Groundbreaking research. Life-changing discoveries.

Younger patients getting knees and hips replaced. Is this an additional burden on the healthcare system?

New research shows that patients undergoing total joint replacement are younger now than they were in 2000. According to a review from the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database, the average patient undergoing a total hip replacement (THR) in 2014 was 64.9 years, while the average patient in 2000 was 66.3 years. In parallel, the average patient undergoing a total knee replacement (TKR) was 65.9 in 2014, and 68.0 in 2000.

Dr. Matthew Sloan, lead researcher and orthopaedic resident at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, tells Reuters Health by email: “These differences may not seem like much, but an average decrease of two years in a pool of 1 million people is a significant difference. It’s also a meaningful difference when you take into account the fact that these total joint replacements have a finite lifespan.”

Dr. Sloan further explains: “The technology for total hip and knee replacements continues to improve. However, at some point, the implant wears out. We believe modern implants without any unforeseen complications should last 20 years or more. The problem with an increasingly younger group of patients having these procedures, it becomes more likely that the implant will wear out during their lifetime. When this happens, a second surgery is required to revise the joint replacement. These procedures are not as successful as the initial surgeries, they are bigger operations, they take longer, and now the patient is 20 years older and not as strong as they were when they had the initial procedure.”

Because a second surgery is riskier and prone to complications like early failure or infection, the goal is to wait as long as possible so that a patient will undergo one surgery in their life. Other findings presented at the American Society of Orthopaedic Surgeon’s annual meeting include: Continue reading

Study participants needed to evaluate an online pain self-management program

The University of Regina is looking for participants to evaluate an online pain self-management program, completed with Do-It-Yourself Guides, Stories and Additional Resources. 

The University of Regina is seeking seniors to enroll in a research study to evaluate a pain self-management program for older adults(www.onlinetherapyuser.ca/olderadults). This program is only offered in English.

Picture of a computer for online programThe research study is led by Thomas Hadjistavropoulos, Ph.D., Professor and Research Chair in Aging and Health, University of Regina. The purpose of this study is to explore the acceptability and effectiveness of a remotely-delivered chronic pain management program tailored to older adults, the Pain Course, when delivered in both online and printed (workbook) formats.

This program requires a 3-month commitment, as participants will have 2 months to work through the course material with a 4-week follow-up period.

Recruitment will take place across Canada and participants will be eligible for the study if they:

  1. are a resident of Canada
  2. are 65 years of age or older
  3. have experienced pain for more than three months
  4. do not have severe depression or anxiety
  5. have regular access to a computer and the internet

Potential participants will be required to complete a preliminary screening and telephone assessment. If participants meet the inclusion criteria, they will be required to complete questionnaires at pre-treatment, post-treatment and 4-week follow-up.

The course includes 5 Core Lessons over a 2-month period, along with Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Guides, Stories and Additional Resources that will be available throughout this period.

If you are interested in joining the chronic pain self-management program for older adults, please follow the link below to complete the preliminary screening: http://uregina.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_ePPMuUKJBXM5jtr

The deadline for potential participants to sign up is Wednesday, April 4th. If you want to learn more about the study, please email Ainsley, the primary researcher, at aam549@uregina.ca.

Study Review: the power of prehabilitation when undergoing joint replacement

Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA), also known as hip/ knee replacements, are surgical procedures in which parts of the joint are replaced with artificial material to restore function and ultimately reduce pain. As an arthritis patient, if other forms of treatment have not improved the joint’s ability to function or been able to prevent additional damage, your rheumatologist may recommend arthroplasty.

A recent study conducted by a team of Canadian Physiotherapists at The University of Western Ontario has discovered valuable information regarding the impact of prehabilitative care prior to arthroplasty. The team wanted to see if education and exercises for patients before surgery (prehabilitation) impacts pain, function, strength, anxiety and length of hospital stay after surgery (post-operative outcomes).

