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JointHealth™ insight – Édition 2017 de la fiche-rapport et du guide des médicaments JointHealth™ contre l’arthrite

Dixième version annuelle de la fiche-rapport et du guide des médicaments du comité ACE : évolution du contexte de l’accès au remboursement des médicaments contre l’arthrite, à l’échelle du pays

de la fiche-rapport et du guide des médicaments du comité ACE bannerLe comité ACE (Arthritis Consumer Experts) a publié la dixième version annuelle de la fiche-rapport et de son guide des médicaments JointHealth™ contre l’arthrite – l’outil de référence rapide et fiable vous permettant d’évaluer la performance de votre province en matière de remboursement des médicaments dans le traitement des formes d’arthrite inflammatoire.

Commentant l’évolution du contexte du remboursement des médicaments contre l’arthrite, la présidente du comité ACE, Cheryl Koehn, indiquait : « Toute nouvelle politique pharmaceutique promettant de réaliser d’importantes économies au chapitre des régimes d’assurance-médicaments se doit de le faire sans compromettre l’efficacité et l’innocuité des médicaments pour les patients. Le comité ACE a toujours affirmé que toute économie réalisée par un régime d’assurance-médicaments grâce à des modifications dans la politique qui affectent l’accès au remboursement des médicaments contre l’arthrite devrait être réinvestie dans le budget d’inclusion de médicaments à la liste remboursable afin de permettre l’ajout de nouveaux médicaments contre l’arthrite et le soutien d’initiatives connexes améliorant les modèles de soins pour le traitement de l’arthrite, comme la création de codes de facturation pour les soins en rhumatologie. »

La fiche-rapport et le guide des médicaments JointHealth™ contre l’arthrite contiennent de l’information sur les médicaments les plus souvent prescrits dans le traitement des formes d’arthrite inflammatoire telles que la polyarthrite rhumatoïde, la spondylarthrite axiale, l’arthrite psoriasique ou l’arthrite juvénile idiopathique.

Ce numéro du JointHealth™ insight traite, entre autres, des sujets suivants :

  • Une évolution constante dans le remboursement des médicaments contre l’arthrite au Canada
  • Consultation du ministère de la santé sur la réglementation des prix des médicaments
  • Nouveau programme de médicaments essentiels en Colombie-Britannique
  • Programme d’assurance-maladie pour les jeunes en Ontario
  • Les politiques en matière de médicaments et la politique au Canada

À propos de la fiche-rapport
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JointHealth™ insight – The JointHealth™ Arthritis Medications Report Card and Medications Guide Edition

Arthritis Consumer Experts’ 10th Annual Arthritis Medications Report Card and Medications Guide: The changing landscapes of reimbursement for arthritis medications in Canada

JointHealth™ insight banner on Arthritis Medications Report Card and Medications GuideArthritis Consumer Experts (ACE) has released its 10th Annual JointHealth™ Arthritis Medications Report Card and Medications Guide – the reliable, quick reference tool to help you evaluate where your province ranks in terms of providing reimbursement for medications to treat inflammatory forms of arthritis.

Commenting on the changing landscape for reimbursement of arthritis medications, ACE President, Cheryl Koehn stated: “Any new pharmaceutical policy that promises to deliver significant drug plan savings must do so without compromising patient safety and efficacy. ACE has also consistently advocated that any drug plan cost savings related to changes in policy that affect arthritis medication reimbursement access should be reinvested back to drug formulary budgets to support the listing of new arthritis medicines and other non-medication related initiatives to improve models of arthritis care such as creating rheumatology nursing billing codes.”

The JointHealth™ Arthritis Medications Report Card and Medications Guide gives you information on the most commonly prescribed medications for inflammatory types of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, axial spondyloarthritis, psoriatic arthritis or juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

In this JointHealth™ insight, topics covered include:

  • The changing landscapes of reimbursement for arthritis medications in Canada
  • The federal health department consultation on medication pricing regulations
  • The essential drugs program initiative in British Columbia
  • The Children and Youth Pharmacare plan in Ontario
  • Medication policies and politics in Canada

About the Report Card
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The Big Sick film highlights writer’s real-life battle with adult-onset Still’s disease

The Big Sick film highlights writer’s real-life battle with adult-onset Still’s disease. The Big Sick film is based on the real-life courtship between Silicon Valley actor Kumail Nanjiani and his wife, writer Emily V. Gordon. In the movie, Zoe Kazan portrays Gordon onscreen, and Holly Hunter and Ray Romano play her parents.

