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April 21: Spondyloarthritis Information Session – Live stream or in-person in Halifax

The Canadian Spondylitis Association will be hosting a Spondyloarthritis Information Session tomorrow in Halifax!

You can join in-person in Halifax or on the live stream tomorrow morning from the comfort of your home from anywhere!

A picture of the Halifax Central Library where Spondyloarthritis info session will happenIf you are attending in person, the event will take place in the BMO Community Room on the second floor of the Halifax Central Library on Spring Garden Road. Registration starts at 9:15 am.

The live stream of the event will start at approximately 9:30 am AST/8:30 am EST/5:30 am PST. To join online, click the following link: http://www.spondylitis.ca/the-latest/live-event/ 

In case you are unable to access the link above, please try: https://livestream.com/45north/events/8157608

To ensure a smooth live streaming experience, make sure you have a strong internet connection or cellular network if you are participating from your mobile devices. To ask questions during the event, email questions@spondylitis.ca

Please ensure your volume is adjusted appropriately to hear the broadcast.

Virtual reality as pain management for workplace injuries

Researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Samsung, Travelers Insurance, Bayer and AppliedVR have teamed up in a new 16-month study to evaluate virtual reality (VR) for pain reduction and therapeutic purposes. The belief is that VR can potentially be a drug-free tool for pain management. Similar VR studies are happening in Canada. Earlier this year, researchers from Simon Fraser University’s Pain Studies Lab recruited people with and without arthritis to play their VR game. Their goal is to understand how VR can be used as a tool for enhancing physical activity, which can help reduce pain.

Image of a man wearing virtual reality VR glasses

 

According to Dr. Brennan Spiegel, director of health services research at Cedars-Sinai, the study will use technology from Samsung, Bayer and AppliedVR as a supplement to manage pain in patients with acute orthopaedic injuries of the lower back and extremities. The study will be funded by Travelers and Samsung. Dr. Spiegel added: “We need to find ways to stem the tide without relying entirely on medicines. Health technology, like virtual reality, has tremendous potential to improve outcomes while saving costs, which is why we’re so excited about this collaboration among academia and industry.”

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Exercise, arthritis and osteoporosis

Girl Stretching

Photo Credit: By marin/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The research literature on exercise is growing, and it is now generally accepted that there are many benefits of exercise for arthritis and osteoporosis. General benefits of exercise include improved heart and lung function, weight control, and improvement of self-esteem and self-confidence.

Before starting an exercise program, at home or at a gym, it is important to speak to a health professional trained in exercise for arthritis and osteoporosis. They can help you to design an exercise program that will be both safe and effective.

Before, during and after exercise:

  • It is important to warm-up and cool down before and after exercising. Use range of motion or heat.
  • If you are still experiencing pain more than two hours after exercise – you may have done too much.
  • Use slow, planned movements when doing ROM and strengthening exercises.
  • Practice in front of a mirror until you feel confident you are doing the exercise as demonstrated by your health professional.

Types of Exercise
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Younger patients getting knees and hips replaced. Is this an additional burden on the healthcare system?

New research shows that patients undergoing total joint replacement are younger now than they were in 2000. According to a review from the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database, the average patient undergoing a total hip replacement (THR) in 2014 was 64.9 years, while the average patient in 2000 was 66.3 years. In parallel, the average patient undergoing a total knee replacement (TKR) was 65.9 in 2014, and 68.0 in 2000.

Dr. Matthew Sloan, lead researcher and orthopaedic resident at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, tells Reuters Health by email: “These differences may not seem like much, but an average decrease of two years in a pool of 1 million people is a significant difference. It’s also a meaningful difference when you take into account the fact that these total joint replacements have a finite lifespan.”

Dr. Sloan further explains: “The technology for total hip and knee replacements continues to improve. However, at some point, the implant wears out. We believe modern implants without any unforeseen complications should last 20 years or more. The problem with an increasingly younger group of patients having these procedures, it becomes more likely that the implant will wear out during their lifetime. When this happens, a second surgery is required to revise the joint replacement. These procedures are not as successful as the initial surgeries, they are bigger operations, they take longer, and now the patient is 20 years older and not as strong as they were when they had the initial procedure.”

Because a second surgery is riskier and prone to complications like early failure or infection, the goal is to wait as long as possible so that a patient will undergo one surgery in their life. Other findings presented at the American Society of Orthopaedic Surgeon’s annual meeting include: Continue reading

Demande de rétroaction de patients sur le chlorhydrate de tapentadol (Nucynta) pour la gestion de la douleur intense

stick man with megaphone for patient inputÉprouvez-vous de la douleur intense ? Vos commentaires seraient précieux. 

Le programme commun d’évaluation des médicaments (PCEM) invite actuellement les patients et leurs fournisseurs de soins à faire parvenir aux organismes représentant les patients leurs suggestions et commentaires sur la présentation par le fabricant du chlorhydrate de tapentadol (Nucynta) pour la gestion de la douleur intense, suffisante pour nécessiter quotidiennement une thérapie continue à long terme aux opiacés et :

  • qui répond au traitement par des opiacés; et
  • pour laquelle les options alternatives de traitement sont inadéquates.

Le PCEM fait partie de l’Agence canadienne des médicaments et des technologies de la santé. Le PCEM examine avec objectivité et rigueur l’efficacité et la rentabilité des médicaments et fournit des recommandations aux régimes d’assurance-médicaments publics du Canada (à l’exception du Québec) quant à leur inscription sur la liste des médicaments assurés.

Afin de l’aider dans son processus de recommandation, le PCEM accepte la rétroaction de groupes et d’organisations de patients comme le comité ACE (Arthritis Consumer Experts). Parce que la rétroaction de patients est essentielle à la prise de décision du gouvernement sur les médicaments, nous désirons recueillir vos commentaires pour communication au PCEM.

