All posts related to "psoriatic arthritis"

Do you have rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis or plaque psoriasis?

Stickman with megaphone calling for patient inputCall for patient input on biosimilar infliximab (Merck) for rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis and plaque psoriasis

Do you have rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis or plaque psoriasis? We need your valuable input

Health Canada defines biosimilars as biologic medicines that are similar to, and would enter the market after, an approved originator biologic (such as Remicade®).

The Common Drug Review (CDR) is currently welcoming patients and their caregivers to provide input to patient organizations on the manufacturer’s submission for biosimilar infliximab for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis and plaque psoriasis. The originator biologic, or reference product, is infliximab (Remicade®).

The CDR is part of the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). The CDR conducts objective, rigorous reviews of the clinical and cost effectiveness of drugs, and provides formulary listing recommendations to the publicly funded drug plans in Canada (except Quebec).

To help them make their recommendations, the CDR accepts input from patient organizations and groups, like Arthritis Consumer Experts (ACE). Because patient input is vitally important to government decision-making about medications, we would like to gather your views and share them with the CDR.

These are the questions they are asking: Continue reading

Call for patient input on guselkumab for moderate to severe plaque psoriasis

Stickman with megaphone calling for patient inputDo you have moderate to severe plaque psoriasis or care for someone who does? We need your valuable input.

The Common Drug Review (CDR) is currently welcoming patients and their caregivers to provide input to patient organizations on the manufacturer’s submission for guselkumab for the treatment of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis.

Guselkumab belongs to the biologic response modifier class of inflammatory arthritis medications. It works by blocking the interleukin (IL)-23 molecule, a cytokine that plays a key role in plaque psoriasis.

The CDR is part of the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). The CDR conducts objective, rigorous reviews of the clinical and cost effectiveness of drugs, and provides formulary listing recommendations to the publicly funded drug plans in Canada (except Quebec).

To help them make their recommendations, the CDR accepts input from patient organizations and groups, like Arthritis Consumer Experts (ACE). Because patient input is vitally important to government decision-making about public reimbursement of medications, we would like to gather your views and share them with the CDR.

These are the questions they are asking: Continue reading

JointHealth™ insight – The JointHealth™ Arthritis Medications Report Card and Medications Guide Edition

Arthritis Consumer Experts’ 10th Annual Arthritis Medications Report Card and Medications Guide: The changing landscapes of reimbursement for arthritis medications in Canada

JointHealth™ insight banner on Arthritis Medications Report Card and Medications GuideArthritis Consumer Experts (ACE) has released its 10th Annual JointHealth™ Arthritis Medications Report Card and Medications Guide – the reliable, quick reference tool to help you evaluate where your province ranks in terms of providing reimbursement for medications to treat inflammatory forms of arthritis.

Commenting on the changing landscape for reimbursement of arthritis medications, ACE President, Cheryl Koehn stated: “Any new pharmaceutical policy that promises to deliver significant drug plan savings must do so without compromising patient safety and efficacy. ACE has also consistently advocated that any drug plan cost savings related to changes in policy that affect arthritis medication reimbursement access should be reinvested back to drug formulary budgets to support the listing of new arthritis medicines and other non-medication related initiatives to improve models of arthritis care such as creating rheumatology nursing billing codes.”

The JointHealth™ Arthritis Medications Report Card and Medications Guide gives you information on the most commonly prescribed medications for inflammatory types of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, axial spondyloarthritis, psoriatic arthritis or juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

In this JointHealth™ insight, topics covered include:

  • The changing landscapes of reimbursement for arthritis medications in Canada
  • The federal health department consultation on medication pricing regulations
  • The essential drugs program initiative in British Columbia
  • The Children and Youth Pharmacare plan in Ontario
  • Medication policies and politics in Canada

About the Report Card
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May is ankylosing spondylitis month! A Q&A session with Michael Mallinson

May is ankylosing spondylitis month and to celebrate, we would like to share this question and answer session Arthritis Consumer Experts did with Michael Mallinson, President of the Canadian Spondylitis Association.

Picture of Michael - President of Canadian Ankylosing Spondylitis Association

Q: Hi, Michael. Can you tell us about your organization?
A: The Canadian Spondylitis Association is a nonprofit national patient association formed in April 2006 to support and to advocate for those suffering from ankylosing spondylitis and associated spondyloarthritis diseases including psoriatic arthritis, enteropathic arthritis and reactive arthritis. Our goal is to be the leader in Canada providing support, education and advocacy for the spondyloarthritis patient community

Q: What are some misconceptions about ankylosing spondylitis?
A: Most people are unaware that AS strikes young people. The typical age of onset is between 17 and 35. Although people are aware that arthritis is a women’s disease, they are surprised when they found out AS has a significantly higher prevalence among men.
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Attention ACE members with psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis

An image of PureCare Herbal CreamHealth Canada has issued a warning about ingredients in PureCare Herbal Cream 

PureCare Herbal Cream, advertised as a natural treatment for eczema and psoriasis in children and babies, may pose serious health risks.

Health Canada testing confirmed the presence of a prescription steroid (clobetasol propionate) and another ingredient (phenoxylethanol) not declared on the product label. These ingredients may cause health effects ranging from skin irritation and dehydration to increased blood pressure. Continue reading

ACR News: Advances in psoriatic arthritis treatment and care

Picture of Dr. Laura CoatesNow that psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is viewed as its own disease entity and no longer as a relative of rheumatoid arthritis, trends in PsA care have started to change. Methotrexate has become a first-line treatment for PsA patients, and at the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) annual meeting this week, the spotlight was on new disease modifying antirheumatic agents (DMARDs) for PsA. According to Dr. Laura Coates, National Institute for Health Research Clinical Lecturer in Rheumatology at the University of Leeds, United Kingdom: “It is quite an exciting time for psoriatic arthritis because we are getting new drugs that are specific for PsA. A lot of the newer drugs focus on the Il-17 pathway, which is a different part of the patient’s immune system (than what previous medications targeted) and which seems to be particularly important for psoriatic arthritis, psoriasis, and spondylitis arthritis.”
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