All posts related to "walk10blocks"

It’s World Day for Physical Activity! Let’s deskercise!

April 6 is World Day for Physical Activity, let’s take a moment to recognize that the words “physical activity” and “outdoor” or “gym” are not synonymous. There is a perception that working at an office means being chained to your desk and inevitably becoming a “desk-potato”.

Deskercise, or desk exercises, are simple and short exercises that you can do at, or near your desk with tools available at the office or exercise gadgets you can easily bring to the office. Something as simple as walking can have significant health benefits. Walking a minimum of about 10 city blocks each day could reduce the risk of dementia, and potentially improve cardiovascular and joint health in the long term. To learn more about walking and its benefits, click here.

Woman doing arm stretch exercise

Image courtesy of David Castillo Dominici at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

Here are some ways you can exercise at work: Continue reading

Frequent, brisk walks are beneficial for people with early-stage Alzheimer’s

Picture of person walking - feet onlyAccording to a recent study of physical activity as an experimental treatment for dementia, frequent, brisk walks are beneficial for people with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease because walking bolsters physical abilities and slow memory loss.

The study aimed to investigate how and why exercise helps some people with dementia, but not others. There are 1.1 million Canadians who are directly or indirectly affected by dementia. Globally, the disease affects more than 35 million people, a number that is expected to double within 20 years. There are currently no reliable treatments for the disease.

Past studies which focused on how exercise can prevent Alzheimer’s disease have shown the following:

  • There is a strong correlation between regular exercise and improved memories in healthy elderly people.
  • Physical active older people are less likely than those who are sedentary to develop mild cognitive impairment (a common precursor to Alzheimer’s disease).
  • When compared to sedentary people of the same age, physically fit older people have more volume in their brain’s hippocampus, the portion of the brain most intimately linked to memory function.

For the current study, researchers from the University of Kansas decided to work with people who had been given a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Because the disease can affect coordination as it progresses, the study initially looked at men and women with early stage Alzheimer. Study participants had to be living at home and be able to safely walk by themselves or perform other types of light exercise.

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Walk10Blocks helps get sedentary people moving

The Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute published a news article about the Walk10Blocks app, commenting how researcher-consumer-patient group collaboration can facilitate knowledge translation. The Walk10Blocks team thanks the Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute and other groups for sharing the Walk10Blocks app with their network.

Below is an excerpt of the article:

Researcher-consumer-patient Group Collaboration Facilitates Knowledge Translation

Two people walking with Walk10Blocks app on mobile phoneWalk10Blocks helps get sedentary people moving.

The development process behind a new app to help sedentary people get moving shows how unique partnerships between researchers, consumers, and patient groups can lead to innovative health research. Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (VCHRI) scientists Dr. Linda Li and Dr. Teresa Liu-Ambrose credit the collaboration between themselves and consumer and patient groups, including Arthritis Consumer Experts, the Alzheimer Society of B.C., and CARP (the Canadian Association of Retired Persons), for the development of the Walk10Blocks app.

Dr. Linda Li, professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of British Columbia and Canada Research Chair in Patient-Oriented Knowledge Translation at UBC and Arthritis Research Canada. 

“We’re very proud of this collaboration. It’s a perfect example of how researchers getting together with patient and public groups can come up with innovative ideas and actually make things happen,” says Dr. Li.

“I’ve built apps before for other research projects and it usually takes a very long time. Walk10Blocks only took one year from conception to testing launch in the community. When consumer and patient groups are involved–they know what works and they’re really driven to get things done fast and done right.”

Walk10Blocks is the first app designed specifically to help adults get over the hurdle of starting regular physical activity by encouraging them to walk 10 blocks a day (or about one kilometre per day), which according to research may help delay or minimize risk of dementia and improve cardiovascular and joint health over time. 

Walk10Blocks, which is currently available for free on iTunes, can be installed on an iPhone 5S or above. The app uses the phone’s core motion sensor to collect data about a person’s movement activity. The app converts this activity into a walking log, which tracks the distance travelled throughout the day and how many theoretical city blocks have been covered. The goal is to encourage sedentary people to walk at least 10 blocks per day. The app offers motivating, friendly alerts, has easy-to-read measurements, helps set reasonable walking goals, and awards badges for meeting goals.

By downloading the app, Walk10Blocks participants have also agreed to take part in an innovative research study that uses the app to collect data through surveys. Information gathered for the study includes patients’ fatigue, pain, mood, stress, and walk ratings to give researchers a better understanding of what individuals’ walking opportunities look like. The study also aims to help users recognize and understand their own physical activity levels and sedentary behaviour, create awareness about neighbourhood resources, and determine the overall feasibility of the app.

Development of the app started with one of Drs. Li and Liu-Ambrose’s research groups consulting with patient groups and receiving a grant from the Improving Cognitive and Joint Health Network (ICON), a Canadian Institutes of Health Research knowledge translation catalyst network.

“What we heard loud and clear through our consultations was a desire for more efficient, effective use of what we know about physical activity and its health benefits in terms of managing diseases, especially for people whose health may worsen without it.”

Early on, the groups met with Dr. Liu-Ambrose, researcher at the Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health and the Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, who shared with them current evidence with relation to exercise and cognitive function. According to Dr. Li, the group was most interested in findings from a nine-year observational study in the U.S. that showed that walking approximately 10 city-sized blocks results in better cognition and better brains.

