All posts related to "mobile app"

Simon Fraser University’s Pain Studies Lab is looking for research participants for a paid study on a mobile health application

You can participate if you are a person living with or a caregiver of someone living with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. 

Research Objective
Pain Studies Lab at Simon Fraser University is seeking participants above 45 years old for a study on a mobile health application.

What do I have to do in the study?
The study will take about 2 hours to complete. You will be shown a mobile application meant to measure and track arthritis, and you will be asked questions about the usability of this application. There will also be an open-ended section to discuss your opinions about the application.

You will receive $40 as appreciation for your effort and time after completing the study.

How to participate?
To participate, you must be:

  • Above 45 years old;
  • The person or the caregiver of the person who has a diagnosis of osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis;
  • Using a smartphone in your daily life, such as using one or more Apps regularly;
  • Able to communicate in verbal and written English.

Interested? Have questions?
For more information or to book your appointment, please feel free to contact us:
Weina Jin
Telephone/text: 604-603-8530
Email: weinaj@sfu.ca

ACR News 3 – October 23, 2018

newspaper in mail slotACE is reporting from this week’s American College of Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals 2018 Annual Meeting. Here are some presentations that are important for arthritis patients.

The future of arthritis care and the next generation of arthritis specialists 

The Arthritis Alliance of Canada has looked carefully at how patients with arthritis receive timely diagnosis and treatment. Central to ensuring timely care is making sure there are adequate numbers of rheumatologists for making an early diagnosis and starting appropriate treatment. In 2015, the Canadian Rheumatology Association conducted a national workforce survey of rheumatologists across Canada. The survey found there is a current shortage of rheumatologists across the country that may worsen over the next 10 years because a third of the workforce reported plans to retire in the near future. This will occur at the same time as an expected increase in the number of arthritis patients within the next generation.
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