Bienvenue au réseau de diffusion sur l'arthrite Arthritis Research Centre of Canada Arthritis Consumer Experts

Life-changing biologics: So close, yet so far

A person with a graduate hat and gownOliver Sachgau, a young university graduate living with juvenile arthritis, shared his medication treatment journey with the Globe and Mail this week. He was diagnosed with juvenile arthritis at the young age of 14. Throughout his high school and university years, he kept his arthritis symptom-free by taking the biologics Enbrel, which costs $1,800 a month and was thankfully covered under his family’s insurance plan.  When he graduated from university, he was no longer covered under his family’s health plan.

In the article, he said: “I’m not a unique case. Enbrel is part of a class of medication called biologics. For those who take them, biologics can perform miracles. But their high cost, which is rarely mitigated by medical coverage, has created a unique situation for thousands of Canadians who want, but can’t have, their life-changing medication.” The medication cost Canada’s public health plans more than half a billion dollars in 2013, for about 30,000 beneficiaries. Continue reading

ROAR 2015: Osteoarthritis and You – What you can do NOW!

ROAR 2015 BannerROAR 2015: Osteoarthritis and You – What you can do NOW!

Join us at an interactive public forum hosted by the Arthritis Patient Advisory Board of Arthritis Research Canada.

What do a rheumatologist, an orthopaedic surgeon, a clinical bio- mechanist, a clinical health researcher and an arthritis patient/consumer advocate have in common? They are all osteoarthritis (OA) experts, who will speak at ROAR 2015.

What do people with OA want to know? We are honoured to have six speakers share their research with us, guided by topics that represent the patient voice.

What is ROAR?
Continue reading

JointHealth™ mensuel – septembre 2015

French Sep JHM BannerSeptembre est le mois de sensibilisation envers l’arthrite au Canada. Dans ce numéro du  mensuel JointHealth™, le comité ACE (Arthritis Consumer Experts) examine les modèles de soins pour l’arthrite inflammatoire à l’intention des décideurs en santé, des rhumatologues, des professionnels paramédicaux et autres professionnels de la santé afin d’améliorer la façon dont les soins sont administrés aux patients atteints de la maladie.

Voici quelques faits saillants de ce numéro du bulletin mensuel :

  • En quoi consistent les modèles de soins pour l’arthrite inflammatoire
  • Le fondement de la modernisation du traitement de l’arthrite inflammatoire au Canada
  • Rôle des patients atteints d’arthrite inflammatoire dans le développement d’une approche pancanadienne aux modèles de soins pour l’arthrite inflammatoire
  • Représentation schématique des modèles de soins

JointHealth™ monthly – September 2015

Sep JHM Banner

September is Arthritis Awareness Month in Canada. In this issue of  JointHealth™ monthly, Arthritis Consumer Experts (ACE) looks at Models of Care for Inflammatory Arthritis to improve the way healthcare is delivered to patients by the health policy decision makers, rheumatologists, allied health professionals and other health care providers who care for them.

Below are highlights from this month’s newsletter:

  • What is an inflammatory arthritis model of care
  • The foundation of modernizing IA care in Canada
  • The role of IA patients in the development of a pan-Canadian approach to inflammatory arthritis models of care
  • Models of care infographic

Do you have rheumatoid arthritis? This study is for you!

Online ToolDo you have rheumatoid arthritis and have you recently been recommended to START or SWITCH biologic medications?

Researchers at Arthritis Research Canada would like YOU to try the latest online tool to help make your treatment decisions. 

We are looking for people with rheumatoid arthritis across Canada to try a new online tool that helps to make decisions about using biologic medications.

If you have been recommended to consider starting or switching biologic medications, we invite you to participate in this study. You may be eligible if you:

  1. Have rheumatoid arthritis
  2. See a rheumatologist
  3. You are considering or reconsidering starting or switching biologics
  4. Have a valid email and internet access

We are more than halfway there! We now have 28 participants who have completed the study. Please help us reach our recruitment target of 55 participants.

The study will take about two hours to complete over a span of four to six weeks, and can be completed remotely.  Any information you provide will be completely confidential. An honorarium will be provided for your time.

If you would like more information, please contact Jasmina Memetovic, Research Coordinator by phone at 604-207-4007, toll free 1-877-871-4575, or email

Ways to help your loved one live with RA and depression

Rheumatoid arthritis can increase the chances of depression; depression may worsen RA symptoms, leading to higher disease activity and disability, which in turn can lead to depression. Several studies have indicated that depression in those with rheumatoid arthritis is linked to greater joint pain and other symptoms of RA such as fatigue and sleep disturbances, decreased immune function, and a higher mortality rate. Untreated depression may cause you to be less likely to take care of yourself, less motivated to stick to a treatment plan, more likely to isolate yourself from friends and family and avoid activities you once enjoyed.

It is estimated that people living with RA are twice as likely to suffer from depression. Research shows that approximately 13 to 20 percent of the population currently living with RA are already depressed. A study published in the Rheumatology medical journal states that women living with RA are almost twice as likely to have suicidal thoughts and commit suicide.

“Many people with suicidal thoughts brought on by chronic illness will not come out right and say what they are thinking,” said Thea Barrieau, a SeniorBridge Care Manager. If you are concerned that someone you know are having suicidal thoughts, look out for the following suicidal warning signs and seek help from a medical professional:

  • Gathering friends and family “one last time” or “to say goodbye”.
  • Verbal or physical signs that allude to an inability to “cope” with the chronic illness, giving up, or a lack of motivation to do everyday and new tasks.
  • Skipping medication dosages or trying a new medication regimen.

It’s not your fault you are depressed

Continue reading