All posts related to "juvenile idiopathic arthritis"

Do it for the kids! Juvenile arthritis: Exercise, models of care, and advocacy

Four kids playing at the park

In honour of Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month in Canada, we have compiled a list of interviews from this year’s CRA Annual Scientific Meeting & AHPA Annual Meeting in Ottawa. The interviews below highlight models of care, advocacy, clinical practices, and different therapy options for juvenile arthritis.  Continue reading

MedPage Today names top 2016 advances in rheumatology

A group of people jumping up in the air on a beachMedPage Today interviewed specialists in rheumatology in the United States about the advances in rheumatology in 2016. Below are the five most common advances mentioned.

1. Tocilizumab (Actemra) for the treatment of giant cell arteritis 

Giant cell arteritis affects over 200,000 people in the United States. Research data from an international clinical trial showed that after a year of treatment, 56% of the 250 study participants given tocilizumab weekly plus prednisone were in sustained remission, compared with just 14% of those given placebo alone (P<0.0001).

At the annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), Dr. John H. Stone of Harvard University at Boston noted: “There is something new in giant cell arteritis at last, and the era of unending glucocorticoid treatment with no viable alternative is over.” Continue reading

James Lowe: Winger defying arthritis for Super Rugby

James Lowe is a New Zealand rugby union player and an official ambassador for Arthritis New Zealand. Lowe plays in the wing position for the Markos and Chiefs. In 2014, he played his first Super Rugby and contributed to the Chiefs 18-10 victory over the Crusaders in Christchurch. His aim is to play for the Kiwi World Cup squad in the near future.

Lowe was diagnosed with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, also known as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), at the young age of 14. He takes prescribed medications and a weekly injection to control his arthritis. JIA strikes children under the age of 16 and affects an estimated one in 1000 children.  It is one of the most common chronic diseases among children. To read about the different subtypes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, please click here. Continue reading

JointHealth™ insight – Medications Guide Edition, June 2016

State of Arthritis Medications: Some old, some new, all important

JointHealth Meds Slide for 2016The reliable, quick reference arthritis medications guide you need to assist you and your health care team with your therapy conversations.

The JointHealth™ Medications Guide gives you information on the most commonly prescribed medications for inflammatory types of arthritis and osteoarthritis. Medication information for the following diseases is included in this year’s guide: rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, juvenile arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitis, osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis.

In this JointHealth™ insight, you will also find:

  • An explanation of the naming changes in the different categories of
    arthritis medications
  • Insight into the patient-physician therapy conversation by Cheryl Koehn, Founder and President of Arthritis Consumer Experts
  • Updated disease information for rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, juvenile arthritis, and lupus
  • The latest research on methotrexate and the consumption of alcoholic beverages

 

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and bullying

Girl thinkingJuvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is chronic inflammatory arthritis developing in children under the age of 16 years. The disease strikes up to one in 1000 children and is one of the most common chronic diseases among children.

Autoimmune diseases generally occur when the body’s immune system begins to malfunction and attack healthy tissue in various parts of the body, causing inflammation and damage. In JIA, joints are attacked by inflammation and become stiff, painful, and swollen. Some children with JIA develop inflammation involving their eyes as well; in some severe subtypes of JIA, organs such as the heart or lungs can be involved. Continue reading