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Qu’est-ce que le comité ACE a fait pour vous dernièrement ?

Qu’est-ce que le comité ACE a fait pour vous dernièrement ?

Voici quelques faits saillants survenus au cours du mois de la sensibilisation envers l’arthrite au Canada.

Vote XVOTEZ pour l’arthrite !

La prestation des soins de santé est peut-être une responsabilité provinciale, mais le gouvernement fédéral n’en joue pas moins un rôle important dans le financement des soins de santé et l’élaboration des politiques en santé.

Pour permettre à nos membres et abonnés de comparer les différentes plateformes en matière de soins de santé, nous avons posé au Parti conservateur du Canada, au Nouveau Parti démocratique, au Parti libéral du Canada et au Parti vert du Canada les mêmes quatre questions sur les problèmes majeurs auxquels font face les Canadiennes et Canadiens atteints d’arthrite. Le comité ACE affiche leurs réponses sur son site WebContinue reading

What has ACE done for you lately?

What has ACE done for you lately? Here’s a few highlights during Arthritis Awareness Month in Canada.

Vote XArthritis VOTES!

The delivery of healthcare may be a provincial responsibility, but the federal government also plays a significant role in funding healthcare and shaping healthcare policies.

To help our members and subscribers compare healthcare platforms, we asked the Conservative Party of Canada, the New Democratic Party of Canada, the Liberal Party of Canada and the Green Party of Canada the same four questionsabout top healthcare issues for Canadians living with arthritis. ACE is posting responses on our websiteContinue reading

Living well with arthritis: Tips from people like you

Bikers beside a river fist pumping in the airThe award-winning chef Seamus Mullen, athlete Aimée Espinoza of San Clemente, California, triathlete Dina Neils and Pain Talks Founder Alan Brewington are all successful people, who just happen to live with arthritis. Remember that you have arthritis, but it doesn’t have you.

In an interview with Everyday Health, Seamus Mullen, author of Hero Food and the chef and owner behind New York City’s Tertulia restaurant, said: “I think the first mistake I made was believing that life as I knew it was over. I really felt as though the rug was pulled from beneath me, and that I would never again be able to do the things I once loved doing.” Mullen was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 2007. He adds, “I really wish that, early on, I’d gotten to know more people who were living and functioning with RA, and that I’d learned more about what I could do as an individual to treat the disease, rather than depending so heavily on the medical community for answers.” Continue reading

Arthritis’ devastating impact on young adults

young adultsA recent Canadian research published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders found that older adults with arthritis are less likely than young and middle-aged adults to report worse outcomes that include more pain, sleep disturbance, and impaired mental health. Regardless of age, the researchers stress the importance of timely diagnosis and treatment for all ages in order to prevent or minimize arthritis-related impairment.

The study examined and compared the physical and mental health effects of arthritis in older Canadian adults (75+ years) and younger adults (20-44, 45-64, and 65-74 years). Led by Siobhan O’Donnell, MSc, an epidemiology researcher at the Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention in Ottawa, the study analyzed poll data on 4,565 respondents from the arthritis component of the 2009 Survey on Living with Chronic Diseases in Canada (a cross-sectional follow-up survey to the larger 2008 Canadian Community Health Survey). The survey looked at the following: Continue reading

Biomarker tests to help detect rheumatoid arthritis

hand holding test vialTreating rheumatoid arthritis (RA) early and aggressively is vitally important and can help to prevent crippling joint damage. Today specialists recommend a treatment plan that includes education, medication-often a combination of several different types of medication will be used in a person’s treatment plan-social support, appropriate amounts of range-of-motion, cardiovascular and muscle strengthening exercises, rest, vitamins and mineral supplements and a well-balanced diet. Biomarker tests may also help to detect RA and prevent further joint damage.

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Life-changing biologics: So close, yet so far

A person with a graduate hat and gownOliver Sachgau, a young university graduate living with juvenile arthritis, shared his medication treatment journey with the Globe and Mail this week. He was diagnosed with juvenile arthritis at the young age of 14. Throughout his high school and university years, he kept his arthritis symptom-free by taking the biologics Enbrel, which costs $1,800 a month and was thankfully covered under his family’s insurance plan.  When he graduated from university, he was no longer covered under his family’s health plan.

In the article, he said: “I’m not a unique case. Enbrel is part of a class of medication called biologics. For those who take them, biologics can perform miracles. But their high cost, which is rarely mitigated by medical coverage, has created a unique situation for thousands of Canadians who want, but can’t have, their life-changing medication.” The medication cost Canada’s public health plans more than half a billion dollars in 2013, for about 30,000 beneficiaries. Continue reading