All posts related to "research"

Today’s weather: Cloudy with a Chance of Pain

Today’s weather: Cloudy with a Chance of Pain 

Cloudy with a chance of Pain Logo

In the movie Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, Flint Lockwood invented a machine to convert water into food and becomes a local hero in his economically unstable town when food fall from the sky like rain. Like Flint’s intention to solve the town’s crisis, British researchers are now hoping to solve the ancient theory that there is an association between pain and weather.

In 400 B.C., the Greek philosopher Hippocrates noted that changes in the weather can affect pain levels. Throughout history, popular culture adapted the belief and coined terms such as “feeling under the weather”. People claimed to be able to forecast storms and rain because they “can feel it in their bones”. In a study report titled “Pain complaint and the weather: weather sensitivity and symptom complaints in chronic pain patients“, author Shutty MS Jr. recalls a Journal of the American Medical Association publication in 1929 that said there was strong evidence that “warm weather is beneficial and barometric pressure changes are detrimental to patients with arthritis.” Continue reading

Denosumab maintains bone quality in rheumatoid arthritis

Japanese LanternsA recent study from Keio University School of Medicine in Tokyo showed that denosumab inhibited the progression of bone erosion and increased bone mineral density (BMD) in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who were on methotrexate. This study confirmed the findings of an earlier study conducted in the U.S. and Canada.

The study followed 350 patients who have lived with RA for 6 months to less than 5 years’ duration. They were randomized to receive placebo or denosumab in doses of 60 mg every 6 months, every 3 months, or every 2 months. Participants were grouped together according to their glucocorticoid use and rheumatoid factor (RF) status at baseline. Throughout the study, they continued taking methotrexate at 6 to 16 mg/week and were treated with supplemental vitamin D and calcium. Researchers found that the changes from baseline in modified Sharp erosion score at 12 months were lower in the denosumab groups than in the placebo group. Continue reading

New treatment allows medications to be delivered to cartilage

image of knee joint

Image courtesy of cooldesign at FreeDigitalPhoto.net

Researchers from the Queen Mary University of London have developed a new treatment that can deliver drugs directly into cartilage – tissue reviously thought to be impenetrable. The treatment uses tiny particles of a patient’s own cells to carry the medications into affected joints.

In an interview with the Express, Professor Mauro Perretti of Queen Mary University of London said: “Cartilage has long been thought to be impenetrable to cells and other small structures leading to strong limitations in our abilities to deliver therapies for arthritis.” The new treatment would only require patients to visit the hospital once every three months and would not cause the side-effects associated with other therapies. Continue reading

Survey on pregnancy and parenting with arthritis

pregnant woman with childThe information obtained through this survey will be analyzed and used to develop an educational resource for pregnancy and parenting with arthritis.

Arthritis affects individuals in many aspects of their life, including decisions regarding pregnancy and in carrying out their role as a parent. As a result, the Canadian Arthritis Patient Alliance has launched a project to identify patient information needs as it relates to pregnancy and parenting.

The survey is intended for individuals living with arthritis and for people in their social support network. The information obtained through this survey will be analyzed and used to develop an educational resource for pregnancy and parenting with arthritis.

Share your perspective by taking the survey and help shape the development of this important resource! The survey will take approximately 10 minutes to complete.

Digital Health Technologies: Improving outcomes in paediatric chronic pain

Child and adult Hand HoldingThe Canadian Institute for the Relief of Pain and Disability (CIRPD) regularly hosts free webinars. The next one, conducted in partnership with Pain BC and the Canadian Pain Coalition, will be on Wednesday, December 9 at 9:30 am PST (12:30 pm EST). The Digital Health Technologies: Improving Outcomes in Paediatric Chronic Pain webinar will look at how the use of digital health technologies has facilitated access to appropriate and timely care.  Continue reading

Arthritis Alliance of Canada’s AGM & Research Symposium

AAC Symposium PosterThe Arthritis Alliance of Canada’s (AAC) Annual General meeting and Research Symposium will be held this Thursday and Friday, October 22 and 23 at the Delta Lodge Hotel at Kananaskis, Alberta. The Symposium, entitled “New Directions in Osteoarthritis Research”, will look ahead at promising approaches for future studies, and identify knowledge gaps and research opportunities.

The AAC workshops will focus on building capacity in research and healthcare sustainability. The programme will bring together scientists, engineers, healthcare providers, trainees, specialists, key stakeholders and most importantly, people living with arthritis.

On Thursday evening, guests will attend “Dr. Cy Frank and The Rocky Mountain Pioneers”, a special gala tribute dinner to honour the accomplishments and legacy of Dr. Cy Frank, who was a talented orthopaedic surgeon, skilled researcher, policy maker, and champion for patient. The winner for the Qualman-Davies Arthritis Consumer Community Leadership Award will also be announced. This prestigious award is given to a person with arthritis who has, or is, providing leadership in the community and deserves recognition for their valuable volunteer work.