Bienvenue au réseau de diffusion sur l'arthrite Arthritis Research Centre of Canada Arthritis Consumer Experts

Le Réseau de diffusion sur l’arthrite figure au 5e rang de la liste Feedspot des 20 meilleures chaînes YouTube sur l’arthrite

Grâce à notre public toujours plus nombreux, le Réseau de diffusion sur l’arthrite (RDA), généré par le comité ACE (Arthritis Consumer Experts), est la chaîne canadienne offrant le plus de vidéos et ayant obtenu le plus de visionnements !

Feedspot Top 20 Arthritis YouTube Channel to follow badgeLe Réseau de diffusion sur l’arthrite figure au 5e rang de la liste Feedspot des 20 meilleures chaînes YouTube sur l’arthrite (en anglais seulement). Le classement est établi en fonction des critères suivants :

  • Nombre total des abonnés de la chaîne YouTube, des visionnements vidéo et des téléchargements vidéo
  • Qualité et cohérence des vidéos
  • Classement de recherche YouTube
  • Examen objectif and subjectif de l’équipe de rédaction et de révision Feedspot

Sur la liste de Feedspot, le RDA est la chaîne canadienne offrant le plus de vidéos et ayant obtenu le plus de visionnements – un total de 200 vidéos et de 242 489 visionnements ! La chaîne du Réseau de diffusion sur l’arthrite fournit de l’information sur les différentes formes d’arthrite, la gestion de la douleur, l’autotraitement, l’exercice, l’alimentation, les modèles de soins, l’engagement patient, la recherche et bien d’autres questions importantes pour la collectivité arthritique. Nous vous invitons à manifester votre soutien et à aider les autres personnes atteintes d’arthrite par les actions suivantes :

Arthritis Broadcast Network ranked #5 on Feedspot’s Top 20 Arthritis YouTube channels to Follow

Arthritis Broadcast Network ranked #5 on Feedspot’s Top 20 Arthritis YouTube channels to Follow

Thanks to our growing audience, Arthritis Broadcast Network (ABN) – powered by Arthritis Consumer Experts – has the most videos and views on a Canadian channel!

Feedspot Top 20 Arthritis YouTube Channel to follow badge

Arthritis Broadcast Network has been ranked #5 on the top 20 arthritis YouTube channels to follow by Feedspot. Rankings are based on the following criteria:

  • Total YouTube channel subscribers, video views, and video uploads
  • Quality and consistency of videos
  • YouTube search ranking
  • Feedspot editorial team’s objective and subjective review

On Feedspot’s list, ABN has the most videos and views on a Canadian channel – a total of 200 videos and 242,489 views!

Arthritis Broadcast Network’s channel provides information about the different types of arthritis, pain management, self-care, exercise, nutrition, models of care, patient engagement, research, and many other topics valuable to the arthritis community. Please show your support and help others living with arthritis by doing the following:

What is pain? What are EULAR’s guidelines for pain management?

Close up of a person's face wincing in painWhat is pain?

The International Association for the Study of Pain defines pain as “an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage”.

Pain is your body’s warning signal, letting you know that something is wrong in your body. When part of your body is injured or damaged, chemical signals are released that travel from nerve system cells (called neurons) to your brain where they are recognized as pain.

Most forms of pain can be divided into two general categories: Continue reading

Pain is one of the causes of arthritis-related fatigue

“I’m so tired”: arthritis and fatigue

For many people living with arthritis, “I’m so tired” is an often spoken phrase. Fatigue is their constant, very unpleasant companion. It is a symptom which is often overlooked or overshadowed by other concerns when treating arthritis, but it can be life-altering to people living with the disease.

Often, research into treatments for arthritis has focussed on other disease symptoms, sometimes leaving out the importance of managing fatigue. Some recent research, however, has focussed on fatigue, why it is harmful, and how it can be better treated.

In an article published in Clinical Care in the Rheumatic Diseases, Basia Belza and Kori Dewing examined fatigue in arthritis and described some strategies for dealing with fatigue and minimizing its impact.
A person who fell asleep on the couch and is covered in a blanketThis article cites other research to conclude that 80 – 100% of people living with certain types of inflammatory arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and fibromyalgia, live with fatigue. Most types of arthritis are associated with some fatigue, and it can be one of the most difficult symptoms to live with, and treat.

