All posts related to "research"

Arthritis ‘pacemaker’ on the horizon

Graphic explanation of how the arthritis 'pacemaker' worksAn arthritis ‘pacemaker’ is on the horizon. The device is a tiny electronic implant fitted under the skin near the collarbone. It works by sending electrical pulses to the vagus nerve. When the vagus nerve is stimulated by the electric pulse, it sends a signal from the brain to key organs such as the spleen and triggers a decrease in the production of cytokines. Cytokines are proteins that help regulate the immune system and can cause inflammation in joints.

The arthritis ‘pacemaker’ is currently being tested in the Netherlands with people who live with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Scientists found that the use of electrical pulse can have a similar positive effect on RA without the side effects of medications.  The medical device should be available in the United Kingdom by 2020. A patient who took part in the pilot study said: “I have my life back, like before I got arthritis.”

In an interview with the Daily Mail, Clare Jacklin of the National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society cautions: “The disease is different in different people. This new device may well be impactful for some patients dependent on their disease profile.”

What are your thoughts? Would you use the arthritis ‘pacemaker’? Continue reading

ROAR 2016 – Action on Arthritis: Steps to a better you

ROAR2016 bannerROAR 2016 – Action on Arthritis: Steps to a better you

Join us at an interactive public forum hosted by the Arthritis Patient Advisory Board of Arthritis Research Canada.


What is ROAR?

With rapid changes in access to health care information and health technologies, managing your chronic disease is becoming more collaborative and patient-centred. The ROAR public forum features a group of researchers from Arthritis Research Canada who are at the forefront of these changes. They will share what the latest research, developed in collaboration with patients, is telling us about arthritis care and self-management. Updates on current research will be presented in a relaxed and informative series of talks for people with arthritis and those who care for them. Bring your questions, as this is an interactive forum.

Date: Saturday, October 1st, 2016
Time: 9:30am – 12:30pm (PDT) Continue reading

Expressions of Interest: Arthritis Research Ambassadors

Expressions of Interest: CIHR Institute of Musculoskeletal Health and Arthritis Research Ambassadors

Three people standing togetherThe Institute of Musculoskeletal Health and Arthritis of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR – IMHA), is seeking applications to fill four vacancies in the CIHR – IMHA Research Ambassadors group. We specifically need representation from young adults, men, vulnerable populations, and representation of disease groups falling under our research mandate including conditions affecting bone, connective tissue, joint, muscle, oral health and skin.

WHO: Research Ambassadors are members of the public who live with, or advocate for others living with a condition that falls under CIHR – IMHA’s research mandate (conditions related to bones, joints, muscles, connective tissue, skin and teeth). Research Ambassadors bridge the gap between researchers and patients, addressing the different stages of the research process known as: Basic Biomedical Science, Clinical Science and Knowledge, and Clinical Practice and Health Decision Making.

WHAT: The main principles of what Research Ambassadors do are: Continue reading

Great news for ACE’s scientific advisor, Arthritis Research Canada

New Canadian Institutes of Health Research funding, awards, and promotions at Arthritis Research Canada will advance arthritis research, treatment and care

Two kids in the sun with hands held highACE’s scientific advisor, Arthritis Research Canada (ARC), has been awarded two Canadian Institutes of Health Research Knowledge to Action grants. Here are the names of the award recipients and a brief explanation of their research projects:

  • Dr. Deborah Marshall’s research, entitled “Building Partnerships to Improve Care of Early Knee Osteoarthritis Patients: Co-developing a Risk Management Tool” aims to develop a tool to help family physicians to motivate people with early osteoarthritis of the knee to institute life-style changes at a time when they can make a difference to the progress of the disease.
  • Dr. Paul Fortin’s research, entitled “Dissemination of the Lupus Interactive Navigator (LIN) – Measuring its Uptake and Impact on Global Health and Self-Care” will be devoted to developing an online tool to facilitate and support engagement, coping and self-management in people with lupus.

The following researchers at ARC have each been awarded a prestigious award from the science community: Continue reading

Researchers, patients and government come together

Researchers, patients and government come together

The conversation on new reform from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research that impacts federal research funding continues.

Picture of pen and paperWe commend Minister Philpott for her request for the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) to convene a working meeting with key representatives of the research community to find common ground and move forward with solutions that address the issues around the quality and integrity of CIHR’s peer review system.

Minister Philpott’s actions are in response to views expressed within the health research community, and from patient organizations like Arthritis Consumer Experts (ACE).

All stakeholders in healthcare – governments, researchers, clinicians and patients – have an obligation to consider the impact of changes to the CIHR and Canada’s world-class standing in the scientific community and the benefits of health research for all Canadians.

Below is the message from Minister Philpott to Canada’s health research community: Continue reading

Happy 155th Birthday Nettie Stevens!

Happy 155th Birthday to Nettie Stevens!

science students workingGoogle paid a tribute to Nettie Stevens today. Stevens was a pioneering American female geneticist and one of the first to be recognized for her contribution to science. She had a brief career as a high school teacher for physiology and zoology before becoming a scientist. As a scientist, Stevens published about 40 papers and is credited for her success in expanding the field of embryology and genetics.

Do you have a favourite science teacher or researcher in your life? Share your stories about how this person inspires you.  Continue reading