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Canadian Rheumatology Research Consortium Arthritis Research Centre of Canada Arthritis Consumer Experts

Have you started talking about biologic medications for Rheumatoid Arthritis with your doctor?

Super Study bannerThe latest online tool to help make your treatment decisions.

We are looking for people to participate in a study to determine the usefulness of a web-based program designed to aid people with rheumatoid arthritis in making decisions to start or switch biologics.

If you have started discussing STARTING OR SWITCHING BIOLOGICS with your doctor, we invite you to participate in this study.

You may be eligible if you:

  1. Have a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis
  2. See a rheumatologist
  3. Have started discussing switching or starting biologic medication with your doctor
  4. Have a valid email and internet access

This study can be completed from home or anywhere with internet access. Any information you provide will be completely confidential. An honorarium will be provided for your time.

If you would like more information, please contact Jasmina Geldman, Research Coordinator by phone at 604-207-4007, toll free 1-877-871-4575, or email jgeldman@arthritisresearch.ca. Please also visit our UBC Study Website for more information.

SPINACH-project: SupPortIng seNiors And Caregivers to stay mobile at Home

SPINACH-project: SupPortIng seNiors And Caregivers to stay mobile at Home

Participants sought for short evaluation of online module with options how to stay independent at home when aging

A picture of two seniors

 

Decisions about how to stay independent at home are difficult ones for seniors, and we often hear that they do not know what their options are to do so.

We have created an online module (webpage) for seniors and caregivers who are facing decisions (with their health professionals) about how to stay independent at home. We are currently looking for seniors and caregivers that are willing to have a look at our module (as long as you like), and fill out a one-time questionnaire with your evaluation of it (10-15 minutes). With your help we can improve the module to meet your needs.  Continue reading

ACR News: Advances in psoriatic arthritis treatment and care

Picture of Dr. Laura CoatesNow that psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is viewed as its own disease entity and no longer as a relative of rheumatoid arthritis, trends in PsA care have started to change. Methotrexate has become a first-line treatment for PsA patients, and at the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) annual meeting this week, the spotlight was on new disease modifying antirheumatic agents (DMARDs) for PsA. According to Dr. Laura Coates, National Institute for Health Research Clinical Lecturer in Rheumatology at the University of Leeds, United Kingdom: “It is quite an exciting time for psoriatic arthritis because we are getting new drugs that are specific for PsA. A lot of the newer drugs focus on the Il-17 pathway, which is a different part of the patient’s immune system (than what previous medications targeted) and which seems to be particularly important for psoriatic arthritis, psoriasis, and spondylitis arthritis.”
Continue reading

ACR News: Aboriginal community could provide clues in understanding arthritis for all consumers

Picture of Dr. Hani El GabalawyACE is sharing the latest research news from this year’s American College of Rheumatology annual meeting (ACR) in Washington, DC. 

The ACR is a gathering of more than 16,000 arthritis researcher, clinicians and patients from around the world to discuss the newest science about arthritis prevention, care and treatment. This week ACE will share the daily news from the ACR and interviews with arthritis leaders making a difference for you.

Arthritis can affect aboriginal people in North America differently than other ethnic groups. At a clinical symposium at the ACR – Rheumatic Diseases in Native Americans: What Can We Learn, How Can We Help? – conference attendees heard how the unique responses of aboriginal populations to arthritis have lessons for the rest of the arthritis community. Continue reading

Social networking and disease management in arthritis

Effects of Social Networking on Chronic Disease Management in Arthritis

Do you have rheumatoid arthritis? Sign up for the Social Networking for Arthritis Patients (SNAP) study now.

SNAP BannerThe Social Networking for Arthritis Patients (SNAP) study is funded by The Rheumatology Research Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to research to improve the health of people with arthritis. Throughout the study, you will be having social interactions with patient representatives from The Arthritis Foundation, The International Foundation for Autoimmune Arthritis and The Arthritis Society. You may qualify for the study if you:

  • Are 18 years or older
  • Have been diagnosed by a doctor as having rheumatoid arthritis for 10 years or less
  • Have an email address
  • Able to communicate in English
  • Are comfortable with using the internet
  • Are familiar with social media
  • Live in the United States of America or Canada

Your participation would be online only and you will receive compensation for your time and effort. Your expected time commitment is 6 months. The participant will be asked to access webpages and complete online questionnaires at three time points.Do you have rheumatoid arthritis? Sign up for the Social Networking for Arthritis Patients (SNAP) study now.

This study is being conducted by investigators at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. To find out if you are eligible to participate, contact Jessica, research coordinator, at 1(713)563-8817 or email snaparthritis@gmail.com.

New blood test could provide early diagnosis of osteoarthritis

Picture of Dr. Naila Rabbani

Source: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/newsandevents/pressreleases/blood_test_for/

Researchers at the University of Warwick have developed a new blood test to diagnosis early-stage arthritis years before the onset of physical and irreversible symptoms. The study, published in the journal Arthritis Research and Therapy, states that the test provides early diagnosis of osteoarthritis (OA). The test can distinguish between early OA and early-stage rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other self-resolving inflammatory joint diseases.

The test identifies the chemical signatures found in the plasma of blood joint proteins damaged by oxidation, nitration and glycation (the modification of proteins with oxygen, nitrogen and sugar molecules). Continue reading