All posts related to "osteoarthritis"

Survey: Help inform the FLARE-OA international project team

University of Lorraine logoThe aim of this survey is to create a tool for the detection of a flare in osteoarthritis of lower limbs that occurred in the past 4 weeks. 

Dear Sir/Madame,

The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) are inviting you to participate in a Delphi survey of the “FLARE-OA” research project entitled “Development and validation of a tool for the detection of flare in osteoarthritis of the lower limbs”.

The “FLARE-OA” project is led by researchers at the University of Lorraine in France and aims to define flare in osteoarthritis (OA). The research team needs to know what patients think is important to consider to define OA flare. The aim of this survey is to create a tool for the detection of a flare in osteoarthritis of lower limbs that occurred on the past 4 weeks.

There is no right or wrong answer in this Delphi survey. Your responses should be based on your own experience and knowledge on the subject.

If you wish to participate in this survey, please:

  1. Register through a unique link, providing your first and last name, and email address: http://enquetes.univ-lorraine.fr/index.php/13432?newtest=Y
  2. Once you register, a link to the questionnaire/survey will be sent to your email account asking you to complete the FLARE-OA FIRST ROUND survey

The survey will take approximately 10 minutes to complete and should not exceed 15 minutes when connected to our site. You have the possibility to answer the survey sequentially (save and reload your ongoing answer). Please provide a response within 3 weeks.

Your participation is very important to the international research team! We thank you in advance for your kind cooperation.

Sincerely,

The FLARE-OA international project team

Francis Guillemin (co-PI), David Hunter (co-PI), Gillian Hawker, Lyn March, Bruno Fautrel, Claudia Rutherford, Elisabeth Spitz, Camille Ricatte, Amandine Schoumacker, Laetitia Ricci-Boyer, Marita Cross, Annica Barcenilla-Wong, Joanna Makovey, Hema Umapathy, Hakima Manseur

Youth Sport Injury and Osteoarthritis

With summer upon us, millions of Canadian youth are participating in sport activities every day. Sport and recreation is a great way for youth to get exercise, socialize, develop teamwork skills and improve mental and physical health. Unfortunately, the benefits of sport also come with the risk of injury. In fact, one in three youth aged 11-18 years will sustain a sport-related injury that requires medical attention each year, with knee and ankle injuries being the most common. Research has shown that these youth sport injuries, if not treated properly, can lead to osteoarthritis (OA) within 15 years, specifically a form known as post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Youth sport injury can also lead to obesity later in life, which happens to be another major risk factor for OA. This means that youth with 1 major risk factor for OA (joint injury) are in danger of acquiring a second risk factor for the disease (obesity).

Osteoarthritis is caused by the breakdown of cartilage in the joints and affects more than 5 million Canadians nation-wide; the disease can cause moderate to severe pain, disability and even require surgery. Osteoarthritis symptoms generally appear 10-15 years after a joint injury, and by this time the disease is very difficult to treat. Unlike inflammatory arthritis, there are no medications to slow the disease process of osteoarthritis, so preventative measures are of even greater importance. The upside? We can ensure our youth take proper precautions to avoid injury and hugely minimize their risk of developing OA.

What can a coach or parent do to help?

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Please take the development survey for an “Osteoarthritis (OA) Information Tool for Patients”

The Osteoarthritis (OA) Information Tool for Patients will be a valuable information and education resource for people experiencing early or established hand, knee and/or hip OA.

The Arthritis Alliance of Canada, The College of Family Physicians of Canada and the Centre for Effective Practice need your help to inform the development of a new and valuable information and education resource for people experiencing early or established hand, knee and/or hip osteoarthritis. The Osteoarthritis (OA) Information Tool for Patients will assist patients in having better conversations with their doctor or other health care professional(s) by informing them about the care they can expect to receive.

The survey will take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Your participation will be anonymous. The deadline to complete the survey is Wednesday, July 25, 2018 at 5pm Pacific Standard Time.

Thank you for your time and help!

Sincerely,

Arthritis Consumer Experts

EULAR News – June 16, 2018

newspaper in mail slot

The benefits of exercise in inflammatory arthritis and osteoarthritis

ACE has frequently written about the benefits of exercise in inflammatory arthritis (IA) and osteoarthritis (OA). During a series of EULAR presentations, speakers provided evidence for regular physical activity for IA and OA patients.

