All posts related to "exercise"

The 1-minute survey to help launch the Physical Activity Support Kit Initiative website

Share your favourite “go to websites for physical activity information and guidance

A team of health and fitness professionals, researchers and patients partners from throughout BC have worked together to create a repository of online resources to guide and motivate people living with chronic health conditions to be physically active. To help them finalize their soon to be launched Physical Activity Support Kit Initiative (PASKI) website, they’re asking people with arthritis and other chronic conditions to take their 1-minute survey. Share your favourite “go to websites” for physical activity information and guidance. Survey closes February 8, 2019.

Please take the survey here: www.surveymonkey.com/r/8NRWCGR

Follow the conversation online:
Twitter: @PASKI_toolkit
Facebook: www.facebook.com/paski.toolkit.3

Keeping active with arthritis: a key to improved physical and mental health

Much has been said and written about the importance of exercise for our health and wellbeing. However, for people with arthritis, it also can help manage symptoms. While people with arthritis may be reluctant to exercise fearing joint damage, exercise is especially crucial for people living with all forms of arthritis disease. In fact, exercise is a vitally important part of a well-rounded arthritis treatment plan.

For people living with arthritis, pain, body weight, age and lack of knowledge about appropriate types of exercises may be hurdles to getting started on an exercise program. Another barrier is the lack of recommendation and referral for exercise by physicians. A Canadian study of osteoarthritis patients showed that only one third had been advised to exercise by their doctor. However, exercise has numerous physical and mental health benefits and there are no specific exercises that should be avoided by people with arthritis. 

One of the most important benefits of exercise is weight management, which helps to improve body image and can improve the symptoms of arthritis, especially of osteoarthritis. If a person is heavier than their ideal body weight, even a small amount of weight loss can help reduce both the risk of developing certain types of osteoarthritis and the chances of osteoarthritis worsening with age. 

For everyone, exercise helps to improve heart and lung function, but for people living with arthritis, a variety of types of exercise can help to reduce joint pain and control joint swelling. These include:

  • Range of motion exercises help to keep the joints mobile and are also useful for helping to prevent injuries.
  • Weight bearing exercises can decrease bone loss, keep weak joints stable, and reduce the risk of osteoporosis.
  • Aerobic exercises, such as walking, help with weight loss. As well, exercise can help make it easier to fall asleep and to sleep more soundly.

In addition to improved physical health, exercise has many psychological benefits. Pain can seem more pronounced when we are unhappy or upset and exercise can help reduce depression. Additionally, it can improve self-esteem and self-confidence, improve the ability to relax, improve mood and wellbeing, and promote a good body image. Exercise also provides a good outlet for dealing with stress and anxiety. 

Research suggests that most types of physical activity do not cause or worsen arthritis. In contrast, a lack of physical activity is associated with increased muscle weakness, joint stiffness, reduced range of motion, fatigue and overall reduced physical fitness. 

Once a regular pattern of exercise has been established, it is important to maintain this pattern.

In order to get the benefits of exercise, it is vital to stay active.

Research shows that in people with osteoarthritis, once exercise stops, the reduced pain and disability they were experiencing ends.

To ensure that you keep up with a routine of exercising, consider joining a group program or bringing a friend or family member along to motivate you.

Eight ways to get started exercising:

  1. Try to choose a type of exercise, or an exercise program, that you enjoy. It will be much easier to stick to the program if you like what you are doing. Most types of activities are helpful for people living with arthritis, so feel free to do your favourite things such as walking, swimming, golfing, or gardening. Exercise doesn’t have to be strenuous or boring to be good for you.
  2. Community centres can be a terrific resource. Flip through the lists of classes offered at your local community or aquatic centre to find activities that best suit your interests and physical abilities.
  3. You may find that having a partner to exercise with will be more motivating. Research tells us that people are more likely to stick with exercises if they bring along a friend or family member.
  4. Sometimes, having a detailed list of activities and realistic goals will help motivate you, so it may be useful to get a referral to a physical therapist to create an appropriate exercise regimen that suits you and your body. Also, keeping an exercise log can help you and your therapist monitor your progress.
  5. For some, assistive devices such as splints or orthotics may be helpful for protecting your joints while you exercise. An occupational therapist can be a good resource.
  6. Before beginning a new exercise program, it is a good idea to speak with your doctor or health care provider to determine the most appropriate exercise or activity for your needs and capabilities. Also, be aware that during flare-ups it is important not to over-stress and over-work joints, which may cause more pain. For this reason it is important to speak to your doctor about exercise and the types of exercises most suitable.
  7. Try setting a firm goal and then rewarding yourself when you achieve it. For example, set a goal of swimming 5 laps. When you reach that goal, reward yourself, and then set a new goal of swimming 10 laps. Rewards can be anything that is meaningful to you: setting aside time for yourself, treating yourself to a massage or a good book, or going out for a meal with friends.
  8. Acknowledge your effort. Be proud of yourself for taking an active role in your health care.

