All posts related to "lupus"

Do you have Rheumatoid Arthritis or Lupus? Join the OPAM-IA study and get active!

FitBit Tracker for Active livingParticipate in a new study that will use wearable activity trackers, paired with a new web application, and physical activity counselling to help you get more active!

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are types of inflammatory arthritis that causes inflammation and deformity of the joints, and affects your immune system. Physical activity can help to decrease pain and disability in joints affected by RA and SLE while benefiting your overall health.

If you are a person living with RA or SLE, and are interested in getting more active, we invite YOU to participate in the OPAM-IA study. Through participating in the OPAM-IA study, you will learn how to get active with RA or SLE. You will be asked to attend an education session, use a Fitbit Flex activity tracker with the new web application, and receive counselling from a registered physiotherapist. The total time commitment for the study is 6 months.

If you are interested, please fill out a 2-minute screening questionnaire.All responses will remain confidential, and you will be contacted by a research staff member within 48 hours to discuss your eligibility further.

Survey Link:
http://open.arthritisresearch.ca/survey/index.php?r=survey/index/sid/455398/lang/en

For more information, contact Navi Grewal, study coordinator at 604-207-4053 or 1-844-707-4053 (toll free), or via email at opam.activity@arthritisresearch.ca.

Cold hands are one of several warning signs of Raynaud’s Phenomenon

Close up of girl wearing mittens - way to prevent Raynaud'sRaynaud’s phenomenon is a condition in which there is an exaggerated blood vessel tightening in response to cold or emotional stress, restricting blood flow to certain areas of the body – most often the fingers, but sometimes the toes, ears, or the end of the nose.

The exaggerated vascular response (tightening) in Raynaud’s phenomenon is called vasospasm, which often occur in response to cold or emotional stress. With vasospasm, the fingers turn white and cold then blue with dilated veins followed by relaxation of the vessel and normal blood flow causing a red ‘flushing’

According to a recent article published in The New England Journal of Medicine, Raynaud’s affects approximately 3 to 5 percent of the population – women are more often affected than men. Raynaud’s phenomenon occurs in two forms – primary and secondary. Primary is the most common and has no underlying cause. Secondary is when Raynaud’s phenomenon occurs in combination with another autoimmune disease like scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome or systemic lupus erythematous. The article also states that people who work with certain chemicals, like vinyl chloride, or vibrating tools like a jackhammer are also susceptible to secondary Raynaud’s. Continue reading

MedPage Today names top 2016 advances in rheumatology

A group of people jumping up in the air on a beachMedPage Today interviewed specialists in rheumatology in the United States about the advances in rheumatology in 2016. Below are the five most common advances mentioned.

1. Tocilizumab (Actemra) for the treatment of giant cell arteritis 

Giant cell arteritis affects over 200,000 people in the United States. Research data from an international clinical trial showed that after a year of treatment, 56% of the 250 study participants given tocilizumab weekly plus prednisone were in sustained remission, compared with just 14% of those given placebo alone (P<0.0001).

At the annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), Dr. John H. Stone of Harvard University at Boston noted: “There is something new in giant cell arteritis at last, and the era of unending glucocorticoid treatment with no viable alternative is over.” Continue reading

Team USA’s Shannon Boxx: Life & Soccer with Lupus

Shannon with Lupus banner

Picture credit: Fame! Soccer Girl https://famegirlsworldcupblog.wordpress.com/page/2/

As we celebrate the FIFA Women’s World Cup™, Team Arthritis wants to pay tribute to team USA’s midfielder Shannon Boxx, who, living with lupus, is all too familiar with life with arthritis. This year’s World Cup™ marks Boxx’s fourth Women’s World Cup™.

Fun Fact: Midfielders run a distance of 120-yard across the field to play offense and sprints back to play defense, running about 7 miles in a 90-minute game and engaging in close combat to gain possession of the ball. Continue reading

ACR News – Happiness from the Inside Out: A patient’s perspective

Picture of a butterflyCynthia Coney, MEd, CAPP, was the keynote speaker, and spoke as a patient living with lupus, at ACR’s ARHP Keynote Address: Happiness from the Inside Out. Coney is a nationally recognized speaker, trainer, and author. She holds a Master’s Degree in Educational Leadership and is a Master Trainer for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and The Center for Prevention Workforce Development. Her publications include: Earned Income: A Critical Resource for Sustainable Nonprofit Health Organizations, Intellectual Property for Nonprofit Organizations, and The Wild Woman’s Guide to Living with Chronic Illness.

As a patient who’s been diagnosed with lupus in 1980, she shared her experience as a patient receiving care and support for more than 30 years. She had one advice to offer health professionals, that is: offer empathy, not sympathy.

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The NIH has awarded $6 million to arthritis research

AMP Program Word CloudThe National Institute of Health (NIH) has awarded 11 grants (a total of $6 million) to members of the Accelerating Medicines Partnership in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Lupus (AMP RA/Lupus) Network. The alliance includes various private and public research groups across the United States who are committed to advance research on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and lupus drugs.

AMP RA/Lupus hope to identify and test biologic agents for RA and lupus treatment. Researchers believe that the disease similarities for RA and lupus will allow them to study both diseases at the same time.

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