Anne- Kathryn Rausch, an academic from Zurich University, spoke about how general recommendations for physical activity are effective, safe and feasible for patients with ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis.
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Ontario Election 2018: On election day, make your voice count.

On election day, make your voice count.

The general election in Ontario is scheduled for June 7, 2018. What change would you like to see in models of arthritis care? 

Ontario Election BannerArthritis is a chronic disease that has a devastating and debilitating effect on the lives of more than 6 million Canadians. In Ontario, 40% of people with arthritis require help with daily activities, compared to 13% of people with other chronic conditions.

More than 1.7 million people – or 1 in 8 Ontarians – are living with osteoarthritis (OA). Within a generation (30 years), it is anticipated that 1 in 4 or 4.28 million Ontarians will be living with OA and one person in Ontario will be diagnosed every 3 minutes.

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can occur at any age. More than 105,000 people in Ontario were living with RA. The prevalence of RA is expected to rise by 82% by 2030. In 2040, 225,000 – or 1 in 77 people in Ontario – will be living with RA; one person in Ontario will be diagnosed with RA every 53 minutes.

Ontario’s next government needs to listen and consider the needs of these constituents. Arthritis Consumer Experts (ACE) sent a questionnaire to the party leaders and candidates of the 2018 Ontario Provincial Election.

The questionnaire asked the following questions: Continue reading

ACR News: Mobility Matters – Functional measures and arthritis patients

picture for functional measure at ACR

Image courtesy of Ambro at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Stephanie Studenski, MD, MPH, Chief of the Longitudinal Studies Section at the NIH National Institute on Aging, spoke about the importance of functional measurement in patients with reduced performance due to arthritis problems

As part of ACE’s leadership, along with the Canadian Association for Retired Persons (CARP) and Alzheimer’s Society of BC, in the development and launch of the Walk10Blocks app, we learned walking is good for your health. Research shows that even walking 10 city blocks a day, equivalent to about 2,000 – 3,000 steps or 1 km, can help delay dementia and may help improve cardiovascular and joint health over time.

Today at the ACR/ARHP annual meeting, Stephanie Studenski, MD, MPH, Chief of the Longitudinal Studies Section at the NIH National Institute on Aging, spoke about the importance of functional measurement in patients with reduced performance due to arthritis problems:
“Rheumatology was among the first disciplines to develop functional measures such as the 50-foot walk and grip strength, and in my original training as a rheumatologist, I was struck by how potentially powerful and meaningful these functional measurements are.” She added: “We’ve found that these measures are powerful predictors of overall effect in adults, including risk of hospitalization, length of stay, hospital-related complications, surgery related complications and overall survival.”

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Knee pain? Join the SuPRA study and get active!

Knee pain? Join the SuPRA study and get active!

Participate in a new study that will use wearable activity trackers, paired with a new web application, and physical activity counselling to help you get more active!

Picture of runner's leg from knee to feet Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of chronic pain and disability. Physical activity can help to decrease pain and disability in joints affected by OA while benefiting your overall health.

If you are a person living with knee pain or knee OA, and interested in getting more active, we invite YOU to participate in the SuPRA study. Through participating in SuPRA you will learn how to get active with knee OA. You will be asked to attend an education session, use a Fitbit Flex activity tracker with the new web application, and receive counselling from a registered physiotherapist. The total time commitment for the study is 9 months. Enrol now to start in January 2018!

If you are interested, please fill out a 3-minute screening questionnaire.All responses will remain confidential, and you will be contacted by a research staff member within 48 hours to discuss your eligibility further.

Survey Link: http://open.arthritisresearch.ca/survey/index.php?r=survey/index/sid/143586/lang/en.

For more information, contact Halima Elmi, Research Coordinator at 604-207-4053 or 1-844-707-4053, or via email at supra.activity@arthritisresearch.ca.

University of British Columbia Survey: Running and knee osteoarthritis

University of British Columbia Survey: Running and knee osteoarthritis

What do the public and healthcare professionals think about the effects of running on knee joint health?

Male jogger’s leg to represent knee OA survey

This online survey should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

A research group co-led by Drs. Michael Hunt and Jean-Francois Esculier at the University of British Columbia is currently conducting a survey investigating how people perceive the appropriateness of running for maintaining knee joint health. This online survey should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

You may be able to participate if you:

  • Are aged 40 years and older (except for healthcare professionals)
  • Have access to the Internet to complete the survey
  • Speak English or French

Participation is anonymous and no information will identify you. Should you have any questions, feel free to contact Dr. Jean-Francois Esculier at jean-francois.esculier@ubc.ca.

