All posts related to "osteoarthritis"

Say goodbye to your high heels…

Woman feet with heelsOr maybe tuck them away in your closet once in a while. Last year, at Arthritis Research Canada’s Reaching Out with Arthritis Research (ROAR) event, there was a section commenting on “changing shoes”, arthritis and self-identity. One lady in that research said:

“I started wearing flat shoes. So flat shoes meant pants and never wearing dresses and I was dressing differently and my life became different and after a couple of years, it just, you know, it [RA] wasn’t getting any better…I came to realization that this was it, I was giving up skiing, tennis, that part of my life’s gone.”

This is a demonstration of a causal relationship between arthritis and wearing high heels – I have arthritis; therefore, I am unable to wear high heels when my joints are inflamed or in pain. For those with a wandering mind, you may ask yourself: Can I get arthritis from wearing high heels? If yes, what can I do to add glamour to an outfit and boost my confidence without wearing high heels? 

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ACR News – New frontiers in osteoarthritis treatment

What to doA clinical symposium yesterday at the ACR called New Frontiers in Osteoarthritis Treatment: The Role of Weight Loss, Surgery and Current Treatment Guidelines looked at the management of osteoarthritis (OA) patients through weight loss and exercise, surgery, and medications. The session also looked at the differences in treatment recommendations for OA.

Osteoarthritis and weight loss and exercise

In an interview with ACR Daily News, Stephen P. Messier, PhD, Professor of Health and Exercise Science at Wake Forest University, said: “When combined with exercise, weight loss is a level 1 method of treatment for knee osteoarthritis, and there’s strong support for both weight loss and exercise as the first-line treatment for knee osteoarthritis. I think the problem is that patients don’t know how to do it.”

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What is the Qualman-Davies Leadership Award?

The Qualman-Davies Arthritis Consumer Community Leadership Award was created in 2014 to recognize one person’s contributions to helping all Canadians living with the disease to be heard in decision-making processes that affect millions. That’s what Ann Qualman and Jim Davies did as early pioneers in arthritis advocacy in Canada. Their tireless and selfless efforts helped millions of Canadians.

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Do you have arthritis in your knee?

knee xrayOsteoarthritis is a form of arthritis that can affect any joint, but the hands and weight-bearing joints – including the spine, hips and knees – are most often affected. This type of arthritis is commonly known as wear and tear arthritis, a disease that involves the wear and tear of the natural cushioning lining the joints. A common form of osteoarthritis is knee arthritis. Do you know what the symptoms of knee arthritis are? Below are some warning signs of knee arthritis.

1. Gradual increase in knee pain

Arthritis pain in the knees does not occur overnight, but slowly and gradually. You experience pain in your knees when you climb stairs, stand, kneel, or even sit down. If your knee pain is preventing you from a good night’s sleep, be weary that it could be arthritis.

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Attention: Are you a person living with osteoarthritis (OA)?

Attention: Are you a person living with osteoarthritis (OA)?

Here’s an opportunity to attend a free workshop on models of care for OA.

Workshop BannerThe Arthritis Alliance of Canada (AAC) is offering you an opportunity to participate in its upcoming Osteoarthritis Models of Care (OA MOC) workshop, as part of the AACs 2nd Annual Conference and Research Symposium. The two-hour, OA MOC workshop will take place in Toronto at the Toronto Marriott Downtown Eaton Centre Hotel, Saturday, November 1st, 10:30-am-12:30 pm. Space is limited and registrations will be taken on a “first come, first serve” basis.
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Online survey: Share your opinions on JOINT health!

joint health; knee pain

Joint health has a significant impact on quality of life. There are many exercise programs out there to help people manage chronic joint diseases, but what is the best way for YOU to improve your joint health?

A team of researchers across Canada need your input about the best way to prevent and treat osteoarthritis.

If you are willing to help, please take 5 minutes to fill out this survey. All responses will remain anonymous and confidential and there will be no information collected that will identify you.

Click here to take the survey.

For more information, please contact Joanna Ye, Research Assistant by phone at 604-207-4032, toll free 1-877-871-4575, or email jye@arthritisresearch.ca.