All posts related to "osteoarthritis"

An important arthritis read before you vote

The BC provincial election is on May 9, 2017 – Vote for arthritis!

BC Election - Vote forArthritis Consumer Experts (ACE) asked British Columbia’s political parties, leaders and candidates to share their views on how to improve arthritis prevention, treatment and care.

Arthritis affects 1 in 5 British Columbia residents and is the leading cause of disability in the province. The economic burden of arthritis is expected to double within a generation and strain the BC health system’s ability to provide quality care to BC patients with arthritis.

ACE sent an open letter and survey to all candidates and political parties running in the upcoming May 9th British Columbia provincial election. ACE has received party responses from the BC Liberal Party, BC NDP, BC Green Party, BC Citizens First Party and the BC New Republican Party to questions regarding models of care, osteoarthritis education, aboriginal arthritis care, reimbursement for inflammatory arthritis medications and flexible work arrangements. To view a political party’s response, click on the links below.

To view all candidate and party responses, please visit ACE’s BC Election 2017 page and please vote on May 9th. We encourage you to:

  • Circulate this survey and candidate responses to friends, family, healthcare professionals, and your local media.
  • Reach out to your candidates; here are tips on how to communicate with your electoral candidates, please visit our “Taking Action” page and click on “What You Can Do“.

Canadian Obesity Network publishes first-ever Report Card On Access to Obesity Treatment

Canadian Obesity Network publishes first-ever Report Card On Access to Obesity Treatment For Adults in Canada 2017

A paradigm shift in the prevention and treatment of obesity.

Report Card on Obesity Treatment Cover PhotoThe report is a shift away from considering obesity to be merely the result of poor lifestyle choices toward a socio-ecological model of health that carries with it an obligation to our health systems and society to prevent and treat it as we do other chronic diseases.

Understanding your Body Mass Index (BMI)
Health Canada’s Canadian Guidelines for Body Weight Classification in Adults uses the Body Mass Index (BMI) to determine if someone is overweight. You can calculate your BMI using the formula below or online here:

BMI = weight (kg)/height (m)2

Health Canada’s Health Risk Classification According to Body Mass Index (BMI) table shows the correlation between your BMI score and your risk of developing health problems, such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, arthritis and cancer. Please note other factors may influence your BMI. You should consult your family physician if you are concerned about being overweight.
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Call for participants – Making it work: Employment & Arthritis

Drawing of a desktop work spaceMaking it work: Employment & Arthritis 

Arthritis Research Canada is looking for participants to join a study on preventing work loss for people with osteoarthritis. 

Purpose of this study: The aim of this study is to develop an on-line eLearning self-management program to help people with osteoarthritis deal with employment issues and stay employed.

Who can participate?
Anyone from the province of British Columbia and Alberta.

To be eligible to participate in this study, you must:

  1. Be between the ages of 18 and 70 years;
  2. Have been told by a physician that you have osteoarthritis in either the hip, the knee, or your hands;
  3. Be currently employed OR having stopped working in the past 5 years;

What is involved? Continue reading

Osteoarthritis will cost the Canadian economy $17.5 billion per year

Knee with osteoarthritis

Image courtesy of yodiyim at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

According to a study published in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, the rate of osteoarthritis (OA) is increasing and Canada’s aging population and rising rate of obesity is to blame. Osteoarthritis is a leading cause of chronic pain and loss of mobility in Canada and is associated with reduced productivity and increased burden on the health care system.

Statistics Canada reports that almost two-thirds of Canadian adults and 23% of children are overweight or obese. “These compelling demographic trends will increase the burden of OA and the associated disability among the working age population will become substantial in the coming years,” Behram Sharif, research team lead and an Alberta Bone and Joint Health Institute post-doctoral fellow based at the University of Calgary, said. Continue reading

New blood test could provide early diagnosis of osteoarthritis

Picture of Dr. Naila Rabbani

Source: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/newsandevents/pressreleases/blood_test_for/

Researchers at the University of Warwick have developed a new blood test to diagnosis early-stage arthritis years before the onset of physical and irreversible symptoms. The study, published in the journal Arthritis Research and Therapy, states that the test provides early diagnosis of osteoarthritis (OA). The test can distinguish between early OA and early-stage rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other self-resolving inflammatory joint diseases.

