All posts related to "rheumatoid arthritis"

JointHealth™ insight –Arthritis science: What’s new in the research zoo? #CRArthritis

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In Arthritis Consumer Experts’ (ACE) latest issue of JointHealth™ insight, we explore what “building bridges” – the theme to this year’s Canadian Rheumatology Association and Arthritis Health Professions Association Annual Scientific Meeting – means to arthritis patients and health care providers. To help you, we have prepared a curated guide to a selection of #CRArthritis interviews, outlining key points covered during the event.

Among the topics of interest to patients, the interviews provide information on:

  • Building bridges between patients, healthcare providers, researchers, and allied health professionals
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Kids and arthritis
  • Working with arthritis
  • Targeted specific research
  • Medications
  • Mental health and arthritis
  • Hot topics from arthritis patient organizations
  • Models of arthritis care

All interviews can be accessed through YouTubeTwitter, and Facebook. To turn on French subtitles, please adjust the YouTube settings for each interview.

Simon Fraser University’s Pain Studies Lab is looking for research participants for a paid study on a mobile health application

You can participate if you are a person living with or a caregiver of someone living with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. 

Research Objective
Pain Studies Lab at Simon Fraser University is seeking participants above 45 years old for a study on a mobile health application.

What do I have to do in the study?
The study will take about 2 hours to complete. You will be shown a mobile application meant to measure and track arthritis, and you will be asked questions about the usability of this application. There will also be an open-ended section to discuss your opinions about the application.

You will receive $40 as appreciation for your effort and time after completing the study.

How to participate?
To participate, you must be:

  • Above 45 years old;
  • The person or the caregiver of the person who has a diagnosis of osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis;
  • Using a smartphone in your daily life, such as using one or more Apps regularly;
  • Able to communicate in verbal and written English.

Interested? Have questions?
For more information or to book your appointment, please feel free to contact us:
Weina Jin
Telephone/text: 604-603-8530
Email: weinaj@sfu.ca

The general election in Alberta is scheduled for April 16, 2019. Make your voice count.

What changes would you like to see in models of arthritis care?

Arthritis is a chronic disease that has a devastating and debilitating effect on the lives of more than 6 million Canadians. According to the Alberta Bone and Joint Health Institute, more than 500,000 Albertans are living with arthritis – approximately one in five. Within a generation, more than one in four Albertans is expected to have the most disabling and life-threatening types – osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. 

Arthritis is the leading cause of disability and work disability in Alberta, with nearly three out of every five people with arthritis of working age, costing Alberta’s economy $3.3 billion in direct and indirect costs. 

Considering the prevalence of the disease and its significant cost to individuals and society, arthritis should be an issue of great importance to candidates running for office. 

ACE sent an open letter and a survey to candidates running in the Alberta election. As part of its core government outreach activities and in the spirit of non-partisanship, ACE outlines the impact of arthritis in Alberta and asks each candidate to share how government can improve prevention, treatment and care in Alberta. 

The questionnaire asked the following questions:

  • What will your government do to bring a high quality, standardized evidence-based model of arthritis care for all Alberta residents?
  • What will your government do to introduce patient education and exercise programs, such as GLA:D, that have been proven to significantly reduce hip or knee osteoarthritis symptoms?
  • What will your government do to improve the uptake of biosimilars and increase accessibility to life saving medications and reduce out-of-pocket costs for Alberta residents living with inflammatory arthritis?
  • What will your government do to improve the healthcare and lives of Aboriginals living with arthritis in Alberta?
  • How will your government establish better prevention programs and facilitate flexible work arrangements to help reduce the direct and indirect costs of arthritis to Alberta employers and the Alberta economy?
  • Will your government take steps to increase the number of rheumatologists and trained arthritis professionals to ensure timely, specialized care for Alberta patients with arthritis?

ACE will be collecting Party and individual candidate’s responses. Responses will be posted on the Alberta Election 2019 page as we receive them. 

If you have comments, questions, or concerns about any of the answers provided, please take the time to contact the parties. 

Did their responses help you decide how you will vote? Tell us what you think of their answers. Please contact us by email.

