All posts related to "physiotherapy"

A guide to living with osteoarthritis: Physiotherapy

Physiotherapy bannerPhysiotherapy as a part of your osteoarthritis treatment plan

Arthritis Consumer Experts (ACE) recently published a special edition of JointHealth™ insight for Arthritis Awareness Month in Canada. This issue featured a guide to living well with osteoarthritis and included information on the disease, diagnosis and self-care. We have created this supplemental article to highlight the importance of physiotherapy in osteoarthritis (OA) treatment.

The Canadian Physiotherapy Association describes the profession as “anchored in movement sciences and aims to enhance or restore function of multiple body systems. The profession is committed to health, lifestyle and quality of life. This holistic approach incorporates a broad range of physical and physiological therapeutic interventions and aids”.

Unlike inflammatory arthritis, there are currently no medications to treat the underlying disease process of OA. For this reason, non-medication therapies such as those provided by a physical therapist are important to help slow or stop the progression of OA and help maintain function.

How can a physiotherapist benefit you?
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EULAR News – June 16, 2018

newspaper in mail slot

The benefits of exercise in inflammatory arthritis and osteoarthritis

ACE has frequently written about the benefits of exercise in inflammatory arthritis (IA) and osteoarthritis (OA). During a series of EULAR presentations, speakers provided evidence for regular physical activity for IA and OA patients.

Anne- Kathryn Rausch, an academic from Zurich University, spoke about how general recommendations for physical activity are effective, safe and feasible for patients with ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis.
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Study Review: the power of prehabilitation when undergoing joint replacement

Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA), also known as hip/ knee replacements, are surgical procedures in which parts of the joint are replaced with artificial material to restore function and ultimately reduce pain. As an arthritis patient, if other forms of treatment have not improved the joint’s ability to function or been able to prevent additional damage, your rheumatologist may recommend arthroplasty.

A recent study conducted by a team of Canadian Physiotherapists at The University of Western Ontario has discovered valuable information regarding the impact of prehabilitative care prior to arthroplasty. The team wanted to see if education and exercises for patients before surgery (prehabilitation) impacts pain, function, strength, anxiety and length of hospital stay after surgery (post-operative outcomes).

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Working with your physiotherapist to treat your arthritis pain and symptoms

Physiotherapist helping patient with arthritis

Image courtesy of Ambro at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Working with your physiotherapist to treat your arthritis pain and symptoms

Physiotherapy is often part of a well-balanced treatment plan for many of the more than 100 types of arthritis. It focuses on maintaining, restoring or improving physical function as well as preventing and managing pain, through the use of non-medication treatments.

When choosing a physiotherapist, it is important to look for someone who has experience treating your type of arthritis, if possible. As well, it is important that you feel comfortable with your therapist, and that you relate well on a personal level.

A physiotherapist will examine your body, and assess things like joint range-of-motion, muscle strength, and swelling or instability in affected joints. A physiotherapist will also likely look at any diagnostic imaging-like x-rays-that you have had done, as well as results from any laboratory testing-for example, blood tests or joint aspirations. Finally, the therapist will want to hear from you about your symptoms, mobility, and changes in your body. Then, using the assessment above, the physiotherapist develops a treatment plan that is specifically tailored to the client’s needs. Some of the treatments used by physiotherapists include:
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What is an ACL injury?

Knee anatomy

Picture from orthoinfo.aaos.org

An ACL injury is the tear or sprain of an anterior cruciate ligament – one of the major ligaments in your knee. The cruciate ligaments are found inside your knee joint and combined, the anterior and the posterior cruciate ligaments control the back and forth motion of your knee. An ACL injury is one of the most common knee injury and often occur in athletes who play physically demanding sports like soccer, football, and basketball.

According to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, injured ligaments are considered “sprains” and are graded on a severity scale, as listed below:

  • Grade 1 Sprains – The ligament is mildly damaged in a Grade 1 Sprain. It has been slightly stretched, but is able to help keep the knee joint stable.
  • Grade 2 Sprains – A Grade 2 Sprain stretches the ligament to the point where it becomes loose. This is often referred to as a partial tear of the ligament.
  • Grade 3 Sprains – This type of sprain is most commonly referred to as a complete tear of the ligament. The ligament has been split into two pieces, and the knee joint is unstable.

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CRA Interview Series 2015 – Ms. Jennifer Burt: Model of care in Newfoundland

Canadian Rheumatology Association (CRA) and Allied Health Professions Association (AHPA) Interview Series 2015

Today’s feature interview – Ms. Jennifer Burt

ABN reporters from Canada’s arthritis consumer organizations interviewed leading health professionals and researchers during last month’s CRA and AHPA annual meetings.

Beginning March 9, feature interviews will be posted on the ABN YouTube channel http://bit.ly/ABNYouTube. Please help us raise awareness about the important work going on in Canada by sharing the interviews with your organizational and social networks.

About Ms. Jennifer Burt

Picture of Jennifer Burt

Picture from AHPA

Jennifer Burt has been a member of the Arthritis Health Professions Association (AHPA) since 2005. She has served on the Board since 2007 initially as the Newfoundland Representative and then President.

She has a Bachelor of Science in Physiotherapy from Dalhousie University and has been a Clinical Specialist in Rheumatology working on the Rheumatic Health Unit at St. Clare’s Hospital in St. John’s, Newfoundland since 1997.

Ms. Burt is also a volunteer with the Newfoundland Branch of the Arthritis Society and member of the Programs and Services Committee. Furthermore, she is a member of the Canadian Physiotherapy Association (CPA) Board of Directors. She would like to promote the benefits of AHPA.  Continue reading

CRA Interview Series 2014: Mr. Angelo Papachristos – Exercises for low back in arthritis

Arthritis Broadcast Network’s “CRA Interview Series 2014”

Consumer “reporters” interviewed more than 30 leading professionals at the Arthritis Broadcast Network Booth (ABN) during last month’s Canadian Rheumatology Association and Arthritis Health Professions annual meetings (CRA). Starting March 14, feature interviews will be posted daily on the ABN YouTube channel at http://bit.ly/ABNYouTube. We invite everyone to share the interviews with their networks to strengthen the public profile of arthritis leaders in Canada.

Today’s interview features Mr. Angelo Papachristos, an advanced practice physiotherapist at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto. Angelo talks about the difference between mechanical and inflammatory pain. He stresses on fitness conditioning and lifestyle management.