All posts related to "physical activity"

Working with your physiotherapist to treat your arthritis pain and symptoms

Physiotherapist helping patient with arthritis

Image courtesy of Ambro at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Working with your physiotherapist to treat your arthritis pain and symptoms

Physiotherapy is often part of a well-balanced treatment plan for many of the more than 100 types of arthritis. It focuses on maintaining, restoring or improving physical function as well as preventing and managing pain, through the use of non-medication treatments.

When choosing a physiotherapist, it is important to look for someone who has experience treating your type of arthritis, if possible. As well, it is important that you feel comfortable with your therapist, and that you relate well on a personal level.

A physiotherapist will examine your body, and assess things like joint range-of-motion, muscle strength, and swelling or instability in affected joints. A physiotherapist will also likely look at any diagnostic imaging-like x-rays-that you have had done, as well as results from any laboratory testing-for example, blood tests or joint aspirations. Finally, the therapist will want to hear from you about your symptoms, mobility, and changes in your body. Then, using the assessment above, the physiotherapist develops a treatment plan that is specifically tailored to the client’s needs. Some of the treatments used by physiotherapists include:
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Do you have Rheumatoid Arthritis or Lupus? Join the OPAM-IA study and get active!

FitBit Tracker for Active livingParticipate in a new study that will use wearable activity trackers, paired with a new web application, and physical activity counselling to help you get more active!

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are types of inflammatory arthritis that causes inflammation and deformity of the joints, and affects your immune system. Physical activity can help to decrease pain and disability in joints affected by RA and SLE while benefiting your overall health.

If you are a person living with RA or SLE, and are interested in getting more active, we invite YOU to participate in the OPAM-IA study. Through participating in the OPAM-IA study, you will learn how to get active with RA or SLE. You will be asked to attend an education session, use a Fitbit Flex activity tracker with the new web application, and receive counselling from a registered physiotherapist. The total time commitment for the study is 6 months.

If you are interested, please fill out a 2-minute screening questionnaire.All responses will remain confidential, and you will be contacted by a research staff member within 48 hours to discuss your eligibility further.

Survey Link:
http://open.arthritisresearch.ca/survey/index.php?r=survey/index/sid/455398/lang/en

For more information, contact Navi Grewal, study coordinator at 604-207-4053 or 1-844-707-4053 (toll free), or via email at opam.activity@arthritisresearch.ca.

It’s World Day for Physical Activity! Let’s deskercise!

April 6 is World Day for Physical Activity, let’s take a moment to recognize that the words “physical activity” and “outdoor” or “gym” are not synonymous. There is a perception that working at an office means being chained to your desk and inevitably becoming a “desk-potato”.

Deskercise, or desk exercises, are simple and short exercises that you can do at, or near your desk with tools available at the office or exercise gadgets you can easily bring to the office. Something as simple as walking can have significant health benefits. Walking a minimum of about 10 city blocks each day could reduce the risk of dementia, and potentially improve cardiovascular and joint health in the long term. To learn more about walking and its benefits, click here.

Woman doing arm stretch exercise

Image courtesy of David Castillo Dominici at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

Here are some ways you can exercise at work: Continue reading

Tell us how RA Matters to you

RA Matters is an international project aiming to explore what matters most to people living with RA. Using online crowdsourcing to invite participants, RA Matters asks questions about relationships, activities, work and aspirations, in order to reveal the most important aspects of day-to-day life. RA Matters aims to elevate a global conversation that sheds light on what those with RA really want and – ultimately – help them  live the best life possible.

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Is your sport likely to result in arthritis?

Arthritis: A woman doing ribbon gymnasticsRio 2016 concluded Sunday with Canada winning 4 gold medals, 3 silver medals, and 15 bronze medals. Athletes in the Olympics are passionate about the sport they love and have devoted their life to training and excelling in their sport. We should be reminded that the display of skills and excellence, though as entertaining and thrilling as they are to spectators, could result in arthritis for the athletes down the road as injuries progresses and frequency of injuries increase. In light of this, Arthritis Olympic Village would love to thank all the athletes who participated in the Olympic games. Your selfless, determined, and passionate attitude towards the sport you love is an inspiration to us all. Continue reading

Weightlifting improves strength and flexibility for arthritic joints

a picture of 2kg dumbbellsIn the Arthritis Olympic Village today, we’ll be talking about weightlifting! Dave Prowse, the actor who wore Darth Vader’s famous black mask and cape in the original Star Wars trilogy, is a former bodybuilder and British Heavyweight Weightlifting Champion living with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Did you know that lifting weights is actually one of the best ways to care for arthritic joints?

A journal published in Geriatric Nursing indicates that lifting weights can improve strength, flexibility, and balance for people with arthritis. When joints become stronger, the pain of arthritis is often reduced. Continue reading