The survey can be found here:
https://survey.ubc.ca/s/running-kneeOA/

Do you know if you have osteoporosis or osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis and osteoporosis are different diseases but often there is confusion between these two diseases. This is especially true among older adults. Research by Burgener et al. suggests that although many older adults have heard of osteoporosis, many know very little about it. This is important as having a good understanding of osteoporosis helps to prevent and treat the disease. Below is a chart highlighting the differences between osteoporosis and osteoarthritis.

Question Osteoporosis
(bone+thin=thin bones)
Osteoarthritis
(bone+joint pain=joint damage)
What is it?
  • thin fragile bones that can break easily
  • bone mass loss can occur without any symptoms
  • often a fracture is the first symptom OP is present. Typical fracture locations are the wrist, spine and the hip
  • a frequent cause of height loss and acquired spine curve ‘dowager’s lump’
  • early detection is important to prevent OP
  • a loss of cartilage in the joint, extra bone formation and reduced joint movement
  • most common form of arthritis
  • typical symptoms are pain, loss of movement, and stiffness
  • common joints affected: hands, base of thumbs, tips and middle joints of the fingers, neck, back hips, knees, feet, first toes (bunion) or spine
  • does not affect other organs
Who gets it?
  • 1.4 million Canadians have OP
  • 1 in 4 women over the age of 50
  • 1 in 8 men over the age of 50
  • however, the disease can strike at any age
  • 2.9 million Canadians have OA
  • women more than men (2 out of 3 women)
  • hip and knee OA usually occurs after age 50
  • affects 30% of people over age 75 but is not simply apart of getting old
  • genetic factors and obesity
Who is at risk?
  • being female
  • fracture with minimal trauma after the age of 40
  • small and thin body frames
  • anyone with rheumatoid arthritis speeds up the rate of OP
  • family history of OP
  • some medications including heparin (blood thinner), anti-seizure drugs and long term use of corticosteroids (such as Prednisone)
  • links to persons with obesity, diabetes and cartilage disorders
  • occupational trauma over time
  • sports injuries
Things that increase your risk.
  • loss of menstrual cycle in young women
  • lack of vitamin D and calcium
  • chronic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and Hepatitis C
  • excessive intake of alcohol and caffeine
  • poor nutrition
  • lack of exercise
  • being Caucasian or Asian
  • obesity increases risk of OA of the hand 3 times
  • a weight gain of 10kg (22 lb) almost doubles one’s risk of OA of the knee

 

 

 

Below is a infographic on the Global Impact of Osteoporosis from Cigna.

osteoporosis infographic

Living well with osteoporosis in Canada

It is normal to feel anxious when first diagnosed with osteoporosis. Some patients are concerned they may break their bones again (or fracture a second time if a broken bone was part of the initial diagnosis). As a result, some may stop participating in social and physical activities. This can lead to feelings of loneliness, depression and helplessness. It is important to know that you are not alone. With the help of medications, your health care team, and lifestyle changes, and others living with osteoporosis, you can reduce your risk of fracture and, in some cases, improve bone mass.

Osteoporosis Canada provides helpful resources on how to manage osteoporosis. They also operate a toll-free information line (English: 1-800-463-6842/French: 1-800-977-1778). Information counsellors discuss your concerns, send appropriate information and, if there is one, refer you to a Chapter or support group near you. To learn more about living well with osteoporosis, please click here. To learn more about osteoarthritis, please click here.

What do the public and healthcare professionals think about the effects of running on knee joint health?

Banner title for knee OA and running surveyWhat do the public and healthcare professionals think about the effects of running on knee joint health?

This online survey should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

A research group co-led by Drs. Michael Hunt and Jean-Francois Esculier at the University of British Columbia is currently conducting a survey investigating how people perceive the appropriateness of running for maintaining knee joint health. This online survey should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

You may be able to participate if you:

  • Are aged 40 years and older (except for healthcare professionals)
  • Have access to the Internet to complete the survey
  • Speak English or French

Participation is anonymous and no information will identify you. Should you have any questions, feel free to contact Dr. Jean-Francois Esculier at jean-francois.esculier@ubc.ca.

The survey can be found here:
https://survey.ubc.ca/s/running-kneeOA/