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Bonnes nouvelles pour le Québec !

Le tofacitinib (Xeljanz®) est approuvé au Québec dans le traitement de la polyarthrite rhumatoïde.

Approved stampDepuis le 1er juin dernier, le tofacitinib (Xeljanz®) a été ajouté à la liste des médicaments remboursés par le régime public d’assurance-médicaments du Québec dans le traitement de la polyarthrite rhumatoïde, de modérée à sévère. Cliquez ici pour les critères détaillés du remboursement du médicament.

Le tofacitinib est un médicament à petite molécule cible administré par voie orale pour lequel Santé Canada a émis un Avis de conformité le 17 avril 2014. Le tofacitinib est indiqué en association avec la méthotrexate pour réduire les signes et symptômes de la polyarthrite rhumatoïde active, de modérée à sévère, chez les patients adultes ayant répondu de façon inadéquate à la méthotrexate. Pour les cas d’intolérance à la méthotrexate, le médecin peut envisager l’utilisation du tofacitinib en monothérapie.

Cliquez ici pour accéder à la version la plus à jour de la fiche-rapport du comité ACE sur le remboursement des modificateurs de la réponse biologique par les régimes publics d’assurance-médicaments.

Good news in Quebec!

Good news in Quebec!

Tofacitinib (Xeljanz®) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis approved in Quebec.

Approved stampAs of June 1st, tofacitinib (Xeljanz®) for the treatment of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis has been listed for coverage on Quebec’s drug formulary. Click here to view the detailed medication criteria.

Tofacitinib is an oral targeted small molecule medicine (TSMM) that was issued a Notice of Compliance (NOC) from Health Canada on April 17, 2014. Tofacitinib in combination with methotrexate (MTX), is indicated for reducing the signs and symptoms of RA, in adult patients with moderately to severely active RA who have had an inadequate response to MTX. In cases of intolerance to MTX, physicians may consider the use of tofacitinib as monotherapy.

Click here to view the most up-to-date version of ACE’s Report Card on provincial formulary reimbursement listings for biologic response modifiers.

Topical treatments for musculoskeletal pain

Lotion container with words on the sideAccording to a recent review published in the Cochrane Library, topical treatments (gels, creams, sprays) are effective in providing pain relief for acute musculoskeletal pain in adults. The review was conducted by a team of Cochrane authors based in the United Kingdom and the Cochrane Pain, Palliative, and Supportive Care Review Group and based on a review that was initially published in 2010. Continue reading

Risk factors of osteoporosis

Picture of Milk and BreadOsteoporosis is a disease characterized by low bone mass and deterioration of bone quality. This results in bones becoming thin and weak, which increases the risk of fracture as they are easy to break. It is known as the “silent thief” because bone loss occurs without any symptoms. In fact, often it is not until someone fractures a wrist, spine, rib, or hip that osteoporosis is suspected (and often it is missed even after a fragility fracture).

As many as two million Canadians have osteoporosis. One in four women, including a third of women aged 60-70 years and two thirds of women aged 80 years and older, will be diagnosed with osteoporosis.

Research shows that weight-bearing exercise, including soccer, is an effective way to reduce the amount of bone loss over time and preserve bone mass, and thus, reduce your likelihood of developing osteoporosis and having a fracture. To prepare for the FIF Women’s World Cup™ this weekend and Father’s Day, #TeamArthritis challenges you to do something that reduce your chance of getting osteoporosis.

Continue reading

FIFA 11+ : Preventing osteoarthritis by preventing injuries in youth

FIFA 11+ Team

Photo from: http://f-marc.com/11plus/home/

FIFA 11+ : Preventing osteoarthritis by preventing injuries in youth

The FIFA Women’s World Cup™ is here in Canada and causing excitement across the country. Our youth will see the best female soccer players in the world take their places on the field to play the “beautiful” game. Soccer in Canada has one of the largest participation rates in youth. However, there is a downside – injury – especially of the knee and ankle. Knee and ankle injury rate in soccer are significant for both boys and girls, with girls up to 8 times more likely to have an injury. Injuries cause pain and disability and can lead to long-term consequences – osteoarthritis (OA). Sports injuries are one of the leading causes of developing osteoarthritis later in life which results in daily pain and suffering for millions of people across Canada. Many people with OA can remember the injury that started their knee or ankle problems. Continue reading

Team USA’s Shannon Boxx: Life & Soccer with Lupus

Shannon with Lupus banner

Picture credit: Fame! Soccer Girl https://famegirlsworldcupblog.wordpress.com/page/2/

As we celebrate the FIFA Women’s World Cup™, Team Arthritis wants to pay tribute to team USA’s midfielder Shannon Boxx, who, living with lupus, is all too familiar with life with arthritis. This year’s World Cup™ marks Boxx’s fourth Women’s World Cup™.

Fun Fact: Midfielders run a distance of 120-yard across the field to play offense and sprints back to play defense, running about 7 miles in a 90-minute game and engaging in close combat to gain possession of the ball. Continue reading