All posts related to "rheumatoid arthritis"

Health Canada approves sarilumab (Kevzara®) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

Approved stamps for sarilumab for rheumatoid arthritis

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Sarilumab (Kevzara®) is now approved in Canada to treat moderate to severely active rheumatoid arthritis

Health Canada has approved a new treatment for Canadians with moderate to severely active rheumatoid arthritis. Sarilumab (Kevzara®) was issued its Notice of Compliance on January 12, 2017. Click here to view Health Canada’s Summary Basis of Decision.

Sarilumab (Kevzara®), an interleukin-6 receptor antagonist, has been approved for the treatment of adult patients with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis who have had an inadequate reponse or intolerance to one or more biologic or non-biologic Disease-Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs (DMARDs).
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Thank you Lady Gaga for speaking out about your RA pain!

Cover picture for Arthritis Magazine: Lady Gaga on her RA pain“I fought RA pain with my passion,” said Lady Gaga in the Spring 2017 issue of Arthritis magazine. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease with hallmark symptoms of inflammation and resulting pain. It is a disease process (like cancer or diabetes) where the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks its own healthy joints. It is a relatively common disease-approximately 300,000 or 1 in 100 Canadians get it-and is often devastating to a person’s body if not treated properly. The disease process causes swelling and pain in and around joints and can affect the body’s organs, including the eyes, lungs, and heart. Rheumatoid arthritis most commonly affects the hands and feet. Other joints often affected include the elbows, shoulders, neck, jaw, ankles, knees, and hips. When moderate to severe, the disease reduces a person’s life span by as much as a dozen years. To learn more about the disease, please click here.

In 2013, Lady Gaga had to cancel part of the Born This Way Ball world tour to get surgery after suffering a massive joint tear and hip breakage. At the time, she thought the pain was the result of a labral tear and an inflammatory condition called synovitis. She told Women’s Wear Daily: “My injury was actually a lot worse than just a labral tear. I had broken my hip. Nobody knew, and I haven’t even told the fans yet.” Continue reading

Patient experiences of rheumatoid arthritis models of care: An international survey

As part of an international network of RA patient organizations, Arthritis Consumer Experts invites you to participate in a global survey of RA patients to examine the diagnosis, treatment and care they receive for their RA. The goal of this survey is to understand, from the patient experience and perspective, how current “models of care” for rheumatoid arthritis compare between countries.

Global RA Network Survey BannerYour experience and perspective matter

As a person living with RA, sharing your experiences about the care you receive is vitally important. With your help, we can meet the study goals and develop education and information programs to improve patients’ understanding about RA models of care to enable the best treatment outcomes possible in Canada.

How you can participate

If you agree to participate, you will be asked to answer a survey questionnaire, which should take approximately 10 minutes to complete. All the information gathered during the survey will be combined to protect your privacy and anonymity.

To be eligible to participate in this survey, you must:

  • Be 18 years of age or older
  • Receive health care in Canada
  • Have access to the internet

Thank you for considering our request to participate in this survey. Your participation will help you and other people living with RA in your country know more about the health care they should be receiving.

Please click here to complete the survey.

Let BC PharmaCare hear “Your Voice” on sarilumab

Stickman with megaphone calling for Your Voice patient inputBC PharmaCare is looking for your input on sarilumab for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

Sarilumab (Kevzara™) is a fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, a protein central to the development of the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. Sarilumab can be used alone or in combination with methotrexate or other traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). It is given by subcutaneous (under the skin) injection. The drug is now being considered for coverage under the British Columbia Ministry of Health’s PharmaCare program.  Continue reading

Cold hands are one of several warning signs of Raynaud’s Phenomenon

Close up of girl wearing mittens - way to prevent Raynaud'sRaynaud’s phenomenon is a condition in which there is an exaggerated blood vessel tightening in response to cold or emotional stress, restricting blood flow to certain areas of the body – most often the fingers, but sometimes the toes, ears, or the end of the nose.

The exaggerated vascular response (tightening) in Raynaud’s phenomenon is called vasospasm, which often occur in response to cold or emotional stress. With vasospasm, the fingers turn white and cold then blue with dilated veins followed by relaxation of the vessel and normal blood flow causing a red ‘flushing’

According to a recent article published in The New England Journal of Medicine, Raynaud’s affects approximately 3 to 5 percent of the population – women are more often affected than men. Raynaud’s phenomenon occurs in two forms – primary and secondary. Primary is the most common and has no underlying cause. Secondary is when Raynaud’s phenomenon occurs in combination with another autoimmune disease like scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome or systemic lupus erythematous. The article also states that people who work with certain chemicals, like vinyl chloride, or vibrating tools like a jackhammer are also susceptible to secondary Raynaud’s. Continue reading

Call for patient input on biosimilar etanercept (Sandoz) for RA, AS, and pJIA

Stickman with megaphone calling for patient inputDo you have rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis or polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis or care for someone who does? We need your valuable input.

Health Canada defines biosimilars (sometimes referred to as subsequent entry biologics or SEBs) as biologic medicines that are similar to, and would enter the market after, an approved originator biologic (such as Enbrel®).

Unlike the more common small-molecule drugs, biologics generally exhibit high molecular complexity, and are sensitive to changes in manufacturing practices. Biosimilars are not identical to their originator products because their chemical characteristics cannot be precisely duplicated during the manufacturing process. Therefore, biosimilars may have unique efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety profiles that are different from their originator.

The Common Drug Review (CDR) is currently welcoming patients and their caregivers to provide input to patient organizations on the manufacturer’s submission for biosimilar etanercept for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The originator biologic, or reference product, is etanercept (Enbrel®).
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