Bienvenue au réseau de diffusion sur l'arthrite Arthritis Research Centre of Canada Arthritis Consumer Experts

Le Réseau de diffusion sur l’arthrite dans la liste Feedspot des 40 meilleurs…

Top 40 Arthritis Blog BadgeLe Réseau de diffusion sur l’arthrite dans la liste Feedspot des 40 meilleurs blogues et sites Web sur l’arthrite pour les personnes atteintes de cette maladie.

Le Réseau de diffusion sur l’arthrite (RDA) géré par le comité ACE (Arthritis Consumer Experts) : Actualités et information sur l’arthrite. En tout temps. Grâce à nos supporteurs, notre plus récent événement en direct sur Facebook a rejoint plus de 23 000 personnes en seulement trois jours !

C’est un honneur pour le Réseau de diffusion sur l’arthrite de figurer à la liste Feedspot des 40 meilleurs blogues et sites Web sur l’arthrite pour les personnes atteintes de cette maladie. Ce classement se fonde sur les critères suivants : Continue reading

Arthritis Broadcast Network named one of Feedspot’s Top 40 Arthritis Blogs

Top 40 Arthritis Blog BadgeArthritis Broadcast Network (ABN) – powered by Arthritis Consumer Experts – All your arthritis news and information. All the time. Thanks to our fans, our most recent Facebook Live event reached over 23,000 people in just three days!

Arthritis Broadcast Network is honoured to be named one of the top 40 arthritis blogs and websites for people living with arthritis by Feedspot. Rankings are based on the following criteria: Continue reading

Young generations reporting arthritis at an earlier age

Picture of youths in the park for arthritis articleA Canadian Study in Arthritis Care & Research concludes that young generations are reporting arthritis at an earlier age. The authors of the study believed it is linked to rising obesity rates.

The study looked at arthritis incidence in four different groups:

  • The World War II group (1935-1944) is the benchmark group.
  • The generation Xers (1965-1972), where the odds ratio for arthritis was 3.20.
  • The younger baby boomers (1955-1964), where the odds ratio for arthritis was 2.14.
  • The older baby boomers (1945-1954), where the odds ratio for arthritis was 1.48.

The study was conducted by Elizabeth Badley, PhD, of the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto, and her colleagues. Bailey and her team found that severely obese people were 2.5 times more likely than people with a normal body mass index (BMI). Continue reading

Adaptive clothes for people living with arthritis and other medical problems

Wardrobe full of clothesPutting on clothes can be a difficult task for people living with arthritis, limited mobility and range of motion, and other medical problems.

For someone living with arthritis, simple tasks, such as buttoning a shirt, tying shoelaces, or pulling up a zipper, are made difficult by joint pain and inflammation. Caregivers can help in this aspect but it can be a demeaning, intimate and tricky task for both parties. People with Alzheimer or dementia may also have trouble in dressing themselves. They may forget how to put on a shirt or which way the buttons face.

One way to make things easier is to use adaptive clothes. Adaptive clothes have details like Velcro tabs instead of zips and buttons, as well as adjustable or removable components that help to save time and reduce the risk of injury. “More importantly, this type of clothing improves one’s comfort and bolsters self-esteem,” said Ms. Punithamani Kandasamy, a registered nurse and caregiving trainer at Active Global Specialised Caregivers. In an interview with the Straight Times in Singapore, Ms. Punithamani explains how different types of adaptive apparel and footwear can be useful for both the wearer and the caregiver. Below is an excerpt from the interview: Continue reading

Do it for the kids! Juvenile arthritis: Exercise, models of care, and advocacy

Four kids playing at the park

In honour of Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month in Canada, we have compiled a list of interviews from this year’s CRA Annual Scientific Meeting & AHPA Annual Meeting in Ottawa. The interviews below highlight models of care, advocacy, clinical practices, and different therapy options for juvenile arthritis.  Continue reading

JointHealth™ insight – numéro de mars 2017: L’arthrite en milieu de travail

 JointHealth™ insight – numéro de mars 2017

Arthritis in the workplace - two human cartoon talkingL’arthrite en milieu de travail : Employeurs et employés parlent-ils le même langage ?

Dans ce numéro du JointHealth™ insight, le comité ACE (Arthritis Consumer Experts) s’attarde sur la situation actuelle de l’arthrite en milieu de travail. Découvrez pourquoi la Ville d’Ottawa et le Réseau de télévision des peuples autochtones figurent en tête de liste des meilleurs milieux de travail pour les employés atteints d’arthrite au Canada.

Dans ce numéro, vous trouverez également :

  • Un aperçu de la situation actuelle de l’arthrite en milieu de travail, avec les statistiques les plus récentes sur les coûts de l’incapacité au travail
  • Des suggestions concernant des mesures d’adaptation au travail les plus susceptibles d’aider les employés atteints d’arthrite
  • Des messages importants pour les employeurs
  • Des conseils pour les employés atteints d’arthrite

JointHealth™ insight – March 2017: Arthritis in the workplace

JointHealth™ insight – March 2017

Arthritis in the workplace: Are employers and employees speaking the same language? 

Arthritis in the workplace - two human cartoon talkingIn this issue of JointHealth™ insight, Arthritis Consumer Experts looks at the current state of arthritis in the workplace. Find out what makes the City of Ottawa and Aboriginal Peoples Television Network two of Canada’s best workplaces for employees living with arthritis.

In this issue, you will also find:

  • A summary on arthritis in the workplace, including the latest statistics about the cost of work disability
  • Suggestions on what kind of flexible work arragements would help workers with arthritis
  • Key messages for employers
  • Tips for employees living with arthritis

Frequent, brisk walks are beneficial for people with early-stage Alzheimer’s

Picture of person walking - feet onlyAccording to a recent study of physical activity as an experimental treatment for dementia, frequent, brisk walks are beneficial for people with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease because walking bolsters physical abilities and slow memory loss.

The study aimed to investigate how and why exercise helps some people with dementia, but not others. There are 1.1 million Canadians who are directly or indirectly affected by dementia. Globally, the disease affects more than 35 million people, a number that is expected to double within 20 years. There are currently no reliable treatments for the disease.

Past studies which focused on how exercise can prevent Alzheimer’s disease have shown the following:

  • There is a strong correlation between regular exercise and improved memories in healthy elderly people.
  • Physical active older people are less likely than those who are sedentary to develop mild cognitive impairment (a common precursor to Alzheimer’s disease).
  • When compared to sedentary people of the same age, physically fit older people have more volume in their brain’s hippocampus, the portion of the brain most intimately linked to memory function.

For the current study, researchers from the University of Kansas decided to work with people who had been given a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Because the disease can affect coordination as it progresses, the study initially looked at men and women with early stage Alzheimer. Study participants had to be living at home and be able to safely walk by themselves or perform other types of light exercise.

Continue reading