All posts related to "lupus"

On World Lupus Day, learn how lupus and rheumatoid arthritis are similar

May 10 is World Lupus Day. Do you know that lupus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) share similar symptoms? Both can cause joint pain, swelling, and stiffness. The joints that are most commonly affected – the small joints in the fingers, knees, ankles, and toes – are the same. Both lupus and RA can cause morning stiffness lasting for at least an hour and symptoms usually appear symmetrical (i.e., both wrists are in pain).

picture of a purple butter to represent world lupus day

Below are symptoms that people with lupus experience and are rare in those with RA:

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Sleep myths that could be affecting your health

In a recent study published in Sleep Health, researchers from the New York University School of Medicine in New York City identified 20 common sleep myths and found little or no evidence in support of these beliefs. These myths could potentially be affecting your overall health.

These sleep myths underwent an internet and literature review and a Delphi process (a systematic protocol for collecting expert opinions) with 10 sleep experts from the field of sleep medicine and research. The goal of the study was to change the general mindset about sleep, especially the belief that getting by on less sleep is desirable. The research occurred in 3 phases:

  • Phase 1 – focus groups
  • Phase 2 – email-based feedback to edit, add, or remove myths
  • Phase 3 – sleep experts rated myths based on falseness and public health significance, using a 5-point scale (1 being “not at all” and 5 being “extremely false”)
Sleeping woman on bed

Below are some of the common myths mentioned in the study:

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Avis émis par Santé Canada à propos du Benlysta (belimumab) contre le lupus érythémateux disséminé

Des effets indésirables graves de dépression, d’idées et de comportements suicidaires ou d’automutilation ont été rapportés plus fréquemment chez des patients atteints de lupus érythémateux disséminé recevant Benlysta plutôt qu’un placebo dans le cadre d’une étude réalisée après la commercialisation.

Voici un extrait de l’avis de sécurité publié par Santé Canada :

Information à l’intention des consommateurs

BENLYSTA est utilisé en association avec d’autres médicaments pour traiter les adultes atteints de lupus (lupus érythémateux disséminé).

Un risque accru de signes ou de symptômes de maladie mentale comme la dépression, des idées ou des comportements suicidaires et des changements de l’humeur a été observé chez les patients qui reçoivent BENLYSTA.

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Health Canada warning about Benlysta (belimumab) for systemic lupus erythematosus

Serious adverse events of depression, suicidal ideation or behaviour, or self-injury were reported more frequently in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus receiving Benlysta than in patients receiving placebo during a post-marketing study 

Below is an excerpt from the safety alert published by Health Canada

Information for consumers

Benlysta is used in combination with other medicines to treat adults with lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus).

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Do you have Rheumatoid Arthritis or Lupus? Join the OPAM-IA study and get active!

Participate in a new study that will use wearable activity trackers, paired with a new web application, and physical activity counselling to help you get more active! 

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are types of inflammatory arthritis that causes inflammation and deformity of the joints, and affects your immune system. Physical activity can help to decrease pain and disability in joints affected by RA and SLE while benefiting your overall health.

If you are a person living with RA or SLE, and are interested in getting more active, we invite YOU to participate in the OPAM-IA study. Through participating in the OPAM-IA study, you will learn how to get active with RA or SLE. You will be asked to attend an education session, use a Fitbit Flex activity tracker with the new web application, and receive counselling from a registered physiotherapist. The total time commitment for the study is 6 months. There will be an in-person education session which takes place in the Greater Vancouver Area.

If you are interested, please fill out a 2-minute screening questionnaire. All responses will remain confidential, and you will be contacted by a research staff member within 48 hours to discuss your eligibility further.

Survey Link: http://open.arthritisresearch.ca/survey/index.php?r=survey/index/sid/455398/lang/en

For more information, contact Juliane Chien, study coordinator at 604-207-4032 or 1-844-707-4053 (toll free), or via email at opam.activity@arthritisresearch.ca.

Types of arthritis that make people more sensitive to sunlight

Lupus, psoriatic arthritis, and scleroderma are several types of arthritis that make people more sensitive to sunlight – either because of arthritis itself or the medications they take to treat it. It is important for these people to include sun protection as part of their self-management plan.