The test identifies the chemical signatures found in the plasma of blood joint proteins damaged by oxidation, nitration and glycation (the modification of proteins with oxygen, nitrogen and sugar molecules). Continue reading

Cycling: A low-impact exercise for people with arthritis

Picture of a bike for cyclingWhen American Olympic gold medal cyclist Kristin Armstrong was diagnosed with osteoarthritis in her hips in 2001, she decided to focus on cycling. She is the second American woman to win a gold medal in cycling. Besides cycling, Armstrong does an exercise routine that involves stretching and yoga to keep her arthritis pain at bay.

Low-impact exercises are the best types of exercise for people living with arthritis. Examples of low-impact exercises include swimming, walking, and cycling. These sports are less stressful to weight-bearing joints, especially the spine, hips, feet, knees and ankles.

If you are inspired by the Cycling Road event happening today at the Rio 2016 Olympics and would like to try cycling for yourself, here are some tips to optimize your cycling experience: Continue reading

JointHealth™ insight – Medications Guide Edition, June 2016

State of Arthritis Medications: Some old, some new, all important

JointHealth Meds Slide for 2016The reliable, quick reference arthritis medications guide you need to assist you and your health care team with your therapy conversations.

The JointHealth™ Medications Guide gives you information on the most commonly prescribed medications for inflammatory types of arthritis and osteoarthritis. Medication information for the following diseases is included in this year’s guide: rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, juvenile arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitis, osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis.

In this JointHealth™ insight, you will also find:

  • An explanation of the naming changes in the different categories of
    arthritis medications
  • Insight into the patient-physician therapy conversation by Cheryl Koehn, Founder and President of Arthritis Consumer Experts
  • Updated disease information for rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, juvenile arthritis, and lupus
  • The latest research on methotrexate and the consumption of alcoholic beverages

 

Osteoarthritis patients at risk of unemployment

Business MeetingA research team from the University of Calgary and Statistics Canada found that people living with osteoarthritis (OA) have almost twice the risk of losing work time due to illness or disability as those without OA. Furthermore, the researchers found that people with OA are three times as likely to become unemployed.

Combining the National Population Health Survey, the researchers selected 659 people with OA, matched them with 2,144 non-OA individuals on the basis of age and sex, and compared their reported work time loss from 2000 to 2010. Work time loss was 90% higher and unemployment tripled due to illness or disability among the OA patients after adjusting for sociodemographic, health and work-related status.

Osteoarthritis is by far the most common type of arthritis. It is estimated to affect more than 3,200,000 Canadians-about 1 in 10. The disease is the leading cause of chronic pain and loss of mobility in Canada and is associated strongly with diminished productivity and increased utilization of healthcare resources. Disease onset usually occurs during the working years. Continue reading

Arthritis Alliance of Canada’s AGM & Research Symposium

AAC Symposium PosterThe Arthritis Alliance of Canada’s (AAC) Annual General meeting and Research Symposium will be held this Thursday and Friday, October 22 and 23 at the Delta Lodge Hotel at Kananaskis, Alberta. The Symposium, entitled “New Directions in Osteoarthritis Research”, will look ahead at promising approaches for future studies, and identify knowledge gaps and research opportunities.

The AAC workshops will focus on building capacity in research and healthcare sustainability. The programme will bring together scientists, engineers, healthcare providers, trainees, specialists, key stakeholders and most importantly, people living with arthritis.

On Thursday evening, guests will attend “Dr. Cy Frank and The Rocky Mountain Pioneers”, a special gala tribute dinner to honour the accomplishments and legacy of Dr. Cy Frank, who was a talented orthopaedic surgeon, skilled researcher, policy maker, and champion for patient. The winner for the Qualman-Davies Arthritis Consumer Community Leadership Award will also be announced. This prestigious award is given to a person with arthritis who has, or is, providing leadership in the community and deserves recognition for their valuable volunteer work.

ROAR 2015: Osteoarthritis and You – What you can do NOW!

ROAR 2015 BannerROAR 2015: Osteoarthritis and You – What you can do NOW!

Join us at an interactive public forum hosted by the Arthritis Patient Advisory Board of Arthritis Research Canada.

What do a rheumatologist, an orthopaedic surgeon, a clinical bio- mechanist, a clinical health researcher and an arthritis patient/consumer advocate have in common? They are all osteoarthritis (OA) experts, who will speak at ROAR 2015.

What do people with OA want to know? We are honoured to have six speakers share their research with us, guided by topics that represent the patient voice.

What is ROAR?
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