The Big Sick film cast will cast light on adult-onset Still's disease

The romantic dramedy portrays how the married co-writers dealt with the extremely rare form of arthritis that brought them together 10 years ago. Back then, Gordon was a therapist in Chicago and has been together with the then standup comedian Nanjiani. Gordon’s initial symptoms were similar to a cold. She thought she had a really bad cold or pneumonia. She fainted in the middle of getting an X-ray and was rushed to the emergency room.

Gordon was eventually diagnosed with adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD), a rare form of arthritis that can shut down major organs if untreated. Adult Still’s disease is characterized by high fevers, inflammation of the joints, and a salmon-coloured rash on the skin. It can either be chronic or episodic (having flare-ups a few times a year). In children, this disease is known as systemic onset juvenile rheumatoid arthritis; when it occurs in people over age 15, it is known as adult Still’s disease. In Gordon’s case, AOSD affected her lungs, causing water to accumulate in her lungs. As a result, she had trouble breathing. Continue reading

On June 25, run for kids with arthritis and their families!

Join Cassie and Friends for their Scotiabank 5K & Half Marathon Team to raise money for all the kids affected by juvenile arthritis and other rheumatic diseases in BC.

Cassie and Friends Team for Scotiabank 5k for kidsOver the last 10 years, Team Cassie and Friends has laid it all on the course for kids with arthritis. Their team of 100 runners and walkers, from toddlers to grandparents, have transformed the lives of kids and families diagnosed with Juvenile Arthritis and other rheumatic diseases in BC and across Canada.

But, there is still so much more we can do to support and connect families, fund critical research and raise awareness – we hope you’ll join Cassie and Friends! Make a gift or sign up to be a part of their team. Cassie and Friends has created a virtual run for those who are unable to attend the Vancouver event.

Click here to register. Please use charity pin codes (all child registrations will be reimbursed): 5K -17CFS5K or Half Marathon– 17CFS21K

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Jennifer Wilson at jennifer@cassieandfriends.ca or visit cassieandfriendsrun.ca or David Porte at david@porte.ca

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Maud Lewis: Canadian folk artist and juvenile arthritis champion

Canadian folk artist Maud Lewis is a legend in Nova Scotia and in our eyes, a role model to people living with juvenile arthritis. The story of Maud Lewis came to life on the big screen with Maudie, a biopic released in June. The movie features Sally Hawkins as Lewis and Ethan Hawke as her husband Everett. The film, directed by British filmmaker Aisling Walsh and written by Canadian screenwriter Sherry White, focuses on Lewis’s resilience as an artist, despite hardships. The pictures in this article is from Artsy‘s editorial The Joyous World of Overlooked Canadian Folk Artist Maud Lewis.

Maud Lewis painting, painter with juvenile arthritis

Photo from Artsy: Maud Lewis, Oxen in Spring, ca. 1960s. Courtesy of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia.

 

Maud Lewis (1903-1970) grew up in the seaside town of Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. She was diagnosed with juvenile arthritis at a young age. Her arthritis left her with a pained and crooked gait. People would make fun of her because she looked and walked different. Her arthritis pain forced her to stay indoors at her parents’ home.  It was here that she began to draw.

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EULAR 2017 update on JIA: Never too young; Never too late

EULAR BannerAt this year’s annual EULAR 2017 annual congress, attendees learned about the need for increased collaboration between adult and paediatric rheumatologists to improve outcomes of adults living with active juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

According to conclusions from a review of more than 50 studies and approximately 3,000 JIA patients, half of adults living with JIA were not receiving adequate treatment, despite the fact that biological have been shown to improve the quality of life in children with JIA, with most of these benefits of treatment in childhood persisting into adulthood.

Presenting the results of her study, Dr. Berit Flato from the rheumatology department at Oslo University Hospital said: “Since 2000, biological and methotrexate have been prescribed earlier in JIA, resulting in increased rates of inactive disease after 1-3 years. Yet, recent reports indicate that only half of adult patients with JIA are on synthetic or biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARDs).

The inadequate treatment identified in the study partly explains why adults with JIA often experience more pain, poorer health-related quality of life, and lower employment rates.

ACE Founder and President, Chery Koehn, related the study results to the Canadian environment: “The reasons why many adult patients with JIA in Canada fall through this treatment gaps are many. A large factor is the transition of children with JIA from paediatric care to adult care, which often is not as smooth as it should be.”

Cassie and Friends Banner for JIA
JIA affects approximately 24,000 children and teens in Canada, making it one of the most common causes of chronic disability in children. JIA can be devastating and comes with high financial, family and societal burdens. Approximately 60% of children will have active disease into childhood. For more information about JIA, please visit Cassie and Friends, the only charity in Canada dedicated 100# to the paediatric rheumatic disease community (Cassie & Friends).