All posts related to "research"

Have you started talking about biologic medications for Rheumatoid Arthritis with your doctor?

Super Study bannerThe latest online tool to help make your treatment decisions.

We are looking for people to participate in a study to determine the usefulness of a web-based program designed to aid people with rheumatoid arthritis in making decisions to start or switch biologics.

If you have started discussing STARTING OR SWITCHING BIOLOGICS with your doctor, we invite you to participate in this study.

You may be eligible if you:

  1. Have a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis
  2. See a rheumatologist
  3. Have started discussing switching or starting biologic medication with your doctor
  4. Have a valid email and internet access

This study can be completed from home or anywhere with internet access. Any information you provide will be completely confidential. An honorarium will be provided for your time.

If you would like more information, please contact Jasmina Geldman, Research Coordinator by phone at 604-207-4007, toll free 1-877-871-4575, or email jgeldman@arthritisresearch.ca. Please also visit our UBC Study Website for more information.

Indigenous children expresses pain through art

The Aboriginal Children’s Hurt and Healing Initiative wanted to answer one simple question: What does pain look like? Not what it feels like, but what pain would look it if you had to express it on paper, or in this case, canvas.

In an interview with CBC News, John Sylliboy, community research co-ordinator with the Aboriginal Children’s Hurt and Healing Initiative, said: “Aboriginal children feel and experience pain just like anyone else. It’s just that they express their pain very differently. They don’t necessarily verbalize their pain, or they don’t express it outwardly through crying or through pain grimaces. A lot of kids, they just suck it up. That’s what they say all the time. ‘We just suck it up.'”

The research study spawned in 2008 when Margot Latimer, a clinical scientist at the Centre for Pediatric Pain Research at the IWK Health Centre in Halifax, observed there was no First Nations youth being referred to their pain clinic at the IWK hospital.

One of the paintings from the children

“My painting is about pain and the black represents how she feels inside. But she has like this white kind of atmosphere and it separates it from her pain.” – Artist, 16-year-old
Source: http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/aboriginal-youth-art-pain-hurt-healing-1.3852646?cmp=rss

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Canadians recognized at 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting

Congratulations to Dr. Carter Thorne and Dr. Claire Bombardier!

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) announced the 2016 recipients of its Master of the ACR designation and Distinguished Fellow Award honours during the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington D.C. These recognitions are given annually to members who exhibit outstanding contributions to the field of rheumatology.

drcarterthorneDr. Carter Thorne receives Master of the ACR designation
ACE wishes to congratulate Carter Thorne, MD, FRCPC, FACP, Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario, Canada/ University of Toronto, for recognition as a Master – one of the highest honors that the ACR awards to its members. The designation of Master is conferred on ACR members, age 65 or older, who have made outstanding contributions to the field of rheumatology through scholarly achievement and/or service to their patients, students, and the rheumatology profession. These honorees have devoted their long careers to furthering rheumatology research and improving clinical standards in the treatment of rheumatic diseases.
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SPINACH-project: SupPortIng seNiors And Caregivers to stay mobile at Home

SPINACH-project: SupPortIng seNiors And Caregivers to stay mobile at Home

Participants sought for short evaluation of online module with options how to stay independent at home when aging

A picture of two seniors

 

Decisions about how to stay independent at home are difficult ones for seniors, and we often hear that they do not know what their options are to do so.

We have created an online module (webpage) for seniors and caregivers who are facing decisions (with their health professionals) about how to stay independent at home. We are currently looking for seniors and caregivers that are willing to have a look at our module (as long as you like), and fill out a one-time questionnaire with your evaluation of it (10-15 minutes). With your help we can improve the module to meet your needs.  Continue reading

ACR News: Exercise for Arthritis

Today at the ACR annual meeting, attendees at a symposium on the benefits of exercise heard presenters encourage arthritis patients to include physical activity into their treatment, something that was unheard of at a meeting like this 20 years ago.

A picture of people's legs walking on a cross walkDr. Vilet Vlieland, Professor in the Department of Orthopaedics, Rehabilitation and Physical Therapy at Leiden University Medical Centre in the Netherlands, said it’s important for an experienced therapist to implement tailor-made exercise programs for arthritis patients, consisting of routine and planned activities, monitored by regular assessments.
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ACR News: Aboriginal community could provide clues in understanding arthritis for all consumers

Picture of Dr. Hani El GabalawyACE is sharing the latest research news from this year’s American College of Rheumatology annual meeting (ACR) in Washington, DC. 

The ACR is a gathering of more than 16,000 arthritis researcher, clinicians and patients from around the world to discuss the newest science about arthritis prevention, care and treatment. This week ACE will share the daily news from the ACR and interviews with arthritis leaders making a difference for you.

Arthritis can affect aboriginal people in North America differently than other ethnic groups. At a clinical symposium at the ACR – Rheumatic Diseases in Native Americans: What Can We Learn, How Can We Help? – conference attendees heard how the unique responses of aboriginal populations to arthritis have lessons for the rest of the arthritis community. Continue reading