Continue reading

Researchers need your help to determine the best way to invite patients to participate in their study!

The study will be on the risk of damage to vision related to taking hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) or chloroquine (CQ) in Canadians living with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis.

The research team at Arthritis Research Canada and the University of British Columbia want to do research to:

  • Accurately determine the risk of damage to vision related to taking HCQ or CQ in Canadians living with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA)
  • Provide annual vision testing to approximately 3,000 patients with SLE or RA who have been taking HCQ or CQ for more than 5 years

The research team will use a state-of-the-art vision testing method that can detect any signs of damage to vision at an earlier stage before the damage is irreversible. The researchers need your help in designing this research project. They want your opinion about the best way to invite patients to participate in this study:

  • Option 1
    The research team will send a letter to the patients who have SLE or RA and have been taking HCQ or CQ for more than 5 years. The letter will ask the patient to ask their doctor (family doctor or rheumatologist) to send a referral to see an ophthalmologist for the vision tests.
  • Option 2
    The research team contacts the family doctor or rheumatologist directly and requests that the doctor tells their patients with SLE and RA about the study and sends a referral to the ophthalmologist.

Click on this survey link to select your preferred option.

More information about damage to vision related to taking HCQ and CQ

Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), also known as Plaquenil, and Chloroquine (CQ), are inexpensive anti-malarial drugs commonly used to manage symptoms of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) because it has been shown to prevent “flares” (episodes when symptoms worsen), prevent disease progression, and help people live longer.

Most drugs have some unwanted ‘side-effects’, such as causing nausea. Research shows that taking HCQ or CQ for long period of time can affect vision, and if not detected on time, it may lead to damages to a patient’s vision. It is recommended that people taking HCQ or CQ for 5 years or more should have their vision tested by an ophthalmologist every year using new technology that detects early changes before they are irreversible.

A recent study by Arthritis Research Canada found that about 40% of those who should have had their vision tested had not had the test within the past 5 years – it was even worse (almost 70% didn’t have their vision tested) if they were not being cared for by a rheumatologist.

Do you have Rheumatoid Arthritis or Lupus? Join the OPAM-IA study!

Participate in a new study that will use wearable activity trackers, paired with a new web application, and physical activity counselling to help you get more active!

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are types of inflammatory arthritis that causes inflammation and> deformity of the joints, and affects your immune system. Physical activity can help to decrease pain and disability in joints affected by RA and SLE while benefiting your overall health.

woman with rheumatoid arthritis looking at physical activity trackerIf you are a person living with RA or SLE, and are interested in getting more active, we invite YOU to participate in the OPAM-IA study. Through participating in the OPAM-IA study, you will learn how to get active with RA or SLE. You will be asked to attend an education session in Metro Vancouver, use a Fitbit Flex activity tracker with the new web application, and receive counselling from a registered physiotherapist. The total time commitment for the study is 6 months. Enrol now to start in January 2018!

If you are interested, please fill out a 2-minute screening questionnaire.All responses will remain confidential, and you will be contacted by a research staff member within 48 hours to discuss your eligibility further.

Survey Link: http://open.arthritisresearch.ca/survey/index.php?r=survey/index/sid/455398/lang/en.

For more information, contact Halima Elmi, study coordinator at 604-207-4053 or 1-844-707-4053 (toll free), or via email at opam.activity@arthritisresearch.ca.

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Had your flu shot yet?

picture of woman getting a flu shotThe latest flu season facts and autoimmune arthritis – A “must” readIf you have not had your flu shot yet, read this “hot off the press” news from the American College of Rheumatology Annual Scientific Meeting presented yesterday in San Diego, California:Temporary Methotrexate Discontinuation for 2 Weeks Improves Immunogenicity of Seasonal Influenza Vaccination in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.People with rheumatoid arthritis who stop taking methotrexate treatment for just two weeks after they have a seasonal flu shot can improve the vaccine’s efficacy without increasing rheumatoid arthritis disease activity.

