All posts related to "rheumatology"

ACR News 1 – October 21, 2018

newspaper in mail slotMore than 15,000 clinicians, researchers, academics, patient advocates and arthritis health professionals from more than 100 countries are expected to gather at the American College of Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals 2018 Annual Meeting over the next six days in Chicago to exchange scientific and clinical information.

This year’s ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting will include 450 educational sessions. More than 700 speakers hailing from more than 20 countries will present as many as 3,000 abstracts to gain firsthand knowledge and access to new scientific and clinical findings.

Session topics will include newly proposed treatments for systemic lupus erythematosus and osteoarthritis, updated classification criteria for large vessel vasculitis and a look at current controversies regarding arthritis diseases and bone.
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Surrey Inflammatory Arthritis Clinic: innovative, convenient, informative

Ask for your rheumatologist’s referral to make an appointment at the clinic! 

The recently opened Surrey Inflammatory Arthritis (IA) Clinic is located at the Surrey Memorial Hospital and provides services for people living with inflammatory arthritis. The clinic has therapists (occupational therapy and physical therapy) who are specifically trained to help you manage and treat the physical and mental impacts of rheumatoid arthritis.

Sarah Bryant, an occupational therapist at the Surrey IA Clinic, explains her work relationship with the clinic’s physical therapist: “We work in a transdisciplinary model, which means that we both train each other in the basics of our profession in rheumatology and that if you have something really specific to the discipline, you can see either one of us, as needed.” This transdisciplinary approach eliminates the stress associated with multiple visits to the clinic.

The services provided at the clinic are publicly funded and available for people living with inflammatory arthritis who are:

  • 18 years of age or older
  • diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis within the last two years
  • living in the Fraser Health region
  • have a rheumatologist’s referral to the Surrey IA Clinic

This video provides general information about what you should expect when you visit an occupational or physical therapist at the Surrey IA Clinic. For more information about the clinic or to schedule an appointment, please call 604-585-5666 (extension 778778).

To subscribers who live outside of British Columbia:

If you know of a clinic in your area of Canada that offers a similar program, please email us at feedback@jointhealth.org so that we may share it on our resources page.

“Nothing About Me, Without Me” – Patient Engagement in Research

Patient engagement in research or patient-oriented research refers to patients, their family members and other informal caregivers partaking in research as more than study participants but as members of the research team. For example, involving patients in some or all parts of the research process from deciding what topic is studied, to how the research is conducted to how the findings are presented and used.

Partnering with patients ensures that health research is both relevant and meaningful to the patient community. For example, in rheumatology, patients’ perspectives have been instrumental in broadening the scope of the research agenda to include more patient-relevant factors such as well-being, fatigue and sleep patterns. These are significant aspects of life with inflammatory forms of arthritis, yet until recently the topics were largely ignored or underrepresented in research and outcome measurement. This example depicts why patient engagement is so critical. If researchers do not work with patients how can they know what they are studying is relevant to the population that will be most affected by it? It is in this context that the saying “nothing about me, without me” applies so strongly. Other benefits of patient engagement include enhanced quality of research with more perspectives considered, meaningful role(s) for patients and greater involvement in their communities, co-learning between patient and researchers as well as getting important research findings to a broader audience. Overall, patient engagement is a promising way to improve healthcare services and patient experience.

Model of patient engagement in research by Clayon

Figure that summarizes the components of meaningful patient engagement in research from a patient perspective. Developed by the PIERS Project Team

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It’s National Nurses Week! Nurses play a big role in rheumatology care

On National Nurses Week, we want to thank you to all the nurses in the world!

Picture of nurses from American Nurses Association

Picture of nurses from American Nurses Association

Nurses play a major multidisciplinary role in health education and management of arthritis in the community. Patients living with extensive joint damage need ongoing treatment, care, and monitoring, along with motivation and instructions to adhere to prescribed drug therapies. The best way to do so is through a multidisciplinary approach where a varied healthcare team is made available to the patient. This team may include a rheumatologist, rheumatology nurse, registered nurse, pharmacist, physical therapist, occupational therapist, podiatrist, physician assistant, social worker, dietician, and counsellor. To ensure optimal physical, psychological, and social functioning and quality of life, the team provides education and support based on the patient’s goals.

Nurses can help patients manage and coordinate the plan of care established by their rheumatologist. We have outlined the role of the nurse in the disease journey below. Are you a nurse practitioner? Email us at feedback@jointhealth.org and tell us what you do to help patients!