Fatigue has been defined as “usually or always being too tired to do what you want” (Wolf et al). For people living with extreme fatigue, completing even the simplest tasks, or participating in normal day to day activities, can feel nearly impossible. People who face fatigue as a symptom of their disease can simply feel “too tired” to do the things they want or need to do in their lives.

Causes of fatigue

There are several causes of arthritis-related fatigue, which very often occur together. Belza and Dewing note several causes of arthritis-related fatigue, including: Continue reading

Patient-Centred Care: training the next generation of health-care providers

Over the last decade, patient-centred care (PCC) has become a focus within rheumatology and in the broader healthcare community. Patient-centred care puts patients and their families at the forefront of the care that they receive. According to the British Columbia Patient-Centred Care Framework, patient-centred care incorporates the following key components:

  • Self-management;
  • Shared and informed decision-making;
  • An enhanced experience of health care;
  • Improved information and understand; and,
  • The advancement of prevention and health promotion activities.

This approach emphasizes patient-voice, information sharing and shared decision making – ensuring there is a collaboration between the patient, their family, and their health care provider(s). There should be a balance between the health professional’s knowledge and the patient’s personal knowledge, experiences and preferences. PCC is based around team work rather than a potentially unbalanced healthcare provider-patient relationship. PCC has been shown to increase patient satisfaction, improve self-management, and ultimately lead to better health outcomes. Health authorities, patient advocate groups, and researchers throughout Canada are working to make patient centred care a priority.

There are several challenges to delivering PCC on a systemic level. It requires a significant shift to the way in which the healthcare system operates, and perhaps more importantly, a significant shift in the culture of health care. An effective way of transitioning to PCC is to ensure that the next generation of health professionals have sufficient training in the area. An effective way to achieve this is to have students learn directly from patient advocates and patient educators. In October, the Pharmacy School at the University of British Columbia (UBC) led by example by doing exactly that.

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November 14: Osteoarthritis Action Alliance Lunch and Learn Webinar

EQUIP-ing OA Patients and Health Care Providers Through Patient Engagement in Research with Marie Westby and Cheryl Koehn

The OA Action Alliance Lunch & Learn webinars keep you up-to-date on the latest osteoarthritis research, news and activities. This particular webinar will feature Marie Westby and Cheryl Koehn and will take place on November 14, 2018 at 12:00 pm ET. Webinars are free and open to the public. Webinars are archived on the events page on the OA Action Alliance’s website and on their YouTube channel in case you missed one or can’t get enough!

Please click here to register for the webinar. Osteoarthritis Action Alliance webinar

Marie Westby, PT, PhD is the Physical Therapy Teaching Supervisor in the Mary Pack Arthritis Program in Vancouver, BC and holds a Clinician Scientist position in the Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, Vancouver.
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Yoga & Arthritis

The most recent EULAR recommendations for pain management in inflammatory arthritis and osteoarthritis (OA) include physical activity and exercise as a part of a patient’s treatment plan. Physical activity has been shown to significantly ease joint pain and increase mobility, for this reason, exercise is increasingly being prescribed by physicians and other healthcare providers.

Some examples of well-known and effective exercises for people with arthritis include walking, biking and swimming. These are low-impact aerobic exercises, meaning they will generally be easier on the joints and cause your heart rate to increase. Are there other activities that could also benefit people living with arthritis, such as yoga?

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Arthritis Research Canada is exploring the health benefits of everyday activities and needs your participation!

Researchers are recruiting individuals with and without inflammatory arthritis for a study that will explore the health benefits of everyday activities. While the main goal of this study is to explore the relationship between everyday activities and health outcomes of those with inflammatory arthritis, we are also asking people without arthritis to participate in order to determine how the relationship between everyday activities and health differs between groups. The research is conducted by a PhD trainee who is affiliated with Arthritis Research Canada and the University of British Columbia.
Clock image with daily activities icon
You are eligible if you:

  • Have inflammatory arthritis (with no other major health conditions) OR do not have inflammatory arthritis and are generally healthy
  • Are 19 years of age or older
  • Do not currently smoke

What’s involved?
Participants will attend a two-hour group session in British Columbia to fill out health and activity questionnaires, and provide blood samples using a pinprick blood test (five blood spots). Participants will receive a monetary honorarium in appreciation for their time, as well as reimbursement for any parking or transit expenses.