High-intensity interval walk training associated with decreased disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis

A recent study has shown exciting new benefits associated with exercise for people living with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Researchers at Duke University in North Carolina found that 10 weeks of high-intensity interval walk training was associated with decreased disease activity and improved immune function for adults with RA. High-intensity interval walk training refers to a popular form of exercise that includes short bursts of fast-paced walking at maximum effort followed by less intense recovery periods.


The study included twelve physically inactive adults over the age of 55, with a confirmed diagnosis of RA. Participants completed a 10-week program consisting of 3x 30-minute sessions a week of supervised treadmill walking. This Included a 5-minute warm up and 5-minute cool down. Within the training session, participants walked at 80-90% of their maximum effort in intervals of 60 to 90 seconds. These high-intensity intervals were followed by recovery intervals at 50-60% maximum effort. Speed and interval times varied for each person based on a cardiorespitory fitness test, but none exceeded walking pace. 

Disease activity was assessed by a rheumatologist through a count of swollen and tender joints, perceived general health and blood tests to measure inflammation. Cardiovascular fitness and immune functions were assessed using a variety of clinical and laboratory tests, as well as standardized questionnaires. At the end of the 10 weeks, the following outcomes were observed:

  • RA disease activity reduced by 38%, with a significant decrease in swollen joints, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and improved self-perceived health. An ESR blood test measures the rate at which red blood cells settle in the period of one hour, revealing inflammatory activity in the body. 
  • Improved immune functions suggesting a reduced infection risk and inflammatory potential 
  • Cardiorespitory fitness increased by 9%
  • Resting blood pressure and heart rate both reduced 

 There is a substantial amount of research on exercise and rheumatoid arthritis, but few studies have reported the actual lowering of disease activity scores. As stated by the researchers, this study suggests that,

“High intensity interval walking could be an efficient, tolerable, and highly effective intervention to augment disease activity and improve overall health in patients with RA.”

There are certain limitations to the study such as the small sample size and no control group, but the findings will hopefully encourage more research in the area. In addition, these findings add to a growing body of research on the benefits of exercise for people with arthritis. To learn more about the study, click here.


To learn more about physical activity and arthritis visit the following pages:

JointHealth™ insight – February 2019

Mental Health and arthritis: a complex relationship

In the latest issue of JointHealth™ insight, Arthritis Consumer Experts (ACE) reports on the important relationship between mental health and arthritis. People with inflammatory arthritis are more likely to experience mental health conditions such as depression, anxiety, and “brain fog” than the general population.

This issue of JointHealth™ insight will cover the following:

  • Relationships between depression, “brain fog” and inflammatory arthritis
  • Burden of depression
  • Recognizing and managing depression and anxiety
  • Prevent depression and anxiety
  • Love, sex, and arthritis*

*Please be advised that the content in this section contain graphics of “joint friendly” positions during sex and may not be appropriate for you or others in your household. The graphics are excerpted from the book, “Rheumatoid Arthritis: Plan to Win”, by Cheryl Koehn, Dr. John Esdaile and Taysha Palmer published by Oxford University Press, 2002.

Continue reading

Call for patient input on baricitinib (Olumiant®) for moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis 

stick man with megaphone for patient inputDo you have moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis? We need your valuable input.

The Common Drug Review (CDR) is currently welcoming patients and their caregivers to provide input to patient organizations on the manufacturer’s submission for baricitinib (Olumiant®) for moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis.

The CDR is part of the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). The CDR conducts objective, rigorous reviews of the clinical and cost effectiveness of drugs, and provides formulary listing recommendations to the publicly funded drug plans in Canada (except Quebec).

To help them make their recommendations, the CDR accepts input from patient organizations and groups, like Arthritis Consumer Experts (ACE). Because patient input is vitally important to government decision-making about medications, we would like to gather your views and share them with the CDR.

If you live with rheumatoid arthritis or care for someone with rheumatoid arthritis, please send us your input by Wednesday, January 16, 2019, so that we may make a submission by the January 18th deadline. Your input will be anonymous.

Please submit your input by completing the questionnaire below or contact us at feedback@jointhealth.org to provide your input or arrange for a phone interview at 604-974-1366.

>>> Take the questionnaire.

