Groundbreaking research. Life-changing discoveries.

Sleep myths that could be affecting your health

In a recent study published in Sleep Health, researchers from the New York University School of Medicine in New York City identified 20 common sleep myths and found little or no evidence in support of these beliefs. These myths could potentially be affecting your overall health.

These sleep myths underwent an internet and literature review and a Delphi process (a systematic protocol for collecting expert opinions) with 10 sleep experts from the field of sleep medicine and research. The goal of the study was to change the general mindset about sleep, especially the belief that getting by on less sleep is desirable. The research occurred in 3 phases:

  • Phase 1 – focus groups
  • Phase 2 – email-based feedback to edit, add, or remove myths
  • Phase 3 – sleep experts rated myths based on falseness and public health significance, using a 5-point scale (1 being “not at all” and 5 being “extremely false”)
Sleeping woman on bed

Below are some of the common myths mentioned in the study:

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Simon Fraser University’s Pain Studies Lab is looking for research participants for a paid study on a mobile health application

You can participate if you are a person living with or a caregiver of someone living with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. 

Research Objective
Pain Studies Lab at Simon Fraser University is seeking participants above 45 years old for a study on a mobile health application.

What do I have to do in the study?
The study will take about 2 hours to complete. You will be shown a mobile application meant to measure and track arthritis, and you will be asked questions about the usability of this application. There will also be an open-ended section to discuss your opinions about the application.

You will receive $40 as appreciation for your effort and time after completing the study.

How to participate?
To participate, you must be:

  • Above 45 years old;
  • The person or the caregiver of the person who has a diagnosis of osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis;
  • Using a smartphone in your daily life, such as using one or more Apps regularly;
  • Able to communicate in verbal and written English.

Interested? Have questions?
For more information or to book your appointment, please feel free to contact us:
Weina Jin
Telephone/text: 604-603-8530
Email: weinaj@sfu.ca

The 1-minute survey to help launch the Physical Activity Support Kit Initiative website

Share your favourite “go to websites for physical activity information and guidance

A team of health and fitness professionals, researchers and patients partners from throughout BC have worked together to create a repository of online resources to guide and motivate people living with chronic health conditions to be physically active. To help them finalize their soon to be launched Physical Activity Support Kit Initiative (PASKI) website, they’re asking people with arthritis and other chronic conditions to take their 1-minute survey. Share your favourite “go to websites” for physical activity information and guidance. Survey closes February 8, 2019.

Please take the survey here: www.surveymonkey.com/r/8NRWCGR

Follow the conversation online:
Twitter: @PASKI_toolkit
Facebook: www.facebook.com/paski.toolkit.3

November 14: Osteoarthritis Action Alliance Lunch and Learn Webinar

EQUIP-ing OA Patients and Health Care Providers Through Patient Engagement in Research with Marie Westby and Cheryl Koehn

The OA Action Alliance Lunch & Learn webinars keep you up-to-date on the latest osteoarthritis research, news and activities. This particular webinar will feature Marie Westby and Cheryl Koehn and will take place on November 14, 2018 at 12:00 pm ET. Webinars are free and open to the public. Webinars are archived on the events page on the OA Action Alliance’s website and on their YouTube channel in case you missed one or can’t get enough!

Please click here to register for the webinar. Osteoarthritis Action Alliance webinar

Marie Westby, PT, PhD is the Physical Therapy Teaching Supervisor in the Mary Pack Arthritis Program in Vancouver, BC and holds a Clinician Scientist position in the Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, Vancouver.
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Arthritis Research Canada is exploring the health benefits of everyday activities and needs your participation!

