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Let BC PharmaCare hear “Your Voice” on etanercept SEB

Stick man holding megaphoneBC PharmaCare is looking for your input on etanercept SEB for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

Etanercept SEB is a subsequent entry biologic version of etanercept (Enbrel). Etanercept SEB is used for treating people with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and works by targeting the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFA) molecule. It is given by subcutaneous injection.

A SEB needs to have the same mechanism of action as the originator biologic it was compared to, which means it should work in a similar way. Health Canada defines SEBs as a “biologic drug that enters the market subsequent to a version previously authorized in Canada, and with demonstrated similarity to a reference biologic drug.” Continue reading

Best Arthritis Workplaces: It’s Arthritis Awareness Month – the search is on!

Best Arthritis Workplaces BannerACE is searching for Canada’s Best Workplaces for Employees Living with Arthritis

To help kick off Arthritis Awareness Month in Canada, Arthritis Consumer Experts ACE) today announced the launch of the third annual Canada’s Best Workplaces for Employees Living with Arthritis. The judging criteria this year will particularly value those organizations providing an environment that meets the needs of employees living with arthritis to manage their disease and work with symptoms such as pain, fatigue, joint dysfunction or immobility.

“Smart employers know committed, productive teams require an environment where employees know they can balance work, family and personal responsibilities. In this third year of our award, we are looking closely at the availability of flexible work benefits and policies, as well as employees’ comments on their effectiveness,” said Cheryl Koehn, President and Founder, Arthritis Consumer Experts. “We want to recognize companies providing innovative flexible work arrangements to help employees with arthritis, and other chronic diseases, take better care of themselves, and in turn report less pain, fatigue, and disruption at work, allowing them to remain employed for longer.” Continue reading

Is your sport likely to result in arthritis?

Arthritis: A woman doing ribbon gymnasticsRio 2016 concluded Sunday with Canada winning 4 gold medals, 3 silver medals, and 15 bronze medals. Athletes in the Olympics are passionate about the sport they love and have devoted their life to training and excelling in their sport. We should be reminded that the display of skills and excellence, though as entertaining and thrilling as they are to spectators, could result in arthritis for the athletes down the road as injuries progresses and frequency of injuries increase. In light of this, Arthritis Olympic Village would love to thank all the athletes who participated in the Olympic games. Your selfless, determined, and passionate attitude towards the sport you love is an inspiration to us all. Continue reading

Wrist injury in table tennis can lead to wrist arthritis

Ping Pong racket and netInjury to wrist joints can lead to post traumatic wrist arthritis. According to the International Journal of Table Tennis Sciences, the most common areas of injury in table tennis players are the lower back, knee joint, wrist joint, shoulder joint, and ankle joint. These types of injuries can be avoided by keeping training sessions short and using the proper technique. Continue reading

Rosie MacLennan leads Team Canada into Rio2016 Opening Ceremony

King City resident Rosie MacLennan, trampoline gymnast and defending Olympic gold-medal winner, will be the flag bearer for Team Canada in the Rio 2016 Olympic opening ceremony.

The Canadian Olympic Official Team interviewed MacLennan about her role as a flag bearer and what it means to give your everything. When asked about the honour of being a flag bearer, she said: “The Olympic movement is something that has inspired me since I was really young and those values of respect, integrity, and excellence are things that really hit home so to be able to represent those values and be from a country that holds those values very highly is exciting.”

Respect, integrity, and excellence are values that should be applied to the patient-rheumatologist therapy conversation.

  • Respect can be observed in how rheumatologists talk to their patients. In what is coined as motivational interviewing in the healthcare industry, registered psychologist Michael Vallis of Dalhousie University recommends that rheumatologists should pose questions about medical adherence to patients in a non-judgemental and encouraging way. Patients should feel at ease about voicing their concerns about their treatment therapy.
  • Integrity plays an import role in disease outcome. It is crucial that a patient informs their doctor about arthritic symptoms that they may be experiencing. Once a doctor suspects a patient has arthritis, the patient should be referred to a rheumatologist in a timely manner. Early and aggressive treatment in arthritis can prevent further joint damage. Patients can also write letters to their government to ensure everyone has fair access to medications.
  • Excellence in the healthcare community is ambiguous; there is no single treatment therapy that works the same for everyone. Patients, friends, families, and healthcare professionals can work as a team to achieve “excellence” – keeping your arthritis under control and in remission, and helping you live a pain-free life.
Picture of Rosie MacLennan - Rio 2016 Olympic

Photo from: Springfree Trampoline/James Heaslip Photo (http://www.yorkregion.com/sports-story/6793106-5-facts-you-might-not-know-about-olympic-flagbearer-rosie-maclennan/)

“Give your everything means wanting it enough to do whatever it takes. So…on a day to day training, giving that extra little bit when your muscles are sore and pushing for that extra turn. It means that when others would give up, you’re still there.” – Rosie MacLennan

As we cheer on Team Canada, let’s remember to “give your everything” (minus the “giving that extra little bit when your muscles are sore and pushing for that extra turn”) and remind others that people living with arthritis can remain active and become “Olympians” in their own ways.

It’s time to hang out in the Arthritis Olympic Village!

Celebrate the 2016 Summer Olympics and Paralympics by joining us in the virtual Arthritis Olympic Village. 
Arthritis Olympic Village FB BannerArthritis Broadcast Network (powered by Arthritis Consumer Experts) invites you to join us between August 5-21 in our virtual “Arthritis Olympics Village” Facebook page. In honour of an Olympic event happening each day, the village will share inspirational stories on:

  • Athletes living with arthritis who have excelled or continue to excel at their sports
  • Injury prevention and risks associated with certain sports
  • Athletes and what they can do to advocate for the well-being of people living with arthritis
  • Which specific sports may benefit people living with arthritis

It’s time to recognize and promote that people living with arthritis can remain active and become “Olympians” in their own eyes.

Come hang out and experience the Arthritis Olympics Village: Continue reading