Yoga & Arthritis

The most recent EULAR recommendations for pain management in inflammatory arthritis and osteoarthritis (OA) include physical activity and exercise as a part of a patient’s treatment plan. Physical activity has been shown to significantly ease joint pain and increase mobility, for this reason, exercise is increasingly being prescribed by physicians and other healthcare providers.

Some examples of well-known and effective exercises for people with arthritis include walking, biking and swimming. These are low-impact aerobic exercises, meaning they will generally be easier on the joints and cause your heart rate to increase. Are there other activities that could also benefit people living with arthritis, such as yoga?

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A guide to living with osteoarthritis: Physiotherapy

Physiotherapy bannerPhysiotherapy as a part of your osteoarthritis treatment plan

Arthritis Consumer Experts (ACE) recently published a special edition of JointHealth™ insight for Arthritis Awareness Month in Canada. This issue featured a guide to living well with osteoarthritis and included information on the disease, diagnosis and self-care. We have created this supplemental article to highlight the importance of physiotherapy in osteoarthritis (OA) treatment.

The Canadian Physiotherapy Association describes the profession as “anchored in movement sciences and aims to enhance or restore function of multiple body systems. The profession is committed to health, lifestyle and quality of life. This holistic approach incorporates a broad range of physical and physiological therapeutic interventions and aids”.

Unlike inflammatory arthritis, there are currently no medications to treat the underlying disease process of OA. For this reason, non-medication therapies such as those provided by a physical therapist are important to help slow or stop the progression of OA and help maintain function.

How can a physiotherapist benefit you?
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A systematic review on the accuracy of Fitbit devices

Fitbit’s are wearable devices that individuals can use to track their daily physical activity and increase motivation to do physical activity. Fitbit devices offer real time data on various aspects of daily life including number of steps taken, energy expenditure, time spent asleep, and time spent in different levels of activity. Fitbit devices are becoming increasingly popular in the health-conscious consumer public; they are also being used more frequently in research as measurement tools and to inform healthcare decisions. But are they accurate?

A team of researchers at Arthritis Research Canada and the University of British Columbia, lead by Dr. Lynne Freehan, recently conducted a study to find out how accurate Fitbit devices are as measurement tools. Currently, several devices exist that have been identified as a “research standard” for activity tracking. In this review, researchers measured Fitbit’s accuracy by comparing the readings to that of the research-grade devices.

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National Relaxation Day: Tips to manage stress from arthritis

Arthritis affects people of all ages and can cause stress, and in more serious cases, depression and anxiety. Pain researchers are discovering how emotions, thoughts, and behaviours can influence the level of pain someone experiences and how well they adjust to it. For instance, how an individual responds to stress can predict how well they will recover from hip replacement surgery. Even how a patient feels about whether their coping strategies are working, or not, can affect their experience of the pain itself. Other factors that can influence how well you manage with your disease are whether you feel helpless, tend to spend a lot of time thinking about your pain, whether you decide to accept your pain and carry on in spite of it, and how well you handle stress. Arthritis Broadcast Network believes people living with arthritis deserve extra relaxation on National Relaxation Day and hope that the following tips will help you relax!

Breathing

Rhythmic breathing and deep breathing can help release tension from everyday life. The former involves inhaling and exhaling slowly while counting to five; the latter can be accomplished by filling your abdomen with air, like inflating and deflating a balloon.

