All posts related to "osteoarthritis"

Runners, on your mark…get set…go!

Woman jogging on trailRunning is a popular form of exercise in Canada – be it along the sea wall, in the park, or at the gym. Today the research suggests that aerobic activity is great for becoming and maintaining fitness and health. Many people believe that running can worsen or be one of the underlying causes of osteoarthritis. A new study puts this fear at ease.

According to an article on Arthritis Digest, “A recent research presented at the Osteoarthritis Research Society International World Congress showed that people aged over 50 years old with osteoarthritis who ran on a regular basis did not have any increase in pain, or radiographic structural progression, over the four-year study.” Continue reading

Osteoarthritis and the glory of professional football

Professional football players, like the women playing in the FIFA Women World Cup™ this year, show displays of skill and agility on the field; playing a sport they are passionate about. Like many others, their success builds on wins and losses, both on and off the field, and sometimes, the players pay the ultimate price – developing painful hips and knees during or after their football career. Players who have had a knee or hip replacement include Sir Trevor Brooking, former member of club West Ham United and current director of football development in England, and Bob Wilson.

FIFA Soccer GameAccording to Arthritis Research UK, after aging and obesity, injury to a joint is the third major risk factor for developing osteoarthritis (OA). Because players undergo intense physical training and their knees are subjected to constant strain, they are more prone to injury. Continue reading

FIFA 11+ : Preventing osteoarthritis by preventing injuries in youth

FIFA 11+ Team

Photo from: http://f-marc.com/11plus/home/

FIFA 11+ : Preventing osteoarthritis by preventing injuries in youth

The FIFA Women’s World Cup™ is here in Canada and causing excitement across the country. Our youth will see the best female soccer players in the world take their places on the field to play the “beautiful” game. Soccer in Canada has one of the largest participation rates in youth. However, there is a downside – injury – especially of the knee and ankle. Knee and ankle injury rate in soccer are significant for both boys and girls, with girls up to 8 times more likely to have an injury. Injuries cause pain and disability and can lead to long-term consequences – osteoarthritis (OA). Sports injuries are one of the leading causes of developing osteoarthritis later in life which results in daily pain and suffering for millions of people across Canada. Many people with OA can remember the injury that started their knee or ankle problems. Continue reading

AS it Goes – Light-hearted poetry helps to cope

“Spring has sprung

The grass is riz

I wonder where the birdie is?

The little bird is on the wing,

But thats absurd!

Because the wing is on the bird!

 

Stuart Miles_FDP.net

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

This little ditty, which many of us learned as children, should be changed for all chronic pain sufferers: substitute “pain” for “bird”! (The verse is equally nonsensical if you read bird or pain, with apologies to author Ogden Nash, an American poet best known for writing pithy and funny light verse). Continue reading

AS it Goes – Bridging the Patient-Doctor Divide

The doctor is listeningA checkup appointment at my rheumatologist (doctor who specializes in arthritis) always leads to some interesting discussions. Most of the time I try to “research” a topic beforehand, so that I am armed with the latest background information on whatever are my most pressing concerns at the time. When I launch into my questions (I always have a list written out), I have a better-than-even chance of holding a meaningful conversation with my rheumy. In turn, I get more out of the conversation instead of returning home with questions that even Google cannot answer. Understanding what he is really saying provides me with the sense that I am in control of my ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and not the other way around (AS controlling me?) Continue reading

Hat’s off to surgeon and innovator Cy Frank

The recent passing of surgeon and innovator Cy Frank cast a grey shadow over Canada’s health care community. Dr. Frank was the President and CEO of Alberta Innovates Health Solutions (AIHS), which funds research and promotes innovation in the health system. On March 5, he died in his sleep of a heart attack, at the age of 65.

In an interview with the Globe and Mail, Tom Noseworthy, associate chief medical officer for clinical networks and clinical care pathways at Alberta Health Services, said: “Cy was a visionary leader with a constant, unrelenting commitment to the greater good. It was his preoccupation – obsession even – to make the health system better, and he did.”

Dr. Cyril Frank

Picture from the University of Calgary

Continue reading