All posts related to "medication"

JointHealth™ insight – Medications Guide Edition, June 2016

State of Arthritis Medications: Some old, some new, all important

JointHealth Meds Slide for 2016The reliable, quick reference arthritis medications guide you need to assist you and your health care team with your therapy conversations.

The JointHealth™ Medications Guide gives you information on the most commonly prescribed medications for inflammatory types of arthritis and osteoarthritis. Medication information for the following diseases is included in this year’s guide: rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, juvenile arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitis, osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis.

In this JointHealth™ insight, you will also find:

  • An explanation of the naming changes in the different categories of
    arthritis medications
  • Insight into the patient-physician therapy conversation by Cheryl Koehn, Founder and President of Arthritis Consumer Experts
  • Updated disease information for rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, juvenile arthritis, and lupus
  • The latest research on methotrexate and the consumption of alcoholic beverages


Biomarker tests to help detect rheumatoid arthritis

hand holding test vialTreating rheumatoid arthritis (RA) early and aggressively is vitally important and can help to prevent crippling joint damage. Today specialists recommend a treatment plan that includes education, medication-often a combination of several different types of medication will be used in a person’s treatment plan-social support, appropriate amounts of range-of-motion, cardiovascular and muscle strengthening exercises, rest, vitamins and mineral supplements and a well-balanced diet. Biomarker tests may also help to detect RA and prevent further joint damage.

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AS it Goes – Bridging the Patient-Doctor Divide

The doctor is listeningA checkup appointment at my rheumatologist (doctor who specializes in arthritis) always leads to some interesting discussions. Most of the time I try to “research” a topic beforehand, so that I am armed with the latest background information on whatever are my most pressing concerns at the time. When I launch into my questions (I always have a list written out), I have a better-than-even chance of holding a meaningful conversation with my rheumy. In turn, I get more out of the conversation instead of returning home with questions that even Google cannot answer. Understanding what he is really saying provides me with the sense that I am in control of my ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and not the other way around (AS controlling me?) Continue reading

AS it Goes – The Debate over NSAIDs

Pain relief (and NSAIDs)

Photo courtesy of David Castillo Dominici |

The long-term usage of non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) has always concerned me. Through the years I have taken different types of NSAIDs for varying periods. These NSAIDs even included (for a short time) VIOXX, which was pulled off the shelves in 2004 after studies confirmed that it increased the risk of heart attack and stroke. For many years I have taken diclofenac, which now researchers also believe carries a high cardiovascular risk, especially for people with a history of heart disease or other risk factors such as diabetes or high cholesterol. Continue reading

Call for patient organization input

Stickman with megaphone calling for patient organization inputCall for patient organization input on certolizumab pegol (Cimzia®) for psoriatic arthritis

Do you have psoriatic arthritis or care for someone who does? We need your valuable input.

The Common Drug Review (CDR) is currently welcoming patients and their caregivers to provide input to patient organizations on the manufacturer’s submission for certolizumab pegol (Cimzia®) for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Certolizumab pegol is indicated for use in combination with methotrexate for reducing signs and symptoms and inhibiting the progression of structural damage as assessed by X-ray, in adult patients with moderately to severely active psoriatic arthritis who have failed one or more disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Continue reading

One Needle, Only One Time

Injection needle“One needle, only one time.” This statement may seem obvious in the context of any medical practice but as guest author on the Centers for Disease Control blog Dr. John O’Keefe notes in his article, Moving the Needle to Safe Dentistry, that rule, alarmingly, is not always followed.

As a result, the “One & Only Campaign” was created to raise awareness among patients and healthcare providers about safe injection practices. Led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Safe Injection Practices Coalition (SIPC), the campaign aims to eradicate outbreaks resulting from unsafe injection practices.

Dr. O’Keefe is a dentist and board chairman for the Organization for Safety, Asepsis and Prevention (OSAP), which is the dental sector’s premier organization dedicated to infection prevention and control. OSAP, disappointed when it discovered that unsafe practices in a U.S. dental setting led to the first documented patient-to-patient case of hepatitis C last year, has joined forces with the CDC and SIPC. Click here to read the full article.