Researchers are recruiting individuals with and without inflammatory arthritis for a study that will explore the health benefits of everyday activities. While the main goal of this study is to explore the relationship between everyday activities and health outcomes of those with inflammatory arthritis, we are also asking people without arthritis to participate in order to determine how the relationship between everyday activities and health differs between groups. The research is conducted by a PhD trainee who is affiliated with Arthritis Research Canada and the University of British Columbia.
Clock image with daily activities icon
You are eligible if you:

  • Have inflammatory arthritis (with no other major health conditions) OR do not have inflammatory arthritis and are generally healthy
  • Are 19 years of age or older
  • Do not currently smoke

What’s involved?
Participants will attend a two-hour group session in British Columbia to fill out health and activity questionnaires, and provide blood samples using a pinprick blood test (five blood spots). Participants will receive a monetary honorarium in appreciation for their time, as well as reimbursement for any parking or transit expenses.

Why do this research?
Other than physical activity, there is little evidence regarding the types of activities or occupations that support living well with inflammatory arthritis. We aim to study the health benefits of people’s everyday activities, with an emphasis on social and creative characteristics of activities, among adults with and without inflammatory arthritis.

Interested? Have questions?
Contact Flora To-Miles
604.364.6223
fto-miles@arthritisresearch.ca

A systematic review on the accuracy of Fitbit devices

Fitbit’s are wearable devices that individuals can use to track their daily physical activity and increase motivation to do physical activity. Fitbit devices offer real time data on various aspects of daily life including number of steps taken, energy expenditure, time spent asleep, and time spent in different levels of activity. Fitbit devices are becoming increasingly popular in the health-conscious consumer public; they are also being used more frequently in research as measurement tools and to inform healthcare decisions. But are they accurate?

A team of researchers at Arthritis Research Canada and the University of British Columbia, lead by Dr. Lynne Freehan, recently conducted a study to find out how accurate Fitbit devices are as measurement tools. Currently, several devices exist that have been identified as a “research standard” for activity tracking. In this review, researchers measured Fitbit’s accuracy by comparing the readings to that of the research-grade devices.

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Knee pain? Join the SuPRA study and get active!

Participate in a new study that will use wearable activity trackers, paired with a new web application, and physical activity counselling to help you get more active!

image of a woman holding a Fitbit Flex regarding osetoarthritis studyKnee osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of chronic pain and disability. Physical activity can help to decrease pain and disability in joints affected by OA while benefiting your overall health.

If you are a person living with knee pain or knee OA, and interested in getting more active, we invite YOU to participate in the SuPRA study. Through participating in SuPRA you will learn how to get active with knee OA. You will be asked to attend an education session, use a Fitbit Flex activity tracker with the new web application, and receive counselling from a registered physiotherapist. The total time commitment for the study is 9 months. There will be an in-person education session which takes place in the Greater Vancouver Area.

If you are interested, please fill out a 3-minute screening questionnaire. All responses will remain confidential, and you will be contacted by a research staff member within 48 hours to discuss your eligibility further.

Survey Link:
http://open.arthritisresearch.ca/survey/index.php?r=survey/index/sid/143586/lang/en

For more information, contact Johnathan Tam, Research Coordinator at 604-207-4027 or 1-844-707-4053, or via email at supra.activity@arthritisresearch.ca.

Do you have Rheumatoid Arthritis or Lupus? Join the OPAM-IA study and get active!

Participate in a new study that will use wearable activity trackers, paired with a new web application, and physical activity counselling to help you get more active! 

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are types of inflammatory arthritis that causes inflammation and deformity of the joints, and affects your immune system. Physical activity can help to decrease pain and disability in joints affected by RA and SLE while benefiting your overall health.

If you are a person living with RA or SLE, and are interested in getting more active, we invite YOU to participate in the OPAM-IA study. Through participating in the OPAM-IA study, you will learn how to get active with RA or SLE. You will be asked to attend an education session, use a Fitbit Flex activity tracker with the new web application, and receive counselling from a registered physiotherapist. The total time commitment for the study is 6 months. There will be an in-person education session which takes place in the Greater Vancouver Area.

If you are interested, please fill out a 2-minute screening questionnaire. All responses will remain confidential, and you will be contacted by a research staff member within 48 hours to discuss your eligibility further.

