JointHealth™ insight – numéro novembre 2018

Rapport spécial : l’arthrite dans la population active canadienne 

French JHI Slide
Dans le dernier numéro du JointHealth™ insight, le comité ACE (Arthritis Consumer Experts) livre un rapport sur l’arthrite chez la population active canadienne.

Au Canada, l’arthrite constitue la principale cause d’incapacité au travail, entraînant une piètre qualité de vie et des pertes d’emploi. Les membres ACE nous ont raconté leurs histoires émaillées d’efforts constants pour s’acquitter de leurs responsabilités au travail tout en gérant leur maladie, en particulier leurs symptômes tels que la douleur, la fatigue et la raideur, souvent accompagnés d’un déclin progressif des fonctions physiques.

Selon Statistique Canada, on estime à 13 milliards $ le coût annuel de l’incapacité de la population active due à l’arthrite et aux maladies musculosquelettiques. Les études ont démontré que plusieurs personnes ayant reçu un diagnostic de polyarthrite rhumatoïde (PR) sont contraintes de quitter la population active de façon prématurée et gagnent un salaire moins élevé que les personnes qui n’en sont pas atteintes.

Ce numéro du JointHealth™ insight couvre cet important sujet de l’arthrite au travail et traite également des sujets suivants :

  • Discussion sur les récipiendaires d’un prix Meilleurs milieux de travail au Canada pour les employés atteints d’arthrite : le Gouvernement du Yukon et l’Université de Montréal.
  • Regard sur l’impact de l’arthrite sur la population active au Canada et les défis les plus courants auxquels sont confrontés les employés qui en sont atteints.
  • Entrevue particulière avec Dre Lacaille à propos de son programme éducatif en ligne Making it Work™, conçu pour aider les personnes atteintes d’arthrite inflammatoire à gérer les défis liés à l’arthrite au travail.

JointHealth™ insight – November 2018

Special Report: Arthritis in the Canadian Workforce 

JHI Slide

 

In the latest issue of JointHealth™ insight, Arthritis Consumer Experts (ACE) reports on arthritis in the Canadian workforce.

Arthritis is the most common cause of work disability in Canada, resulting in both poor quality of life and workplace limitations. ACE members have told us about the challenge of managing workplace responsibilities while managing their disease, including symptoms such as pain, fatigue, and stiffness, often with a gradual loss of physical function.

According to Statistics Canada, the estimated annual cost of workplace disability from arthritis and musculoskeletal conditions is $13.6 billion. Studies have also shown that many people diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are forced to leave the workforce prematurely and earn less than those living without the disease.

This issue of JointHealth™ insight covers the important topic of arthritis in the workplace, and includes:

  • A discussion on the 2018 winners of Canada’s Best Workplaces for Employees Living with Arthritis award: The Government of Yukon and Université de Montréal.
  • A look at the impact of arthritis on the Canadian work force, and common challenges faced by employees with arthritis.
  • A special interview with Dr. Lacaille about her online education program, Making it Work™. The program is designed to help people with inflammatory arthritis deal with employment issues related to their disease.

Join Canadian Olympic snowboarder Spencer O’Brien and Dr. Diane Lacaille at the “Women in Biz Network: RA Matters at Work Event” on November 26

Picture of women at work

 

RSVP by November 23! Register for this free event to hear and learn from inspirational women living with arthritis and leading health professionals! 

Event date: November 26, 2018
Location:
The Westin Bayshore (Salon Ballroom D&E)
1601 Bayshore Drive,
Vancouver V6G 2V4
Free Registration: ramattersatwork.eventbrite.com
Please RSVP by November 23, 2018.

300,000 Canadians live with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and women are affected two to three times more often than men. For many people living with RA, career continuation and advancement can seem out of reach.

To help illuminate the accessibility of career progression for people with chronic diseases like RA, Women in Biz Network and Eli Lily Canada are launching a nationwide series of empowering events called RA Matters at Work.