Stay sun safe image with beach essentialsThe sun radiates two types of “invisible” ultraviolet light that are harmful if you are exposed to it for a long period of time – ultraviolet A (UVA) can age the skin and ultraviolet B (UVB) can burn the skin. Both UVA and UVB can alter the DNA of skin cells, increasing the risk of skin cancer. For people living with lupus, psoriatic arthritis or scleroderma, sun exposure can make symptoms worse or increase damage to skin cells.

Sun sensitivity is a hallmark of lupus. People with lupus experience one or many of these symptoms:

  • “butterfly” rash over the bridge of the nose and the upper cheeks
  • scaly, purplish lesions on the face and neck
  • red, circular rashes on the chest, back and arms

Sun exposure can bring on these rashes or make existing rashes worse. Those with systemic lupus erythematosus find that exposure to the sun triggers a flare, including joint pain, fatigue, and fever.

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World Lupus Day: Spotlight on “Doctor Mom” living with lupus

Infographic on how lupus affects anybody

Image from Lupus UK

Lupus is the name given to a group of chronic immune diseases. It affects about 15,000 Canadians-approximately one in 2000.

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) occurs when the body’s immune system begins to malfunction and attack healthy tissue in various parts of the body, causing inflammation and damage. Tissues affected can include the skin, joints, muscles, kidneys, lungs, heart, blood vessels, and brain.

Like many other forms of arthritis, lupus occurs more commonly in women than in men-women develop lupus approximately ten times more often than men do. While it can strike at any age, it tends to occur most often between the ages of 15 and 45.

While the exact cause or causes of lupus remain unknown, there are a number of factors which researchers believe may trigger the disease, either alone or in combination with one another. These include genetics, hormones, certain types of antibiotics and other medications, prolonged and severe stress, viruses, and sun exposure.

Diagnosis of lupus
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Interviews from the 2018 #CRArthritis Facebook and Twitter Live event are now available on Facebook and YouTube!

Thanks to our fans and followers, Arthritis Broadcast Network’s 2018 #CRArthritis Facebook and Twitter Live event reached over 94,205 people to date! 

We did it! The Arthritis Broadcast Network (ABN) #CRArthritis Facebook and Twitter Live event at the Canadian Rheumatology Association (CRA) Annual Scientific Meeting and Arthritis Health Professions Association (AHPA) Annual Meeting conducted a total of 39 interviews (7 more than last year) in a little over 48 hours. Thank you to all of our interviewers, interviewees, and online audience who participated in the event. Because of you, the #CRArthritis event have informed and educated over 94,205 people to date. We’d say that’s an unqualified success, and you were a central part of making it happen – thank you!

CRArthritis

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Do you have Rheumatoid Arthritis or Lupus? Join the OPAM-IA study!

Participate in a new study that will use wearable activity trackers, paired with a new web application, and physical activity counselling to help you get more active!

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are types of inflammatory arthritis that causes inflammation and> deformity of the joints, and affects your immune system. Physical activity can help to decrease pain and disability in joints affected by RA and SLE while benefiting your overall health.

woman with rheumatoid arthritis looking at physical activity trackerIf you are a person living with RA or SLE, and are interested in getting more active, we invite YOU to participate in the OPAM-IA study. Through participating in the OPAM-IA study, you will learn how to get active with RA or SLE. You will be asked to attend an education session in Metro Vancouver, use a Fitbit Flex activity tracker with the new web application, and receive counselling from a registered physiotherapist. The total time commitment for the study is 6 months. Enrol now to start in January 2018!

If you are interested, please fill out a 2-minute screening questionnaire.All responses will remain confidential, and you will be contacted by a research staff member within 48 hours to discuss your eligibility further.

Survey Link: http://open.arthritisresearch.ca/survey/index.php?r=survey/index/sid/455398/lang/en.

For more information, contact Halima Elmi, study coordinator at 604-207-4053 or 1-844-707-4053 (toll free), or via email at opam.activity@arthritisresearch.ca.

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Study shows that when care quality goes down, lupus damage goes up

An image with different medical and health icons

Image courtesy of digital art at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

According to findings from a recent study, poor patient-provider communication and care coordination result in increased damage in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). If you would like to learn more about how to best communicate with your rheumatologist and physician, please visit JointHealth™ Education and take Lesson 1: The Art of communicating with your rheumatologist.

The research, titled “Relationship Between Process of Care and a Subsequent Increase in Damage in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus” was published in Arthritis Care & Research. The team wanted to understand how data from the Lupus Outcome Study could be used to evaluate healthcare interactions and subsequent accumulation of damage by the disease over two years.

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