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Arthritis Broadcast Network ranked #5 on Feedspot’s Top 20 Arthritis YouTube channels to Follow

Arthritis Broadcast Network ranked #5 on Feedspot’s Top 20 Arthritis YouTube channels to Follow

Thanks to our growing audience, Arthritis Broadcast Network (ABN) – powered by Arthritis Consumer Experts – has the most videos and views on a Canadian channel!

Feedspot Top 20 Arthritis YouTube Channel to follow badge

Arthritis Broadcast Network has been ranked #5 on the top 20 arthritis YouTube channels to follow by Feedspot. Rankings are based on the following criteria:

  • Total YouTube channel subscribers, video views, and video uploads
  • Quality and consistency of videos
  • YouTube search ranking
  • Feedspot editorial team’s objective and subjective review

On Feedspot’s list, ABN has the most videos and views on a Canadian channel – a total of 200 videos and 242,489 views!

Arthritis Broadcast Network’s channel provides information about the different types of arthritis, pain management, self-care, exercise, nutrition, models of care, patient engagement, research, and many other topics valuable to the arthritis community. Please show your support and help others living with arthritis by doing the following:

JointHealth™ insight – Summer 2018

English JointHealth insight front cover pageSmart Design for People Living with Arthritis

In this issue of JointHealth™ insight, we look at how smart choices in our living environments can make your arthritis experience easier, safer, and less painful, providing you solutions on how to modify your home or work environment.

In this issue, you will learn about:

  • Smart design solutions for home: Around the house, bedroom, dressing, kitchen, bathroom, laundry room, dining room, living room, and foyer
  • Smart design solutions for work: Desk and work schedule
  • The importance of educating co-workers and employers about arthritis

Continue reading

Knee pain? Join the SuPRA study and get active!

Participate in a new study that will use wearable activity trackers, paired with a new web application, and physical activity counselling to help you get more active!

image of a woman holding a Fitbit Flex regarding osetoarthritis studyKnee osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of chronic pain and disability. Physical activity can help to decrease pain and disability in joints affected by OA while benefiting your overall health.

If you are a person living with knee pain or knee OA, and interested in getting more active, we invite YOU to participate in the SuPRA study. Through participating in SuPRA you will learn how to get active with knee OA. You will be asked to attend an education session, use a Fitbit Flex activity tracker with the new web application, and receive counselling from a registered physiotherapist. The total time commitment for the study is 9 months. There will be an in-person education session which takes place in the Greater Vancouver Area.

If you are interested, please fill out a 3-minute screening questionnaire. All responses will remain confidential, and you will be contacted by a research staff member within 48 hours to discuss your eligibility further.

Survey Link:
http://open.arthritisresearch.ca/survey/index.php?r=survey/index/sid/143586/lang/en

For more information, contact Johnathan Tam, Research Coordinator at 604-207-4027 or 1-844-707-4053, or via email at supra.activity@arthritisresearch.ca.

Do you have Rheumatoid Arthritis or Lupus? Join the OPAM-IA study and get active!

Participate in a new study that will use wearable activity trackers, paired with a new web application, and physical activity counselling to help you get more active! 

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are types of inflammatory arthritis that causes inflammation and deformity of the joints, and affects your immune system. Physical activity can help to decrease pain and disability in joints affected by RA and SLE while benefiting your overall health.

If you are a person living with RA or SLE, and are interested in getting more active, we invite YOU to participate in the OPAM-IA study. Through participating in the OPAM-IA study, you will learn how to get active with RA or SLE. You will be asked to attend an education session, use a Fitbit Flex activity tracker with the new web application, and receive counselling from a registered physiotherapist. The total time commitment for the study is 6 months. There will be an in-person education session which takes place in the Greater Vancouver Area.

If you are interested, please fill out a 2-minute screening questionnaire. All responses will remain confidential, and you will be contacted by a research staff member within 48 hours to discuss your eligibility further.

Survey Link: http://open.arthritisresearch.ca/survey/index.php?r=survey/index/sid/455398/lang/en

For more information, contact Juliane Chien, study coordinator at 604-207-4032 or 1-844-707-4053 (toll free), or via email at opam.activity@arthritisresearch.ca.

Participants needed for research in quality of care for hip and knee replacement rehabilitation

Have you had a hip or knee replacement in the last 4 months? Are you interested in being able to give feedback on the quality of rehabilitation care you received?

