All posts related to "knee"

Younger patients getting knees and hips replaced. Is this an additional burden on the healthcare system?

New research shows that patients undergoing total joint replacement are younger now than they were in 2000. According to a review from the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database, the average patient undergoing a total hip replacement (THR) in 2014 was 64.9 years, while the average patient in 2000 was 66.3 years. In parallel, the average patient undergoing a total knee replacement (TKR) was 65.9 in 2014, and 68.0 in 2000.

Dr. Matthew Sloan, lead researcher and orthopaedic resident at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, tells Reuters Health by email: “These differences may not seem like much, but an average decrease of two years in a pool of 1 million people is a significant difference. It’s also a meaningful difference when you take into account the fact that these total joint replacements have a finite lifespan.”

Dr. Sloan further explains: “The technology for total hip and knee replacements continues to improve. However, at some point, the implant wears out. We believe modern implants without any unforeseen complications should last 20 years or more. The problem with an increasingly younger group of patients having these procedures, it becomes more likely that the implant will wear out during their lifetime. When this happens, a second surgery is required to revise the joint replacement. These procedures are not as successful as the initial surgeries, they are bigger operations, they take longer, and now the patient is 20 years older and not as strong as they were when they had the initial procedure.”

Because a second surgery is riskier and prone to complications like early failure or infection, the goal is to wait as long as possible so that a patient will undergo one surgery in their life. Other findings presented at the American Society of Orthopaedic Surgeon’s annual meeting include: Continue reading

Study Review: the power of prehabilitation when undergoing joint replacement

Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA), also known as hip/ knee replacements, are surgical procedures in which parts of the joint are replaced with artificial material to restore function and ultimately reduce pain. As an arthritis patient, if other forms of treatment have not improved the joint’s ability to function or been able to prevent additional damage, your rheumatologist may recommend arthroplasty.

A recent study conducted by a team of Canadian Physiotherapists at The University of Western Ontario has discovered valuable information regarding the impact of prehabilitative care prior to arthroplasty. The team wanted to see if education and exercises for patients before surgery (prehabilitation) impacts pain, function, strength, anxiety and length of hospital stay after surgery (post-operative outcomes).

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Knee pain? Join the SuPRA study and get active!

Knee pain? Join the SuPRA study and get active!

Participate in a new study that will use wearable activity trackers, paired with a new web application, and physical activity counselling to help you get more active!

Picture of runner's leg from knee to feet Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of chronic pain and disability. Physical activity can help to decrease pain and disability in joints affected by OA while benefiting your overall health.

If you are a person living with knee pain or knee OA, and interested in getting more active, we invite YOU to participate in the SuPRA study. Through participating in SuPRA you will learn how to get active with knee OA. You will be asked to attend an education session, use a Fitbit Flex activity tracker with the new web application, and receive counselling from a registered physiotherapist. The total time commitment for the study is 9 months. Enrol now to start in January 2018!

If you are interested, please fill out a 3-minute screening questionnaire.All responses will remain confidential, and you will be contacted by a research staff member within 48 hours to discuss your eligibility further.

Survey Link: http://open.arthritisresearch.ca/survey/index.php?r=survey/index/sid/143586/lang/en.

For more information, contact Halima Elmi, Research Coordinator at 604-207-4053 or 1-844-707-4053, or via email at supra.activity@arthritisresearch.ca.

University of British Columbia Survey: Running and knee osteoarthritis

University of British Columbia Survey: Running and knee osteoarthritis

What do the public and healthcare professionals think about the effects of running on knee joint health?

Male jogger’s leg to represent knee OA survey

This online survey should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

A research group co-led by Drs. Michael Hunt and Jean-Francois Esculier at the University of British Columbia is currently conducting a survey investigating how people perceive the appropriateness of running for maintaining knee joint health. This online survey should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

You may be able to participate if you:

  • Are aged 40 years and older (except for healthcare professionals)
  • Have access to the Internet to complete the survey
  • Speak English or French

Participation is anonymous and no information will identify you. Should you have any questions, feel free to contact Dr. Jean-Francois Esculier at jean-francois.esculier@ubc.ca.

The survey can be found here:
https://survey.ubc.ca/s/running-kneeOA/

What do the public and healthcare professionals think about the effects of running on knee joint health?

Banner title for knee OA and running surveyWhat do the public and healthcare professionals think about the effects of running on knee joint health?

This online survey should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

A research group co-led by Drs. Michael Hunt and Jean-Francois Esculier at the University of British Columbia is currently conducting a survey investigating how people perceive the appropriateness of running for maintaining knee joint health. This online survey should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

You may be able to participate if you:

  • Are aged 40 years and older (except for healthcare professionals)
  • Have access to the Internet to complete the survey
  • Speak English or French

Participation is anonymous and no information will identify you. Should you have any questions, feel free to contact Dr. Jean-Francois Esculier at jean-francois.esculier@ubc.ca.