Why do this research?
Other than physical activity, there is little evidence regarding the types of activities or occupations that support living well with inflammatory arthritis. We aim to study the health benefits of people’s everyday activities, with an emphasis on social and creative characteristics of activities, among adults with and without inflammatory arthritis.

Interested? Have questions?
Contact Flora To-Miles
604.364.6223
fto-miles@arthritisresearch.ca

Unproven Stem Cell Clinics in North America

Despite the lack of scientific proof, stem cell therapy is becoming increasingly popular, with dozens of clinics open across Canada and hundreds in the United States. These clinics are offering treatment for a wide range of diseases including asthma, multiple sclerosis, crohn’s, osteoarthritis and inflammatory arthritis. A recent study found that Canadian businesses are making strong and unproven claims about the benefits of stem cell therapy. Advertisements intentionally use scientific language which can mislead consumers into thinking they are science-based therapies. While there are credible facilities that do stem cell transplants for conditions such as cancers of the blood, there isn’t sufficient research to support the safety and efficacy for treating other diseases such as osteoarthritis or inflammatory arthritis. As stated by researcher Leigh Turner on CTV news, “you have a lot of companies and clinics setting up shop and there’s this pretty big gap between the marketing claims they make and the current state of stem cell research.”  A different article exploring the boom of stem cell clinics in America, found that advertisements use patient testimonial to appeal to consumers, which may just be a result of the placebo effect.

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ACR News 3 – October 23, 2018

newspaper in mail slotACE is reporting from this week’s American College of Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals 2018 Annual Meeting. Here are some presentations that are important for arthritis patients.

The future of arthritis care and the next generation of arthritis specialists 

The Arthritis Alliance of Canada has looked carefully at how patients with arthritis receive timely diagnosis and treatment. Central to ensuring timely care is making sure there are adequate numbers of rheumatologists for making an early diagnosis and starting appropriate treatment. In 2015, the Canadian Rheumatology Association conducted a national workforce survey of rheumatologists across Canada. The survey found there is a current shortage of rheumatologists across the country that may worsen over the next 10 years because a third of the workforce reported plans to retire in the near future. This will occur at the same time as an expected increase in the number of arthritis patients within the next generation.
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ACR News 2 – October 22, 2018

newspaper in mail slotACE is attending this week’s American College of Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals 2018 Annual Meeting, the largest international gathering of arthritis researchers, clinicians, academics, patient advocates and arthritis health professionals. Here are some of today’s highlights:

Improving osteoarthritis management

There are currently more than 4.4 million Canadians living with osteoarthritis (OA). Within a generation (in 30 years), more than 10 million (or one in four) Canadians are expected to have OA. A 2017 study, “Productivity costs of work loss associated with osteoarthritis in Canada from 2010 to 2013,” found the rising rates of OA will cost the Canadian economy an estimated $17.5 billion a year in lost productivity by 2031 as the disease forces greater numbers of people to stop working or work less.

ACE and other members of the Arthritis Alliance of Canada have helped raise awareness with health care policy makers that OA is the leading cause of disability in older adults. One of Canada’s leading osteoarthritis researchers, Dr. Gillian Hawker, Sir John and Lady Eaton Professor and Chair of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto has stated: “the highest rates of OA are increasing fastest among young people (20-59 years), due largely to childhood obesity and knee injury. While effective therapies exist, the high prevalence of comorbidity in people with OA makes management challenging (as many of 90% of people with OA have at least one additional chronic condition – most often diabetes, heart disease and high blood pressure).”
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ACR News 1 – October 21, 2018

newspaper in mail slotMore than 15,000 clinicians, researchers, academics, patient advocates and arthritis health professionals from more than 100 countries are expected to gather at the American College of Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals 2018 Annual Meeting over the next six days in Chicago to exchange scientific and clinical information.

This year’s ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting will include 450 educational sessions. More than 700 speakers hailing from more than 20 countries will present as many as 3,000 abstracts to gain firsthand knowledge and access to new scientific and clinical findings.

Session topics will include newly proposed treatments for systemic lupus erythematosus and osteoarthritis, updated classification criteria for large vessel vasculitis and a look at current controversies regarding arthritis diseases and bone.
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