“That specific information had our consumer groups almost jumping for joy because to them it was finally something concrete that could be used and brought back to stakeholder groups as the minimum amount of physical activity you needed to do for positive effect,” according to Dr. Li.

Dr. Liu-Ambrose, who is also Canada Research Chair in Physical Activity, Mobility, and Cognitive Neuroscience, says the group got quite motivated by the idea that you don’t necessarily need to run a marathon to have a positive impact on brain health. “This led to the concept of the app and Cheryl Koehn, president of Arthritis Consumer Experts and head of our arthritis patient group, really has been the driving force behind it.”

“The evidence is accumulating to suggest that exercise is beneficial–but where there is a void is how to put it into action. The app is a bit of that component,” she adds. “When everyone has a common goal and shared interests, I think that’s when we make good progress.”

“And so in many ways, recommending regular activities, such as moderately paced walking, seems to be a pretty reasonable approach for promoting physical and cognitive health over the lifespan.”

Centre for Brain Health: Walk10Blocks Makes it Easier for Sedentary Adults to Get Moving

Thank you to the Centre for Brain Health for publishing an article about the Walk10Blocks app. Let’s start walking!

Below is an excerpt from the Centre for Brain Health:

WALK10BLOCKS MAKES IT EASIER FOR SEDENTARY ADULTS TO GET MOVING

“Exercise” as a concept can be hard to wrap your head around – how much is enough? How do you know you’re doing it correctly? And how do you begin? Fortunately, a new app promises to put older adults on the right path. By walking just ten blocks (roughly one kilometer) per day, app users will meet their daily activity goals; they’ll also find the support, tools and tips they need to keep going.

Walk10Blocks was a collaborative effort inspired by the research of Dr. Teresa Liu-Ambrose(Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health and the Centre for Hip Health & Mobility) and Dr. Linda Li (Arthritis Research Canada). The idea to develop an app as a way of driving awareness around the cognitive and joint health benefits of walking – and to use mobile technology to collect research data in a new way – came from Knowledge User Team lead Arthritis Consumer Experts, and its partners, the Alzheimer Society of BC, and the Canadian Association of Retired Persons.

Scientific guidance from Drs. Liu-Ambrose and Li, along with leading physiotherapy researchers, and digital tech leadership from the Centre for Digital Media, ensured that the Walk10Blocks app was not only user friendly, but would help advance research into cognitive and joint health in a meaningful way.

“Our advice to start with ten blocks is meant to give people a concrete first step, so to speak, towards daily physical activity,” says Dr. Liu-Ambrose. “We wanted to give users a straightforward goal to start, which they would be able to confidently build on. Research shows that walking just ten blocks per day can have neuroprotective benefits as many as nine years later – Walk10Blocks makes it easy to take the first steps toward improved cognition and joint and cardiovascular health.”

“The magic ingredients of the Walk10Blocks app project are its user driven conceptualization and design paired with hard science,” says Cheryl Koehn, Founder and President of Arthritis Consumer Experts, Canada’s largest arthritis patient organization. “The Walk10Blocks app is the first that uses Apple’s ResearchKit platform and pairs user-designed features with a research study, giving the user health benefits long after the study is concluded. I think that’s a really important part of this project: helping sedentary people start walking and practicing healthy behaviour.”

Recent research from Dr. Liu-Ambrose showed that exercising – including walking – just three hours per week may help preserve memory function in older adults with existing cognitive impairments.

For more information about Walk10Blocks, visit walk10blocks.caDownload Walk10Blocks for free from the App Store.

This research was made possible through funding from Improving Cognitive & jOint health Network(ICON), a CIHR knowledge translation catalyst network. 

Take a walk with the Walk10Blocks app!

Walk10Blocks logoDo you need help meeting the basic daily exercise requirement? If you do, then Walk10Blocks is the app
for you! 

We all know walking is good for your health. Research shows that even walking 10 city blocks a day, equivalent to about 2,000 – 3,000 steps or 1 km, can help delay dementia and may help improve cardiovascular and joint health over time.

Arthritis Consumer Experts has partnered with Canadian Association for Retired Persons (CARP) and Alzheimer’s Society of BC to develop an easy-to-use iPhone app to help people become more physically active through walking called “Walk10Blocks.” This innovative project is supported by ICON (Improving Cognitive & Joint Health Network), a 3-year knowledge translation network research study funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. To learn more about the project, please click here.

Arthritis Consumer Experts is looking for people to join the “Walk10Blocks” community. To start walking, all you need is an iPhone 5s or 6 and five minutes of your time every other day to answer brief survey questions about your experience using the app.

To download the “Walk10Blocks” app, please click here.

Qu’est-ce que le comité ACE a fait pour vous dernièrement ?

Qu’est-ce que le comité ACE a fait pour vous dernièrement ?

Voici quelques faits saillants survenus au cours du mois de la sensibilisation envers l’arthrite au Canada.

Vote XVOTEZ pour l’arthrite !

La prestation des soins de santé est peut-être une responsabilité provinciale, mais le gouvernement fédéral n’en joue pas moins un rôle important dans le financement des soins de santé et l’élaboration des politiques en santé.

Pour permettre à nos membres et abonnés de comparer les différentes plateformes en matière de soins de santé, nous avons posé au Parti conservateur du Canada, au Nouveau Parti démocratique, au Parti libéral du Canada et au Parti vert du Canada les mêmes quatre questions sur les problèmes majeurs auxquels font face les Canadiennes et Canadiens atteints d’arthrite. Le comité ACE affiche leurs réponses sur son site WebContinue reading