The survey can be found here:
https://survey.ubc.ca/s/running-kneeOA/

Decreased rate of joint replacement for RA patients on biologics

Knee with osteoarthritis

Image courtesy of yodiyim at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

A study published in the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress last month shows that the incidence of knee and hip replacement declined after the introduction of biologics to national rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment guidelines.

The study looked at 30,868 patients diagnosed with RA at the rheumatology department between 1996 and 2011 and compared them with 301,527 controls from the general population. The baseline total knee replacement (TKR) incidence rate per 1,000 person-years was 5.87 for RA versus 0.42 for the controlled group. Prior to 2002, the incidence of total knee replacement increased among RA patients, but started to decrease after the introduction of bDMARDs and their associated guidelines in 2003. In February of 2007, the rate of TKR changed to 1.8 TKRs/1,000 person. Over the study period, the incidence of total knee replacement and total hip replacement increased among the general population controlled group. In contrast, there was a downward trend among RA patients.

Lene Dreyer, MD, from the Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases in Denmark, is one of the author the study. Dreyer explained: “Our findings show a clear downward trend in these two operations in RA patients in Denmark since the additions of [biologic disease-modifying anti rheumatic drugs] bDMARDs to treatment protocols. Also, the overall pattern of our findings is in line with those recently reported from England and Wales.”

Below is a video examining the quality of rehabilitation care, specifically in hip and knee replacements: Continue reading

What is an ACL injury?

Knee anatomy

Picture from orthoinfo.aaos.org

An ACL injury is the tear or sprain of an anterior cruciate ligament – one of the major ligaments in your knee. The cruciate ligaments are found inside your knee joint and combined, the anterior and the posterior cruciate ligaments control the back and forth motion of your knee. An ACL injury is one of the most common knee injury and often occur in athletes who play physically demanding sports like soccer, football, and basketball.

According to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, injured ligaments are considered “sprains” and are graded on a severity scale, as listed below:

  • Grade 1 Sprains – The ligament is mildly damaged in a Grade 1 Sprain. It has been slightly stretched, but is able to help keep the knee joint stable.
  • Grade 2 Sprains – A Grade 2 Sprain stretches the ligament to the point where it becomes loose. This is often referred to as a partial tear of the ligament.
  • Grade 3 Sprains – This type of sprain is most commonly referred to as a complete tear of the ligament. The ligament has been split into two pieces, and the knee joint is unstable.

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FIFA 11+ : Preventing osteoarthritis by preventing injuries in youth

FIFA 11+ Team

Photo from: http://f-marc.com/11plus/home/

FIFA 11+ : Preventing osteoarthritis by preventing injuries in youth

The FIFA Women’s World Cup™ is here in Canada and causing excitement across the country. Our youth will see the best female soccer players in the world take their places on the field to play the “beautiful” game. Soccer in Canada has one of the largest participation rates in youth. However, there is a downside – injury – especially of the knee and ankle. Knee and ankle injury rate in soccer are significant for both boys and girls, with girls up to 8 times more likely to have an injury. Injuries cause pain and disability and can lead to long-term consequences – osteoarthritis (OA). Sports injuries are one of the leading causes of developing osteoarthritis later in life which results in daily pain and suffering for millions of people across Canada. Many people with OA can remember the injury that started their knee or ankle problems. Continue reading

ROAR 2014: Joint Involvement – Hips-Knees-Hands-Feet

ROAR 2014: Joint Involvement – Hips-Knees-Hands-Feet

ROAR postcardJoin us at an interactive public forum hosted by the Arthritis Patient Advisory Board of the Arthritis Research Centre of Canada.

Patients, researchers and healthcare providers will be discussing the latest research on quality hip and knee replacement rehabilitation, bone changes in early rheumatoid arthritis and more.

What is ROAR?

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Do you have arthritis in your knee?

knee xrayOsteoarthritis is a form of arthritis that can affect any joint, but the hands and weight-bearing joints – including the spine, hips and knees – are most often affected. This type of arthritis is commonly known as wear and tear arthritis, a disease that involves the wear and tear of the natural cushioning lining the joints. A common form of osteoarthritis is knee arthritis. Do you know what the symptoms of knee arthritis are? Below are some warning signs of knee arthritis.

1. Gradual increase in knee pain

Arthritis pain in the knees does not occur overnight, but slowly and gradually. You experience pain in your knees when you climb stairs, stand, kneel, or even sit down. If your knee pain is preventing you from a good night’s sleep, be weary that it could be arthritis.

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