All posts related to "osteoarthritis"

Arthritis Alliance of Canada’s AGM & Research Symposium

AAC Symposium PosterThe Arthritis Alliance of Canada’s (AAC) Annual General meeting and Research Symposium will be held this Thursday and Friday, October 22 and 23 at the Delta Lodge Hotel at Kananaskis, Alberta. The Symposium, entitled “New Directions in Osteoarthritis Research”, will look ahead at promising approaches for future studies, and identify knowledge gaps and research opportunities.

The AAC workshops will focus on building capacity in research and healthcare sustainability. The programme will bring together scientists, engineers, healthcare providers, trainees, specialists, key stakeholders and most importantly, people living with arthritis.

On Thursday evening, guests will attend “Dr. Cy Frank and The Rocky Mountain Pioneers”, a special gala tribute dinner to honour the accomplishments and legacy of Dr. Cy Frank, who was a talented orthopaedic surgeon, skilled researcher, policy maker, and champion for patient. The winner for the Qualman-Davies Arthritis Consumer Community Leadership Award will also be announced. This prestigious award is given to a person with arthritis who has, or is, providing leadership in the community and deserves recognition for their valuable volunteer work.

ROAR 2015: Osteoarthritis and You – What you can do NOW!

ROAR 2015 BannerROAR 2015: Osteoarthritis and You – What you can do NOW!

Join us at an interactive public forum hosted by the Arthritis Patient Advisory Board of Arthritis Research Canada.

What do a rheumatologist, an orthopaedic surgeon, a clinical bio- mechanist, a clinical health researcher and an arthritis patient/consumer advocate have in common? They are all osteoarthritis (OA) experts, who will speak at ROAR 2015.

What do people with OA want to know? We are honoured to have six speakers share their research with us, guided by topics that represent the patient voice.

What is ROAR?
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Managing your osteoarthritis and inflammatory arthritis is a full-time job

Work stationYou may think that working a 9-to-5 desk job is tough. Think about doing that while managing your osteoarthritis and/or inflammatory arthritis, which itself is a full-time job on its own. For people living with these diseases, working in an office environment – and sitting for a prolonged period – can create joint stiffness in the spine, hips or knees. Improper posture and technique when using a computer or writing may aggravate pain for people with the disease in their hands. It can also place additional stress on affected joints. Experts suggest we maintain regular movement throughout the workday as sitting too much can weaken the muscles surrounding your joints.

In an interview with the Globe and Mail, Dr. Aileen Davis, a professor in the departments of physical therapy and surgery at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Medicine, said: “For people who are spending long days sitting at work, we would recommend that they periodically do some stretches and also that they get up from their desk and move around every hour, hour and a half. I’m not saying that you’ve got to walk a long, long way, but just even the fact that you’re getting up and moving around your office is helpful.” Continue reading

Runners, on your mark…get set…go!

Woman jogging on trailRunning is a popular form of exercise in Canada – be it along the sea wall, in the park, or at the gym. Today the research suggests that aerobic activity is great for becoming and maintaining fitness and health. Many people believe that running can worsen or be one of the underlying causes of osteoarthritis. A new study puts this fear at ease.

According to an article on Arthritis Digest, “A recent research presented at the Osteoarthritis Research Society International World Congress showed that people aged over 50 years old with osteoarthritis who ran on a regular basis did not have any increase in pain, or radiographic structural progression, over the four-year study.” Continue reading

Osteoarthritis and the glory of professional football

Professional football players, like the women playing in the FIFA Women World Cup™ this year, show displays of skill and agility on the field; playing a sport they are passionate about. Like many others, their success builds on wins and losses, both on and off the field, and sometimes, the players pay the ultimate price – developing painful hips and knees during or after their football career. Players who have had a knee or hip replacement include Sir Trevor Brooking, former member of club West Ham United and current director of football development in England, and Bob Wilson.

FIFA Soccer GameAccording to Arthritis Research UK, after aging and obesity, injury to a joint is the third major risk factor for developing osteoarthritis (OA). Because players undergo intense physical training and their knees are subjected to constant strain, they are more prone to injury. Continue reading

FIFA 11+ : Preventing osteoarthritis by preventing injuries in youth

FIFA 11+ Team

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FIFA 11+ : Preventing osteoarthritis by preventing injuries in youth

The FIFA Women’s World Cup™ is here in Canada and causing excitement across the country. Our youth will see the best female soccer players in the world take their places on the field to play the “beautiful” game. Soccer in Canada has one of the largest participation rates in youth. However, there is a downside – injury – especially of the knee and ankle. Knee and ankle injury rate in soccer are significant for both boys and girls, with girls up to 8 times more likely to have an injury. Injuries cause pain and disability and can lead to long-term consequences – osteoarthritis (OA). Sports injuries are one of the leading causes of developing osteoarthritis later in life which results in daily pain and suffering for millions of people across Canada. Many people with OA can remember the injury that started their knee or ankle problems. Continue reading