Picture of health care professional assessing hip and kneeYou are invited to take part in a study to pilot test a new questionnaire on the quality of rehabilitation care after joint replacement surgery.

Your feedback will help us to develop a patient-friendly questionnaire that will be included in an online toolkit of print and web-based resources that help people having joint replacement surgery participate in their own care and track the quality of rehab received.

You can participate if you:

  • Had a primary (first time) total hip or knee replacement surgery for osteoarthritis (OA) in the past 4 months
  • Have almost finished or just finished your supervised rehabilitation
  • Are 19 years of age or older
  • Speak and read English
  • Are comfortable using a computer

What does participation involve?

  • Complete a series of short online questionnaires and “think aloud” so a researcher can note any questions or issues you experience
  • Share your views about the online questionnaires during a short (45-minute) small group discussion immediately afterwards. Group discussions are currently planned for:
    • Thursday, August 23rd 10-11: 30 am and 1-2: 30 pm
    • Thursday, August 30th 10-11: 30 am

For more information about this Study please contact:
Paul Drexler

Centre for Hip Health and Mobility
2635 Laurel Street, Vancouver
Phone: 604-675-2578 or
E-mail: equip@hiphealth.ca

Honorarium, refreshments & parking provided!

Survey: Help inform the FLARE-OA international project team

University of Lorraine logoThe aim of this survey is to create a tool for the detection of a flare in osteoarthritis of lower limbs that occurred in the past 4 weeks. 

Dear Sir/Madame,

The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) are inviting you to participate in a Delphi survey of the “FLARE-OA” research project entitled “Development and validation of a tool for the detection of flare in osteoarthritis of the lower limbs”.

The “FLARE-OA” project is led by researchers at the University of Lorraine in France and aims to define flare in osteoarthritis (OA). The research team needs to know what patients think is important to consider to define OA flare. The aim of this survey is to create a tool for the detection of a flare in osteoarthritis of lower limbs that occurred on the past 4 weeks.

There is no right or wrong answer in this Delphi survey. Your responses should be based on your own experience and knowledge on the subject.

If you wish to participate in this survey, please:

  1. Register through a unique link, providing your first and last name, and email address: http://enquetes.univ-lorraine.fr/index.php/13432?newtest=Y
  2. Once you register, a link to the questionnaire/survey will be sent to your email account asking you to complete the FLARE-OA FIRST ROUND survey

The survey will take approximately 10 minutes to complete and should not exceed 15 minutes when connected to our site. You have the possibility to answer the survey sequentially (save and reload your ongoing answer). Please provide a response within 3 weeks.

Your participation is very important to the international research team! We thank you in advance for your kind cooperation.

Sincerely,

The FLARE-OA international project team

Francis Guillemin (co-PI), David Hunter (co-PI), Gillian Hawker, Lyn March, Bruno Fautrel, Claudia Rutherford, Elisabeth Spitz, Camille Ricatte, Amandine Schoumacker, Laetitia Ricci-Boyer, Marita Cross, Annica Barcenilla-Wong, Joanna Makovey, Hema Umapathy, Hakima Manseur

Surrey Inflammatory Arthritis Clinic: innovative, convenient, informative

Ask for your rheumatologist’s referral to make an appointment at the clinic! 

The recently opened Surrey Inflammatory Arthritis (IA) Clinic is located at the Surrey Memorial Hospital and provides services for people living with inflammatory arthritis. The clinic has therapists (occupational therapy and physical therapy) who are specifically trained to help you manage and treat the physical and mental impacts of rheumatoid arthritis.

Sarah Bryant, an occupational therapist at the Surrey IA Clinic, explains her work relationship with the clinic’s physical therapist: “We work in a transdisciplinary model, which means that we both train each other in the basics of our profession in rheumatology and that if you have something really specific to the discipline, you can see either one of us, as needed.” This transdisciplinary approach eliminates the stress associated with multiple visits to the clinic.

The services provided at the clinic are publicly funded and available for people living with inflammatory arthritis who are:

  • 18 years of age or older
  • diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis within the last two years
  • living in the Fraser Health region
  • have a rheumatologist’s referral to the Surrey IA Clinic

This video provides general information about what you should expect when you visit an occupational or physical therapist at the Surrey IA Clinic. For more information about the clinic or to schedule an appointment, please call 604-585-5666 (extension 778778).

