All posts related to "rheumatoid arthritis"

JointHealth™ monthly: Having summer fun with arthritis

JointHealth monthly Title PageJointHealth™ monthly: Having summer fun with arthritis

The key ingredients to a healthy dose of summer fun include taking care of your body by eating well, maintaining a healthy body weight, adhering to your treatment therapy, and doing the right kinds of exercise properly.

In this issue of JointHealth™ monthly, you will find out the benefits of outdoor summer exercise for people living with arthritis and learn ways in which people living with arthritis can enjoy summer. As well, you will learn:

  • How to play tennis or golf safely with arthritis.
  • How you can optimize your biking experience.
  • What you can do to minimize pain when travelling, camping, or hiking with arthritis.
  • Which beach and poolside books or films offer insights into living with arthritis.
  • How you can help raise awareness for arthritis during Arthritis Awareness Month in Canada in September by downloading the ArthritisID and ArthritisID PRO apps.

Call for patient input on subsequent entry biologic infliximab (Remsima™ and Inflectra™)

Call for patient input on subsequent entry biologic infliximab (Remsima™ and Inflectra™) for ankylosing spondylitis, plaque psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and/or rheumatoid arthritis

Megaphone GraphicDo you have ankylosing spondylitis, plaque psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and/or rheumatoid arthritis or care for someone who does? We need your valuable input.

Health Canada defines subsequent entry biologics (SEBs) as biologic medicines that are similar to, and would enter the market after an approved innovator biologic (such as Remicade®). 

Unlike the more common small-molecule drugs, biologics generally exhibit high molecular complexity, and are sensitive to changes in manufacturing practices. SEBs are not identical to their innovator products because their chemical characteristics cannot be precisely duplicated during the manufacturing process. Therefore, SEBs may have unique efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety profiles that are different from their innovator products.
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Reminder: Patient input on treatment for rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis needed

Metal Alarm ClockDo you have rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis or care for someone who does? We want your valuable input.

In July, Arthritis Consumer Experts sent out the following JointHealth™ expresses announcing that we are gathering patient input to submit to the Common Drug Review (CDR). Follow the links below to view the questions for each patient input request.

The CDR is part of the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). The CDR conducts objective, rigorous reviews of the clinical and cost effectiveness of drugs, and provides formulary listing recommendations to the publicly funded drug plans in Canada (except Quebec). 

To help them make their recommendations, the CDR accepts input from patient groups, like Arthritis Consumer Experts (ACE). We would like to gather your views and share them with the CDR.

If you live with rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis or care for someone with the disease, please send us your input by Wednesday, August 20, 2014, so that we may submit a report by the August 28 deadline. Your input will be anonymous.

Please contact us at info@jointhealth.org to provide your input or arrange for a phone interview at 604-974-1366.

Rheumatologists should ask “How’s your sex life?”

Couple close togetherOne of the main goals of the PRECISION project, showcased in July’s issue of JointHealth™ monthly, is to enable clients to lead a healthy life in the context of their chronic disease. Besides medical adherence, rheumatologists should also express concern about their patient’s sex life and ask, “How’s your sex life?”

In an interview with The Rheumatologist, Alex Shteynshlyuger, MD, a New York urologist, said that more than half of all rheumatoid arthritis patients have difficulties with sex and yet the topic gets little attention from rheumatologists.

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JointHealth™ monthly: PRECISION Inflammation Elimination

Title Page for JointHealth monthly

PRECISION Inflammation Elimination

Today, Arthritis Consumer Experts (ACE) unveils the details of an exciting new study—called PRECISION—that re-examines models of care for the three most common types of autoimmune arthritis.

Developed by an expert team of researchers in statistics, epidemiology, and rheumatology, PRECISION looks at arthritis and its associated complications in a way that sets it apart from previous research on the disease.

In this issue of JointHealth™ monthly, you will find out who is behind the PRECISION research and what makes the study unique. As well, you will learn:

  • What was discovered from the study.
  • How the knowledge gained from the research will benefit people living with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriatic arthritis.
  • What pilot interventions were derived from the research.
  • The results of a survey of arthritis consumer viewpoints that ACE conducted in collaboration with the PRECISION project.
  • What medication adherence is and why it is important, in an interview with Dr. Mary De Vera.

Call for patient input on subcutaneous tocilizumab for rheumatoid arthritis

Call for patient input on subcutaneous tocilizumab (Actemra®) for rheumatoid arthritis

Do you have rheumatoid arthritis or care for someone who does? We need your valuable input.

Megaphone GraphicThe Common Drug Review (CDR) is currently welcoming patients and their caregivers to provide input on the manufacturer’s submission for subcutaneous (an injection under the skin) tocilizumab (Actemra®) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The intravenous form (or “IV”) of tocilizumab is approved by Health Canada for the treatment of adults with moderately-to-severely active rheumatoid arthritis who have failed to respond to an adequate trial of both DMARDs and a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha inhibitor. 

The CDR is part of the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). The CDR conducts objective, rigorous reviews of the clinical and cost effectiveness of drugs, and provides drug formulary recommendations to the publicly funded drug plans in Canada (except Quebec). 

To help them make their recommendations, the CDR accepts input from patient groups, like Arthritis Consumer Experts (ACE). Because patient input is vitally important to government decision-making about medications, we would like to gather your views and share them with the CDR. 

These are the questions they are asking:

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