Knee pain? Join the SuPRA study and get active!

Knee pain? Join the SuPRA study and get active!

Participate in a new study that will use wearable activity trackers, paired with a new web application, and physical activity counselling to help you get more active!

Picture of runner's leg from knee to feet Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of chronic pain and disability. Physical activity can help to decrease pain and disability in joints affected by OA while benefiting your overall health.

If you are a person living with knee pain or knee OA, and interested in getting more active, we invite YOU to participate in the SuPRA study. Through participating in SuPRA you will learn how to get active with knee OA. You will be asked to attend an education session, use a Fitbit Flex activity tracker with the new web application, and receive counselling from a registered physiotherapist. The total time commitment for the study is 9 months. Enrol now to start in January 2018!

If you are interested, please fill out a 3-minute screening questionnaire.All responses will remain confidential, and you will be contacted by a research staff member within 48 hours to discuss your eligibility further.

Survey Link: http://open.arthritisresearch.ca/survey/index.php?r=survey/index/sid/143586/lang/en.

For more information, contact Halima Elmi, Research Coordinator at 604-207-4053 or 1-844-707-4053, or via email at supra.activity@arthritisresearch.ca.

University of British Columbia Survey: Running and knee osteoarthritis

University of British Columbia Survey: Running and knee osteoarthritis

What do the public and healthcare professionals think about the effects of running on knee joint health?

Male jogger’s leg to represent knee OA survey

This online survey should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

A research group co-led by Drs. Michael Hunt and Jean-Francois Esculier at the University of British Columbia is currently conducting a survey investigating how people perceive the appropriateness of running for maintaining knee joint health. This online survey should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

You may be able to participate if you:

  • Are aged 40 years and older (except for healthcare professionals)
  • Have access to the Internet to complete the survey
  • Speak English or French

Participation is anonymous and no information will identify you. Should you have any questions, feel free to contact Dr. Jean-Francois Esculier at jean-francois.esculier@ubc.ca.

The survey can be found here:
https://survey.ubc.ca/s/running-kneeOA/

Pre-RA Study: Open to patients with RA & their immediate family member

“Preventing Rheumatoid Arthritis (Pre-RA): perspectives of people with RA, people at risk and of rheumatologists” study
group picture of a multigenerational family

 

A research study funded by the Canadian Rheumatology Association’s Initiative for Outcomes in Rheumatology cAre (CIORA) wants to understand the perspectives of people with RA, those at risk of RA and health care providers about potential treatments aimed at preventing rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis Consumer Experts is a partner organization on the project.

Are you:

  • Aged over 18?
  • Someone with rheumatoid arthritis OR you have a first degree relative (parent, sibling, adult child) with rheumatoid arthritis?
    AND,
  • Someone with access to a computer and the internet?

Join the study as a patient with RA: https://surveys.core.ubc.ca/PreRA_RAs/login.html

Join the study as a first-degree relative: https://surveys.core.ubc.ca/PreRA_FDRs/login.html

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JointHealth™ insight – Summer 2017 – It’s summertime: What’s hot in arthritis research?

JointHealth™ insight – Summer 2017

It’s summertime: What’s hot in arthritis research?

Jointhealth™ insight screen captureIn this summer issue of JointHealth™ insight, we report on new information presented at the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Annual Congress, which took place in Madrid, Spain, in June 2017. EULAR updates covered include:

  • EULAR’s “Don’t Delay, Connect Today” campaign to improve models of care for inflammatory arthritis
  • Immunogenicity studies that show comparable results between biosimilars and originator biologics
  • Research from Denmark finds no higher patient use of health services after policy transition to biosimilars
  • A best practice spotlight on helping patients understand biosimilars

In this issue, you will also find:

  • Information about a new Osteoarthritis (OA) Tool for family physicians
  • A profile of a young scientist’s research journey looking at osteoarthritis and biomarkers

What’s hot in arthritis research?

Continue reading