royal Victoria Hospital, and member of postgraduate medical education board of McGill University. In the past 10 years, research interests have been in the area of pain management and alternative treatments use in rheumatic diseases, with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

About medicinal cannabis

Medical cannabis refers to the use of plant material, either whole or in extra form. Medical cannabis contains various cannabinoid molecules such as tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). THC has pain relieving and psychoactive (mind altering) properties. CBD is believed to reduce pain and inflammation without having psychoactive side effects.