Survey Link: http://open.arthritisresearch.ca/survey/index.php?r=survey/index/sid/455398/lang/en

For more information, contact Juliane Chien, study coordinator at 604-207-4032 or 1-844-707-4053 (toll free), or via email at opam.activity@arthritisresearch.ca.

Participants needed for research in quality of care for hip and knee replacement rehabilitation

Have you had a hip or knee replacement in the last 4 months? Are you interested in being able to give feedback on the quality of rehabilitation care you received?

Picture of health care professional assessing hip and kneeYou are invited to take part in a study to pilot test a new questionnaire on the quality of rehabilitation care after joint replacement surgery.

Your feedback will help us to develop a patient-friendly questionnaire that will be included in an online toolkit of print and web-based resources that help people having joint replacement surgery participate in their own care and track the quality of rehab received.

You can participate if you:

  • Had a primary (first time) total hip or knee replacement surgery for osteoarthritis (OA) in the past 4 months
  • Have almost finished or just finished your supervised rehabilitation
  • Are 19 years of age or older
  • Speak and read English
  • Are comfortable using a computer

What does participation involve?

  • Complete a series of short online questionnaires and “think aloud” so a researcher can note any questions or issues you experience
  • Share your views about the online questionnaires during a short (45-minute) small group discussion immediately afterwards. Group discussions are currently planned for:
    • Thursday, August 23rd 10-11: 30 am and 1-2: 30 pm
    • Thursday, August 30th 10-11: 30 am

For more information about this Study please contact:
Paul Drexler

Centre for Hip Health and Mobility
2635 Laurel Street, Vancouver
Phone: 604-675-2578 or
E-mail: equip@hiphealth.ca

Honorarium, refreshments & parking provided!

Dr. Cheryl Barnabe – Champion of arthritis care and research in Indigenous communities

Arthritis Broadcast Network had the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Cheryl Barnabe at a #CRArthritis event, a champion of arthritis care and research in Indigenous communities. In this interview, Dr. Cheryl Barnabe, Assistant Professor at the Division of Rheumatology at the University of Calgary, shares with us information from her workshop “Investigating access to arthritis health services for Aboriginal people: A Framework for System Reform”.

Rheumatoid arthritis affects about 1% of the Canadian population or 1 out of every 100 people. This increases to 5% for aboriginal Canadians. This population not only is at greater risk for getting RA but the disease is more severe than with other populations. For aboriginal people rheumatoid arthritis is one of the five top five chronic diseases reported. More Canadian women get RA then men (3:1), however, this figure almost doubles for aboriginal women.

A study conducted by the National Aboriginal Health Organization (NAHO) 2002, by First Nations people for First Nations people, had approximately 22,000 participants making up 238 communities, both on-reserve and off-reserve First Nations people across Canada.

The following highlights some of the results of the study:

  • arthritis is one of the five top conditions to affect the First Nations population
  • more than half (52%) of First Nations adults with disabilities reported having arthritis compared to 14.6% without disabilities
  • 25.3% of First Nations adults have arthritis compared to 19.1% of the general Canadian population
  • there is a higher rate of arthritis among First Nations women compared to other women in Canada, except for women over 60 years of age. The following chart shows the range of difference between these two groups with more than double the First Nations women with arthritis compared to other Canadian women up to age 39 years.

Dr. Barnabe is also a past recipient of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research’s (CIHR) Foundation Grant. Below is the description of the award on the CIHR website:

Developing a more complete picture of arthritis in Indigenous communities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Most people aren’t aware that women and Indigenous people are at a much higher risk for arthritis, and that kids can get arthritis too.” — Dr. Cheryl Barnabe

CIHR Foundation Grant Recipient

Dr. Cheryl Barnabe
Cumming School of Medicine
University of Calgary

Dr. Barnabe’s Research

Dr. Cheryl Barnabe, a Métis clinician and researcher at the University of Calgary, is exploring why arthritis appears to disproportionately affect Indigenous communities, and what can be done to reduce these disparities. Continue reading