All posts related to "juvenile arthritis"

The lastest provincial listings, at your fingertips

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(Please click on the map for more information about the provincial drug formulary updates.)

The latest provincial listings, at your fingertips

Good news for people living with autoimmune arthritis in Canada!

Arthritis Consumer Experts (ACE) maps out the latest news for you: Read about the important changes to provincial drug formularies and what it means for Canadians living with autoimmune arthritis. The changes covered in this update affect people living with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Continue reading

Let BC PharmaCare hear “Your Voice” on canakinumab

Megaphone GraphicBC PharmaCare is looking for your input on canakinumab for the treatment of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA)

Canakinumab (Ilaris®) is now being considered for coverage under the British Columbia Ministry of Health’s PharmaCare program. By filling out a questionnaire on a website called Your Voice, you can provide feedback about canakinumab for the treatment of sJIA.

You can give input if you are a B.C. resident and have sJIA, a caregiver to someone with sJIA, or if your group represents people who live with sJIA.

The input is reviewed by the Drug Benefit Council, which then gives recommendations on whether a medication should be covered, and how, by BC PharmaCare. BC PharmaCare then makes a decision based on those recommendations and available resources. Policies and plans already in place also factor in the decision making process. Continue reading

Canada’s first measures of performance in treating inflammatory arthritis

Performance meterA team of researchers has developed Canada’s first set of systematic measures for tracking how well or poorly health systems are doing in providing services to people who have inflammatory arthritis (IA), a potentially crippling disease that is on the rise in Canada.

The researchers developed six key measures for gauging access to specialist care and initiation of treatment for people with IA, a disease grouping that includes rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis. The work is described in March issue of The Journal of Rheumatology.

People who receive early diagnosis and start of treatment have a better chance of responding well and avoiding permanent joint damage from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the most common form of IA. There is a growing body of evidence that early detection and treatment are also crucial to good outcomes for people who have other types of IA. Continue reading

Quebec’s INESSS wants to hear your comments

Megaphone GraphicQuebec’s INESSS wants to hear your comments on apremilast (Otezla®) and adalimumab (Humira®) 

Do you have psoriatic arthritis or juvenile arthritis or care for someone who does? We need your valuable input.

The National Institute of excellence in health and social services (INESSS) in Quebec is asking health professionals, consumers and patients, and patient groups to submit their comments about apremilast (Otezla®) for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis and adalimumab (Humira®) for the treatment of juvenile arthritis. These medications are being evaluated as part of the 2016 update to the List of Medications.  Continue reading

“It hurts!” cried the little kid with arthritis

Kid on grass crawling with a puzzled lookThe question is, how badly does it hurt?

A recent study conducted to evaluate pain measures developed by the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) under the National Institutes of Health help captured the young patient’s perspective of living with chronic pain. The study addressed the different categories of pain experience and language used by children when they talk about chronic pain. In an interview with the Medical Xpress, researchers identified these as:

  • Pain behaviour – The child initiates he or she becomes irritable or suffers a lack of appetite (or other behaviour) when in pain.
  • Pain interference – The child describes slower movement, such as walking, or lack of energy due to pain interference.
  • Pain quality – The child describes pain as sharp, cutting, dull or achy.

The research study was based on the results of individual and focus group interviews with 32 children and with parents of children with chronic pain, such as those affected by juvenile arthritis, sickle cell anemia, and cerebral palsy. Continue reading

Juvenile arthritis affects the future of the human race

Close up of kids, a boy and girlIn the United States alone, more than 300,000 kids, teens, and young adults live with some form of juvenile arthritis (JA). A recent study conducted by the British Society for Paediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology in the United Kingdom found that the mortality rate is high in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Researchers noted that the death rates are the highest among girls, up to 50 times greater than those from the non-JA population.

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is chronic inflammatory arthritis developing in children under the age of 16 years. Previously called juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), juvenile idiopathic arthritis strikes up to one in 1000 children and is one of the most common chronic diseases among children. Continue reading