To subscribers who live outside of British Columbia:

If you know of a clinic in your area of Canada that offers a similar program, please email us at feedback@jointhealth.org so that we may share it on our resources page.

Everything you need to know about the shingles vaccine (Shingrix®) if you have inflammatory arthritis or are on a biologic

Image of files and envelops

What is shingles?

Shingles (Herpes Zoster) is an infection that causes a painful skin rash and can lead to a variety of more complex, serious conditions. Shingles is caused by the varicella zoster virus (VZV), the same virus that causes chickenpox. VZV can stay in the nerve cells of an individual long after they recover from chickenpox. The virus may lay dormant for decades, and then reactivate and cause shingles when the individual’s immune system is more weak.

Individuals over the age of 50 have an increased risk of developing shingles as well as anyone who has a compromised immune system. Many people with inflammatory arthritis have a compromised immune system due to taking medications that partially or completely suppress the immune response of an individual.

What is different about Shingrix®?

Shingrix® is not a live vaccine, so individuals cannot develop shingles from the vaccine. Another shingles vaccine, called Zostavax®, is not suitable for individuals with a compromised immune system because it is a live vaccine.

Who should receive Shingrix®? Continue reading

Reminder: Call for patient input on tofacitinib (Xeljanz®) for psoriatic arthritis

Megaphone GraphicDo you have psoriatic arthritis or care for someone who does? We need your valuable input.

The Common Drug Review (CDR) is currently welcoming patients and their caregivers to provide input on the manufacturer’s submission for tofacitinib (Xeljanz®) for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) when the response to previous disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy has been inadequate.

The CDR is part of the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). The CDR conducts objective, rigorous reviews of the clinical and cost effectiveness of drugs, and provides formulary listing recommendations to the publicly funded drug plans in Canada (except Quebec).

To help them make their recommendations, the CDR accepts input from patient groups, like Arthritis Consumer Experts (ACE). We would like to gather your views and share them with the CDR.

These are the questions they are asking: Continue reading

Types of arthritis that make people more sensitive to sunlight

Lupus, psoriatic arthritis, and scleroderma are several types of arthritis that make people more sensitive to sunlight – either because of arthritis itself or the medications they take to treat it. It is important for these people to include sun protection as part of their self-management plan.

Stay sun safe image with beach essentialsThe sun radiates two types of “invisible” ultraviolet light that are harmful if you are exposed to it for a long period of time – ultraviolet A (UVA) can age the skin and ultraviolet B (UVB) can burn the skin. Both UVA and UVB can alter the DNA of skin cells, increasing the risk of skin cancer. For people living with lupus, psoriatic arthritis or scleroderma, sun exposure can make symptoms worse or increase damage to skin cells.

Sun sensitivity is a hallmark of lupus. People with lupus experience one or many of these symptoms:

  • “butterfly” rash over the bridge of the nose and the upper cheeks
  • scaly, purplish lesions on the face and neck
  • red, circular rashes on the chest, back and arms

Sun exposure can bring on these rashes or make existing rashes worse. Those with systemic lupus erythematosus find that exposure to the sun triggers a flare, including joint pain, fatigue, and fever.

Continue reading

Youth Sport Injury and Osteoarthritis

With summer upon us, millions of Canadian youth are participating in sport activities every day. Sport and recreation is a great way for youth to get exercise, socialize, develop teamwork skills and improve mental and physical health. Unfortunately, the benefits of sport also come with the risk of injury. In fact, one in three youth aged 11-18 years will sustain a sport-related injury that requires medical attention each year, with knee and ankle injuries being the most common. Research has shown that these youth sport injuries, if not treated properly, can lead to osteoarthritis (OA) within 15 years, specifically a form known as post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Youth sport injury can also lead to obesity later in life, which happens to be another major risk factor for OA. This means that youth with 1 major risk factor for OA (joint injury) are in danger of acquiring a second risk factor for the disease (obesity).

Osteoarthritis is caused by the breakdown of cartilage in the joints and affects more than 5 million Canadians nation-wide; the disease can cause moderate to severe pain, disability and even require surgery. Osteoarthritis symptoms generally appear 10-15 years after a joint injury, and by this time the disease is very difficult to treat. Unlike inflammatory arthritis, there are no medications to slow the disease process of osteoarthritis, so preventative measures are of even greater importance. The upside? We can ensure our youth take proper precautions to avoid injury and hugely minimize their risk of developing OA.

What can a coach or parent do to help?

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