Exercise 

Image of someone cycling on the shared bike pathwayHarvard Health summarizes the benefits of exercise as follows: Exercise reduces levels of the body’s stress hormones, such as adrenaline and cortisol. It also stimulates the production of endorphins, chemicals in the brain that are the body’s natural painkillers and mood elevators. Endorphins are responsible for the “runner’s high” and for the feelings of relaxation and optimism that accompany many hard workouts — or, at least, the hot shower after your exercise is over. Continue reading

Youth Sport Injury and Osteoarthritis

With summer upon us, millions of Canadian youth are participating in sport activities every day. Sport and recreation is a great way for youth to get exercise, socialize, develop teamwork skills and improve mental and physical health. Unfortunately, the benefits of sport also come with the risk of injury. In fact, one in three youth aged 11-18 years will sustain a sport-related injury that requires medical attention each year, with knee and ankle injuries being the most common. Research has shown that these youth sport injuries, if not treated properly, can lead to osteoarthritis (OA) within 15 years, specifically a form known as post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Youth sport injury can also lead to obesity later in life, which happens to be another major risk factor for OA. This means that youth with 1 major risk factor for OA (joint injury) are in danger of acquiring a second risk factor for the disease (obesity).

Osteoarthritis is caused by the breakdown of cartilage in the joints and affects more than 5 million Canadians nation-wide; the disease can cause moderate to severe pain, disability and even require surgery. Osteoarthritis symptoms generally appear 10-15 years after a joint injury, and by this time the disease is very difficult to treat. Unlike inflammatory arthritis, there are no medications to slow the disease process of osteoarthritis, so preventative measures are of even greater importance. The upside? We can ensure our youth take proper precautions to avoid injury and hugely minimize their risk of developing OA.

What can a coach or parent do to help?

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EULAR News – June 16, 2018

newspaper in mail slot

The benefits of exercise in inflammatory arthritis and osteoarthritis

ACE has frequently written about the benefits of exercise in inflammatory arthritis (IA) and osteoarthritis (OA). During a series of EULAR presentations, speakers provided evidence for regular physical activity for IA and OA patients.

Anne- Kathryn Rausch, an academic from Zurich University, spoke about how general recommendations for physical activity are effective, safe and feasible for patients with ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis.
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Exercise, arthritis and osteoporosis

Girl Stretching

Photo Credit: By marin/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The research literature on exercise is growing, and it is now generally accepted that there are many benefits of exercise for arthritis and osteoporosis. General benefits of exercise include improved heart and lung function, weight control, and improvement of self-esteem and self-confidence.

Before starting an exercise program, at home or at a gym, it is important to speak to a health professional trained in exercise for arthritis and osteoporosis. They can help you to design an exercise program that will be both safe and effective.

Before, during and after exercise:

  • It is important to warm-up and cool down before and after exercising. Use range of motion or heat.
  • If you are still experiencing pain more than two hours after exercise – you may have done too much.
  • Use slow, planned movements when doing ROM and strengthening exercises.
  • Practice in front of a mirror until you feel confident you are doing the exercise as demonstrated by your health professional.

Types of Exercise
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Younger patients getting knees and hips replaced. Is this an additional burden on the healthcare system?

New research shows that patients undergoing total joint replacement are younger now than they were in 2000. According to a review from the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database, the average patient undergoing a total hip replacement (THR) in 2014 was 64.9 years, while the average patient in 2000 was 66.3 years. In parallel, the average patient undergoing a total knee replacement (TKR) was 65.9 in 2014, and 68.0 in 2000.

Dr. Matthew Sloan, lead researcher and orthopaedic resident at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, tells Reuters Health by email: “These differences may not seem like much, but an average decrease of two years in a pool of 1 million people is a significant difference. It’s also a meaningful difference when you take into account the fact that these total joint replacements have a finite lifespan.”

Dr. Sloan further explains: “The technology for total hip and knee replacements continues to improve. However, at some point, the implant wears out. We believe modern implants without any unforeseen complications should last 20 years or more. The problem with an increasingly younger group of patients having these procedures, it becomes more likely that the implant will wear out during their lifetime. When this happens, a second surgery is required to revise the joint replacement. These procedures are not as successful as the initial surgeries, they are bigger operations, they take longer, and now the patient is 20 years older and not as strong as they were when they had the initial procedure.”

Because a second surgery is riskier and prone to complications like early failure or infection, the goal is to wait as long as possible so that a patient will undergo one surgery in their life. Other findings presented at the American Society of Orthopaedic Surgeon’s annual meeting include: Continue reading