Join them in an evening of lively discussion among a community of inspirational women living with arthritis. Speakers will share stories of difficulty and triumph while thriving in the workplace, and challenge the negative beliefs and self-doubt associated with living and working with a chronic disease.

Come learn from experts in rheumatology about advances in preventing work disability for people with inflammatory arthritis. The event will be moderated by ACE founder and president, Cheryl Koehn. Panelists include:

  • Dr. Diane Lacaille – Associate Scientific Director and Senior Research Scientist of Rheumatology, Arthritis Research Canada
  • Ms. Spencer O’Brien – Canadian Olympic Snowboarder, 2016 X Games Gold Medalist, 2 x World Champion, Olympian, person living with RA
  • Ms. Maya Joshi – Program coordinator, Arthritis Consumer Experts
  • Ms. Flora To-Miles – Managing Editor of Occupational Therapy Now, The Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists
  • Ms. Alison Stewart – Registered Rehabilitation Professional, Arthritis Research Canada Making It Work Research-Practice Program
  • Ms. Julia Chayko – Actor and Writer

Join us and the conversation at #RAMATTERSATWORK

Women in Biz Network: RA Matters at Work Event on November 26 in Vancouver, BC

Picture of women at work

 

Register for this free event to hear and learn from inspirational women living with arthritis and leading health professionals!

Event date: November 26, 2018, from 5:45 PM to 8:30 PM
Location:
The Westin Bayshore (Salon Ballroom D&E)
1601 Bayshore Drive,
Vancouver V6G 2V4
Free Registration: ramattersatwork.eventbrite.com

300,000 Canadians live with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and women are affected two to three times more often than men. For many people living with RA, career continuation and advancement can seem out of reach.

To help illuminate the accessibility of career progression for people with chronic diseases like RA, Women in Biz Network and Eli Lily Canada are launching a nationwide series of empowering events called RA Matters at Work.
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What is pain? What are EULAR’s guidelines for pain management?

Close up of a person's face wincing in painWhat is pain?

The International Association for the Study of Pain defines pain as “an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage”.

Pain is your body’s warning signal, letting you know that something is wrong in your body. When part of your body is injured or damaged, chemical signals are released that travel from nerve system cells (called neurons) to your brain where they are recognized as pain.

Most forms of pain can be divided into two general categories: Continue reading

Pain is one of the causes of arthritis-related fatigue

“I’m so tired”: arthritis and fatigue

For many people living with arthritis, “I’m so tired” is an often spoken phrase. Fatigue is their constant, very unpleasant companion. It is a symptom which is often overlooked or overshadowed by other concerns when treating arthritis, but it can be life-altering to people living with the disease.

Often, research into treatments for arthritis has focussed on other disease symptoms, sometimes leaving out the importance of managing fatigue. Some recent research, however, has focussed on fatigue, why it is harmful, and how it can be better treated.

In an article published in Clinical Care in the Rheumatic Diseases, Basia Belza and Kori Dewing examined fatigue in arthritis and described some strategies for dealing with fatigue and minimizing its impact.
A person who fell asleep on the couch and is covered in a blanketThis article cites other research to conclude that 80 – 100% of people living with certain types of inflammatory arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and fibromyalgia, live with fatigue. Most types of arthritis are associated with some fatigue, and it can be one of the most difficult symptoms to live with, and treat.

Fatigue has been defined as “usually or always being too tired to do what you want” (Wolf et al). For people living with extreme fatigue, completing even the simplest tasks, or participating in normal day to day activities, can feel nearly impossible. People who face fatigue as a symptom of their disease can simply feel “too tired” to do the things they want or need to do in their lives.

Causes of fatigue

There are several causes of arthritis-related fatigue, which very often occur together. Belza and Dewing note several causes of arthritis-related fatigue, including: Continue reading

November 14: Osteoarthritis Action Alliance Lunch and Learn Webinar

EQUIP-ing OA Patients and Health Care Providers Through Patient Engagement in Research with Marie Westby and Cheryl Koehn

The OA Action Alliance Lunch & Learn webinars keep you up-to-date on the latest osteoarthritis research, news and activities. This particular webinar will feature Marie Westby and Cheryl Koehn and will take place on November 14, 2018 at 12:00 pm ET. Webinars are free and open to the public. Webinars are archived on the events page on the OA Action Alliance’s website and on their YouTube channel in case you missed one or can’t get enough!

