All posts related to "osteoporosis"

Denosumab maintains bone quality in rheumatoid arthritis

Japanese LanternsA recent study from Keio University School of Medicine in Tokyo showed that denosumab inhibited the progression of bone erosion and increased bone mineral density (BMD) in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who were on methotrexate. This study confirmed the findings of an earlier study conducted in the U.S. and Canada.

The study followed 350 patients who have lived with RA for 6 months to less than 5 years’ duration. They were randomized to receive placebo or denosumab in doses of 60 mg every 6 months, every 3 months, or every 2 months. Participants were grouped together according to their glucocorticoid use and rheumatoid factor (RF) status at baseline. Throughout the study, they continued taking methotrexate at 6 to 16 mg/week and were treated with supplemental vitamin D and calcium. Researchers found that the changes from baseline in modified Sharp erosion score at 12 months were lower in the denosumab groups than in the placebo group. Continue reading

CADTH’s Request for Advice on the CDEC’s recommendations for denosumab

Stickman with megaphone calling for patient inputWould you like to provide input to inform CADTH’s report and CDEC’s advice? 

The Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) has received a request for advice for denosumab (Prolia®). The request for advice comes from their participating drug plans, and can result in a revised Canadian Drug Expert Committee (CDEC) recommendation or a CDEC Record of Advice.

CADTH is interested in learning:

  1. How should fracture risk be best described?
  2. Is there a place for age (>75 years) or bone density scores, or are these adequately captured within fracture risk?
  3. How should bisphosphonate failure be best described?
  4. How should bisphosphonate intolerance be best described?

Advice is sought regarding the alignment of the CDEC recommendations for women (2011) and for men (2015).   Continue reading

Let BC PharmaCare hear “Your Voice” on denosumab (Prolia®) for osteoporosis in men

Cartoon man with arrowBC PharmaCare is looking for your input on denosumab (Prolia®) for the treatment of osteoporosis in men

Denosumab (Prolia®) is now being considered for coverage under the British Columbia Ministry of Health’s PharmaCare program. By filling out a questionnaire on a website called Your Voice, you can provide direct feedback about denosumab for the treatment of osteoporosis in men.

You can give input if you are a male B.C. resident living with osteoporosis, a caregiver to someone with osteoporosis, or if your group represents people who live with osteoporosis.

The input is reviewed by the Drug Benefit Council, which then gives recommendations on whether a medication should be covered, and how, by BC PharmaCare. BC PharmaCare then makes a decision based on those recommendations and available resources. Policies and plans already in place also factor in the decision making process.

It is an opportunity for you to share your perspectives on medication decisions that affect you or someone you provide care for.

Please click here to let BC PharmaCare hear Your Voice. Or, go to the following links: Continue reading

Risk factors of osteoporosis

Picture of Milk and BreadOsteoporosis is a disease characterized by low bone mass and deterioration of bone quality. This results in bones becoming thin and weak, which increases the risk of fracture as they are easy to break. It is known as the “silent thief” because bone loss occurs without any symptoms. In fact, often it is not until someone fractures a wrist, spine, rib, or hip that osteoporosis is suspected (and often it is missed even after a fragility fracture).

As many as two million Canadians have osteoporosis. One in four women, including a third of women aged 60-70 years and two thirds of women aged 80 years and older, will be diagnosed with osteoporosis.

Research shows that weight-bearing exercise, including soccer, is an effective way to reduce the amount of bone loss over time and preserve bone mass, and thus, reduce your likelihood of developing osteoporosis and having a fracture. To prepare for the FIF Women’s World Cup™ this weekend and Father’s Day, #TeamArthritis challenges you to do something that reduce your chance of getting osteoporosis.

Continue reading

Asthma increases risk of osteoporosis

X-ray of ChestThe National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute state that asthma is a chronic disease that affects more than 22 million Americans (an estimated 6 million of whom are children). On World Asthma Day, we want to remind people living with asthma that they may also be at increased risk for osteoporosis. Though asthma itself does not threaten your bone health, asthma medications and behavioural practices may affect your bones.

An asthma attack can be triggered by everyday activities, such as air pollution, dust, allergens, exercise, infections, emotional upset, or certain foods. Symptoms include coughing, wheezing, tightness in the chest, difficulty breathing, increased and rapid heart rate, and sweating. Children may experience itchy upper chest and get dry coughs. Continue reading

Demande de rétroaction d’organisations de patients sur le denosumab dans le traitement de l’ostéoporose chez l’homme

Business man on compSouffrez-vous d’ostéoporose ou prodiguez-vous des soins à quelqu’un qui en souffre ? Vos commentaires seraient précieux.

Le Programme commun d’évaluation des médicaments (PCEM) accueille actuellement les commentaires et suggestions des patients et des fournisseurs de soins sur la présentation par le fabricant du denosumab (nom générique du médicament) dans le traitement de l’ostéoporose chez l’homme. Ce médicament est actuellement approuvé par Santé Canada dans le traitement d’ostéoporose postménopausique chez la femme, avec fractures, identifiées cliniquement ou documentées par radiographie, attribuées à l’ostéoporose. Le denosumab est un médicament anti-résorption qui inhibe le développement et l’activation des ostéoclastes (les cellules qui résorbent le tissu osseux). Il est administré par injection sous-cutanée, deux fois par année. Continue reading