These are the questions they are asking: Continue reading

Join Canadian Olympic snowboarder Spencer O’Brien and Dr. Diane Lacaille at the “Women in Biz Network: RA Matters at Work Event” on November 26

Picture of women at work

 

RSVP by November 23! Register for this free event to hear and learn from inspirational women living with arthritis and leading health professionals! 

Event date: November 26, 2018
Location:
The Westin Bayshore (Salon Ballroom D&E)
1601 Bayshore Drive,
Vancouver V6G 2V4
Free Registration: ramattersatwork.eventbrite.com
Please RSVP by November 23, 2018.

300,000 Canadians live with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and women are affected two to three times more often than men. For many people living with RA, career continuation and advancement can seem out of reach.

To help illuminate the accessibility of career progression for people with chronic diseases like RA, Women in Biz Network and Eli Lily Canada are launching a nationwide series of empowering events called RA Matters at Work.

Join them in an evening of lively discussion among a community of inspirational women living with arthritis. Speakers will share stories of difficulty and triumph while thriving in the workplace, and challenge the negative beliefs and self-doubt associated with living and working with a chronic disease.

Come learn from experts in rheumatology about advances in preventing work disability for people with inflammatory arthritis. The event will be moderated by ACE founder and president, Cheryl Koehn. Panelists include:

  • Dr. Diane Lacaille – Associate Scientific Director and Senior Research Scientist of Rheumatology, Arthritis Research Canada
  • Ms. Spencer O’Brien – Canadian Olympic Snowboarder, 2016 X Games Gold Medalist, 2 x World Champion, Olympian, person living with RA
  • Ms. Maya Joshi – Program coordinator, Arthritis Consumer Experts
  • Ms. Flora To-Miles – Managing Editor of Occupational Therapy Now, The Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists
  • Ms. Alison Stewart – Registered Rehabilitation Professional, Arthritis Research Canada Making It Work Research-Practice Program
  • Ms. Julia Chayko – Actor and Writer

Join us and the conversation at #RAMATTERSATWORK

Women in Biz Network: RA Matters at Work Event on November 26 in Vancouver, BC

Picture of women at work

 

Register for this free event to hear and learn from inspirational women living with arthritis and leading health professionals!

Event date: November 26, 2018, from 5:45 PM to 8:30 PM
Location:
The Westin Bayshore (Salon Ballroom D&E)
1601 Bayshore Drive,
Vancouver V6G 2V4
Free Registration: ramattersatwork.eventbrite.com

300,000 Canadians live with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and women are affected two to three times more often than men. For many people living with RA, career continuation and advancement can seem out of reach.

To help illuminate the accessibility of career progression for people with chronic diseases like RA, Women in Biz Network and Eli Lily Canada are launching a nationwide series of empowering events called RA Matters at Work.
Continue reading

Yoga & Arthritis

The most recent EULAR recommendations for pain management in inflammatory arthritis and osteoarthritis (OA) include physical activity and exercise as a part of a patient’s treatment plan. Physical activity has been shown to significantly ease joint pain and increase mobility, for this reason, exercise is increasingly being prescribed by physicians and other healthcare providers.

Some examples of well-known and effective exercises for people with arthritis include walking, biking and swimming. These are low-impact aerobic exercises, meaning they will generally be easier on the joints and cause your heart rate to increase. Are there other activities that could also benefit people living with arthritis, such as yoga?

Continue reading

Osteoarthritis, insomnia, and depression

Close up head shot of a woman sleepingOn World Suicide Prevention Day, learn more about the connection between osteoarthritis, insomnia, and depression. According to a recent study published in Arthritis Care & Research, pain, insomnia and depression were the main reasons for people living with osteoarthritis (OA) to schedule a visit with their doctor.

The study consisted of 2,976 people and half the participants had at least one of three symptoms: pain, insomnia, and depression. An estimated 34 percent of the patients studied experienced insomnia and 29 percent had depression, in addition to moderate to severe pain.

Dr. Minhui Liu is the lead author of the study and a research fellow at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in Baltimore. His team found that among patients with osteoarthritis, about 47 percent of them reported moderate to severe pain, 17 percent clinical insomnia, and 21 percent clinical depression. In addition, about 13 percent of participants experienced moderate to severe pain and clinical insomnia at the same time, and 13 percent experienced moderate to severe pain and clinical depression at the same time.  Continue reading