Voici l’information que recherche le PCEM dans ce dossier particulier : Continue reading

Call for patient input on tapentadol hydrochloride (Nucynta) for the management of severe pain

stick man with megaphone for patient inputDo you have severe pain? We need your valuable input. 

The Common Drug Review (CDR) is currently welcoming patients and their caregivers to provide input to patient organizations on the manufacturer’s submission for tapentadol hydrochloride (Nucynta) for the management of pain severe enough to require daily, continuous, long-term opioid treatment, and:

  • that is opioid-responsive; and
  • for which alternative treatment options are inadequate.

The CDR is part of the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). The CDR conducts objective, rigorous reviews of the clinical and cost-effectiveness of drugs, and provides formulary listing recommendations to the publicly funded drug plans in Canada (except Quebec).

To help them make their recommendations, the CDR accepts input from patient organizations and groups, like Arthritis Consumer Experts (ACE). Because patient input is vitally important to government decision-making about medications, we would like to gather your views and share them with the CDR.

These are the questions they are asking: Continue reading

Complete this short “Co-Morbidity Survey” to stand-up to spondyloarthritis!

Please take a few minutes to complete a short survey to help the Canadian Spondylitis Association help you. 

Picture of a spine for the co-morbidity spondyloarthritis surveyA co-morbidity is not a side effect.

A focus of the Canadian Spondylitis Association (CSA) in 2018 will be on highlighting and educating members about co-morbidities that are associated with spondyloarthritis. The CSA are forming partnerships to bring you the education and support that you should have. Individuals are sometimes diagnosed because of a co-morbidity or by a professional outside of rheumatology. In some cases, diagnosis is delayed due to the complexities of spondyloarthritis and its many co-morbidities.

Stand-up to spondyloarthritis! Together we can make a difference. Please take a few minutes of your time to complete a short survey to help the CSA help you.

The CSA will be updating their website with information on co-morbidities and include articles in upcoming newsletters highlighting a co-morbidity.

Complétez ce court sondage pour tenir tête à la spondylarthrite!

S’il vous plaît, prenez quelques minutes afin de complétez ce court sondage pour aider l’Association Canadienne de Spondylarthrite à vous aider! 

Picture of a spine for the co-morbidity spondyloarthritis surveyUne co-morbidité n’est pas un effet secondaire.

En 2018, l’ACS mettra l’accent sur la sensibilisation et l’éducation des membres sur les co-morbidités associées à la spondylarthrite. Nous formons des partenariats pour vous apporter l’éducation et le soutien dont vous avez besoin. Les individus sont parfois diagnostiqués à cause d’une co-morbidité ou par un professionnel de la santé autre que la rhumatologie. Dans certains cas, le diagnostic est retardé en raison de la complexité de la spondylarthrite et de ses nombreuses co-morbidités.

Tenez tête à la spondylarthrite! Ensemble nous pouvons faire la différence. Veuillez prendre quelques minutes de votre temps pour remplir un court sondagepour nous aider – à vous aider.

Nous mettrons à jour notre site Web avec des informations sur les co-morbidités et incluant des articles, dans les prochains bulletins d’informations mettant en évidence une co-morbidité.

A #CRArthritis interview with Laura Nimmon – Social science in rheumatology

We had the privilege of chatting with Social Scientist Dr. Laura Nimmon at the Canadian Rheumatology Association (CRA) Annual Scientific Meeting and Arthritis Health Professions Association (AHPA) last month. Laura is an assistant professor in the Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, as well as a scientist at the Centre for Health Education Scholarship at the University of British Columbia. Laura shared her time with #CRArthritis and sat down with us to answer some questions we had. As patients, we find her research meaningful, and we think you will too! Below are some highlights of the in person interview.

What is a social scientist and what do they do?

Social science is a broad field but can generally be categorized by the study of human society and social relationships. Social scientists aim to understand how our society works and will often use the information they gather to create or promote change within the society.

As a social scientist, how did you become involved in rheumatology?

I entered into the field of rheumatology by being awarded The Arthritis Society Young Investigator Salary Award, which gave me an opportunity to do research in the area. My focus is on teamwork. I look at how healthcare teams coordinate patient centred care and some of the tensions and social dynamics that exist in these interactions. I am conducting this research alongside an incredible team of colleagues consisting of health professionals and patient partners; it is a wonderful combination of minds with different experiences and backgrounds.

Could you share with us the key messages from your presentation at the conference?

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Les entrevues vidéo de l’événement en direct #CRArthritis 2018 sur Facebook et Twitter sont maintenant disponibles sur Facebook et YouTube !

#CRArthritis 2018 channel cover pictureL’événement #CRArthritis en direct sur Facebook et Twitter réalisé par le Réseau de diffusion sur l’arthrite a permis de joindre plus de 94 205 personnes jusqu’à présent ! Merci à tous nos fans et abonnés !

Nous avons réussi ! L’événement en direct #CRArthritis sur Facebook et Twitter a été réalisé par le Réseau de diffusion sur l’arthrite (RDA) dans le cadre de la rencontre scientifique annuelle de la Société canadienne de rhumatologie et de l’Association des professionnels de la santé pour l’arthrite. À cette occasion, le Réseau a réalisé un total de 39 entrevues (7 de plus que l’an dernier) en un peu moins de 48 heures. Un grand merci à tous nos intervieweurs, interviewés et internautes qui ont participé à l’événement. Grâce à vous, l’événement #CRArthritis a pu informer et sensibiliser plus de 94 205 personnes jusqu’à présent. Nous qualifions l’expérience de grand succès et vous avez joué un rôle essentiel dans cette réussite – merci !

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