Initial assessment

During the initial assessment, a nurse can help alleviate a patient’s anxiety, anger, frustration, and depression by establishing a therapeutic relationship with the patient and his or her caregiver. Nurses can also assess the patient and caregiver’s understanding of the disease and its management, and evaluate their physical, emotional, and psychological well-being. Continue reading

#CRArthritis Speaker’s Corner – The road to become a rheumatologist

A screen capture of Cheryl Koehn and future rheumatologist Kelsey ChomistekIn 2008, a rheumatology workforce analysis report published by the American College of Rheumatology Workforce Study Advisory Group concluded:

Based on assessment of supply and demand under current scenarios, the demand for rheumatologists is expected to exceed supply in the coming decades. Strategies for the profession to adapt to this changing health care landscape include increasing the number of fellows each year, utilizing physician assistants and nurse practitioners in greater numbers, and improving practice efficiency.

Fast forward to 2015

The 2015 ACR/ARHP Workforce Study of Rheumatology Specialists in the United States projects a shortage of 3,845 rheumatologists in the U.S. by 2025, an increase from the 2005 ACR Workforce Study, which projected a shortage of 2,576 rheumatologists. Reasons for the shortage include: Continue reading

MedPage Today names top 2016 advances in rheumatology

A group of people jumping up in the air on a beachMedPage Today interviewed specialists in rheumatology in the United States about the advances in rheumatology in 2016. Below are the five most common advances mentioned.

1. Tocilizumab (Actemra) for the treatment of giant cell arteritis 

Giant cell arteritis affects over 200,000 people in the United States. Research data from an international clinical trial showed that after a year of treatment, 56% of the 250 study participants given tocilizumab weekly plus prednisone were in sustained remission, compared with just 14% of those given placebo alone (P<0.0001).

At the annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), Dr. John H. Stone of Harvard University at Boston noted: “There is something new in giant cell arteritis at last, and the era of unending glucocorticoid treatment with no viable alternative is over.” Continue reading

Canadians recognized at 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting

Congratulations to Dr. Carter Thorne and Dr. Claire Bombardier!

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) announced the 2016 recipients of its Master of the ACR designation and Distinguished Fellow Award honours during the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington D.C. These recognitions are given annually to members who exhibit outstanding contributions to the field of rheumatology.

drcarterthorneDr. Carter Thorne receives Master of the ACR designation
ACE wishes to congratulate Carter Thorne, MD, FRCPC, FACP, Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario, Canada/ University of Toronto, for recognition as a Master – one of the highest honors that the ACR awards to its members. The designation of Master is conferred on ACR members, age 65 or older, who have made outstanding contributions to the field of rheumatology through scholarly achievement and/or service to their patients, students, and the rheumatology profession. These honorees have devoted their long careers to furthering rheumatology research and improving clinical standards in the treatment of rheumatic diseases.
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Happy 155th Birthday Nettie Stevens!

Happy 155th Birthday to Nettie Stevens!

science students workingGoogle paid a tribute to Nettie Stevens today. Stevens was a pioneering American female geneticist and one of the first to be recognized for her contribution to science. She had a brief career as a high school teacher for physiology and zoology before becoming a scientist. As a scientist, Stevens published about 40 papers and is credited for her success in expanding the field of embryology and genetics.

Do you have a favourite science teacher or researcher in your life? Share your stories about how this person inspires you.  Continue reading

CRA Interview Series 2015 – Dr. Hani El-Gabalawy: Preventing rheumatoid arthritis

Canadian Rheumatology Association (CRA) and Allied Health Professions Association (AHPA) Interview Series 2015

Today’s feature interview – Dr. Hani El-Gabalawy: Preventing rheumatoid arthritis. What we’ll need to know before we start navigating uncharted territory.

ABN reporters from Canada’s arthritis consumer organizations interviewed leading health professionals and researchers during last month’s CRA and AHPA annual meetings.

Beginning March 9, feature interviews will be posted on the ABN YouTube channel http://bit.ly/ABNYouTube. Please help us raise awareness about the important work going on in Canada by sharing the interviews with your organizational and social networks.

About Dr. Hani El-Gabalawy

Picture of Dr. El-Gabalawy

Photo from IMHA

Dr. El-Gabalawy is an internationally recognized rheumatologist and Professor of Medicine and Immunology and senior clinician scientist at the University of Manitoba. He is also the Endowed Rheumatology Research Chair at the university and Scientific Director of the Institute of Musculoskeletal Health and Arthritis.  Continue reading

CRA Interview Series 2015 – Mr. Tristan Kerr on juvenile arthritis

Canadian Rheumatology Association (CRA) and Allied Health Professions Association (AHPA) Interview Series 2015

Today’s feature interview – Mr. Tristan Kerr – The risk of growth retardation and obesity in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) treated with contemporary treatments: Results from the ReACCh-OUT Cohort

ABN reporters from Canada’s arthritis consumer organizations interviewed leading health professionals and researchers during last month’s CRA and AHPA annual meetings.

Beginning March 9, feature interviews will be posted on the ABN YouTube channel http://bit.ly/ABNYouTube. Please help us raise awareness about the important work going on in Canada by sharing the interviews with your organizational and social networks. Continue reading