All posts related to "juvenile arthritis"

Canada’s first measures of performance in treating inflammatory arthritis

Performance meterA team of researchers has developed Canada’s first set of systematic measures for tracking how well or poorly health systems are doing in providing services to people who have inflammatory arthritis (IA), a potentially crippling disease that is on the rise in Canada.

The researchers developed six key measures for gauging access to specialist care and initiation of treatment for people with IA, a disease grouping that includes rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis. The work is described in March issue of The Journal of Rheumatology.

People who receive early diagnosis and start of treatment have a better chance of responding well and avoiding permanent joint damage from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the most common form of IA. There is a growing body of evidence that early detection and treatment are also crucial to good outcomes for people who have other types of IA. Continue reading

Quebec’s INESSS wants to hear your comments

Megaphone GraphicQuebec’s INESSS wants to hear your comments on apremilast (Otezla®) and adalimumab (Humira®) 

Do you have psoriatic arthritis or juvenile arthritis or care for someone who does? We need your valuable input.

The National Institute of excellence in health and social services (INESSS) in Quebec is asking health professionals, consumers and patients, and patient groups to submit their comments about apremilast (Otezla®) for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis and adalimumab (Humira®) for the treatment of juvenile arthritis. These medications are being evaluated as part of the 2016 update to the List of Medications.  Continue reading

“It hurts!” cried the little kid with arthritis

Kid on grass crawling with a puzzled lookThe question is, how badly does it hurt?

A recent study conducted to evaluate pain measures developed by the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) under the National Institutes of Health help captured the young patient’s perspective of living with chronic pain. The study addressed the different categories of pain experience and language used by children when they talk about chronic pain. In an interview with the Medical Xpress, researchers identified these as:

  • Pain behaviour – The child initiates he or she becomes irritable or suffers a lack of appetite (or other behaviour) when in pain.
  • Pain interference – The child describes slower movement, such as walking, or lack of energy due to pain interference.
  • Pain quality – The child describes pain as sharp, cutting, dull or achy.

The research study was based on the results of individual and focus group interviews with 32 children and with parents of children with chronic pain, such as those affected by juvenile arthritis, sickle cell anemia, and cerebral palsy. Continue reading

Juvenile arthritis affects the future of the human race

Close up of kids, a boy and girlIn the United States alone, more than 300,000 kids, teens, and young adults live with some form of juvenile arthritis (JA). A recent study conducted by the British Society for Paediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology in the United Kingdom found that the mortality rate is high in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Researchers noted that the death rates are the highest among girls, up to 50 times greater than those from the non-JA population.

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is chronic inflammatory arthritis developing in children under the age of 16 years. Previously called juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), juvenile idiopathic arthritis strikes up to one in 1000 children and is one of the most common chronic diseases among children. Continue reading

Living well with arthritis: Tips from people like you

Bikers beside a river fist pumping in the airThe award-winning chef Seamus Mullen, athlete Aimée Espinoza of San Clemente, California, triathlete Dina Neils and Pain Talks Founder Alan Brewington are all successful people, who just happen to live with arthritis. Remember that you have arthritis, but it doesn’t have you.

In an interview with Everyday Health, Seamus Mullen, author of Hero Food and the chef and owner behind New York City’s Tertulia restaurant, said: “I think the first mistake I made was believing that life as I knew it was over. I really felt as though the rug was pulled from beneath me, and that I would never again be able to do the things I once loved doing.” Mullen was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 2007. He adds, “I really wish that, early on, I’d gotten to know more people who were living and functioning with RA, and that I’d learned more about what I could do as an individual to treat the disease, rather than depending so heavily on the medical community for answers.” Continue reading

CRA Interview Series 2015 – Mr. Tristan Kerr on juvenile arthritis

Canadian Rheumatology Association (CRA) and Allied Health Professions Association (AHPA) Interview Series 2015

Today’s feature interview – Mr. Tristan Kerr – The risk of growth retardation and obesity in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) treated with contemporary treatments: Results from the ReACCh-OUT Cohort

ABN reporters from Canada’s arthritis consumer organizations interviewed leading health professionals and researchers during last month’s CRA and AHPA annual meetings.

Beginning March 9, feature interviews will be posted on the ABN YouTube channel http://bit.ly/ABNYouTube. Please help us raise awareness about the important work going on in Canada by sharing the interviews with your organizational and social networks. Continue reading