Please click here to register for the webinar. Osteoarthritis Action Alliance webinar

Marie Westby, PT, PhD is the Physical Therapy Teaching Supervisor in the Mary Pack Arthritis Program in Vancouver, BC and holds a Clinician Scientist position in the Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, Vancouver.
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Arthritis Research Canada is exploring the health benefits of everyday activities and needs your participation!

Researchers are recruiting individuals with and without inflammatory arthritis for a study that will explore the health benefits of everyday activities. While the main goal of this study is to explore the relationship between everyday activities and health outcomes of those with inflammatory arthritis, we are also asking people without arthritis to participate in order to determine how the relationship between everyday activities and health differs between groups. The research is conducted by a PhD trainee who is affiliated with Arthritis Research Canada and the University of British Columbia.
Clock image with daily activities icon
You are eligible if you:

  • Have inflammatory arthritis (with no other major health conditions) OR do not have inflammatory arthritis and are generally healthy
  • Are 19 years of age or older
  • Do not currently smoke

What’s involved?
Participants will attend a two-hour group session in British Columbia to fill out health and activity questionnaires, and provide blood samples using a pinprick blood test (five blood spots). Participants will receive a monetary honorarium in appreciation for their time, as well as reimbursement for any parking or transit expenses.

Why do this research?
Other than physical activity, there is little evidence regarding the types of activities or occupations that support living well with inflammatory arthritis. We aim to study the health benefits of people’s everyday activities, with an emphasis on social and creative characteristics of activities, among adults with and without inflammatory arthritis.

Interested? Have questions?
Contact Flora To-Miles
604.364.6223
fto-miles@arthritisresearch.ca

ACR News 3 – October 23, 2018

newspaper in mail slotACE is reporting from this week’s American College of Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals 2018 Annual Meeting. Here are some presentations that are important for arthritis patients.

The future of arthritis care and the next generation of arthritis specialists 

The Arthritis Alliance of Canada has looked carefully at how patients with arthritis receive timely diagnosis and treatment. Central to ensuring timely care is making sure there are adequate numbers of rheumatologists for making an early diagnosis and starting appropriate treatment. In 2015, the Canadian Rheumatology Association conducted a national workforce survey of rheumatologists across Canada. The survey found there is a current shortage of rheumatologists across the country that may worsen over the next 10 years because a third of the workforce reported plans to retire in the near future. This will occur at the same time as an expected increase in the number of arthritis patients within the next generation.
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ACR News 2 – October 22, 2018

newspaper in mail slotACE is attending this week’s American College of Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals 2018 Annual Meeting, the largest international gathering of arthritis researchers, clinicians, academics, patient advocates and arthritis health professionals. Here are some of today’s highlights:

Improving osteoarthritis management

There are currently more than 4.4 million Canadians living with osteoarthritis (OA). Within a generation (in 30 years), more than 10 million (or one in four) Canadians are expected to have OA. A 2017 study, “Productivity costs of work loss associated with osteoarthritis in Canada from 2010 to 2013,” found the rising rates of OA will cost the Canadian economy an estimated $17.5 billion a year in lost productivity by 2031 as the disease forces greater numbers of people to stop working or work less.

ACE and other members of the Arthritis Alliance of Canada have helped raise awareness with health care policy makers that OA is the leading cause of disability in older adults. One of Canada’s leading osteoarthritis researchers, Dr. Gillian Hawker, Sir John and Lady Eaton Professor and Chair of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto has stated: “the highest rates of OA are increasing fastest among young people (20-59 years), due largely to childhood obesity and knee injury. While effective therapies exist, the high prevalence of comorbidity in people with OA makes management challenging (as many of 90% of people with OA have at least one additional chronic condition – most often diabetes, heart disease and high blood pressure).”
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