All posts related to "arthritis"

On election day, how will you vote? The BC Election is scheduled for May 9.

The next general election in British Columbia is scheduled for May 9, 2017. What change would you want to see?

Arthritis affects 1 in 5 British Columbia residents, so healthcare to treat the more than 100 different types of the disease is extremely important to the more than 600,000 British Columbians living with the disease. Any party that wishes to become government needs to consider these constituents. To help the parties understand this, Arthritis Consumer Experts (ACE) sent a questionnaire to the candidates of the 2017 BC Provincial Election.

The questionnaire asked the following questions: Continue reading

It’s not your fault you are depressed…YOU are not making your RA worse

Woman with text It's not your fault you are depressedPeople living with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are twice as likely as the rest of the population to feel depressed. An important thing to understand is that it is NOT your fault you are depressed, therefore, YOU are not making your RA worse. It is natural to feel anxious or sad as a result of the diagnosis and to be depressed as a symptom of the disease. Instead, realise that it just demonstrates that rheumatoid arthritis is a complex condition that may require multiple levels of treatment; and, that an important strategy for reducing the pain of arthritis is treating your depression. Two approaches can be used, non-pharmacological and pharmacological, together or individually.

Separate from improving mood, antidepressants have been shown to reduce pain in many different chronic conditions, including arthritis, and they work even when depression is not a factor. How these drugs work to reduce pain is not fully understood, but may have to do with improving sleep, relaxing muscles, or increasing neurotransmitters in the spinal cord that are responsible for lessening pain signals.

Please consult your doctor to discuss your treatment options.

There are many strategies you can try, which you may find useful for helping you to avoid or alleviate depression without using drugs. No matter what suggestions you decide will work best for you, we recommend you speak with your doctor or therapist before getting started: Continue reading

Young generations reporting arthritis at an earlier age

Picture of youths in the park for arthritis articleA Canadian Study in Arthritis Care & Research concludes that young generations are reporting arthritis at an earlier age. The authors of the study believed it is linked to rising obesity rates.

The study looked at arthritis incidence in four different groups:

  • The World War II group (1935-1944) is the benchmark group.
  • The generation Xers (1965-1972), where the odds ratio for arthritis was 3.20.
  • The younger baby boomers (1955-1964), where the odds ratio for arthritis was 2.14.
  • The older baby boomers (1945-1954), where the odds ratio for arthritis was 1.48.

The study was conducted by Elizabeth Badley, PhD, of the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto, and her colleagues. Bailey and her team found that severely obese people were 2.5 times more likely than people with a normal body mass index (BMI). Continue reading

Adaptive clothes for people living with arthritis and other medical problems

Wardrobe full of clothesPutting on clothes can be a difficult task for people living with arthritis, limited mobility and range of motion, and other medical problems.

For someone living with arthritis, simple tasks, such as buttoning a shirt, tying shoelaces, or pulling up a zipper, are made difficult by joint pain and inflammation. Caregivers can help in this aspect but it can be a demeaning, intimate and tricky task for both parties. People with Alzheimer or dementia may also have trouble in dressing themselves. They may forget how to put on a shirt or which way the buttons face.

One way to make things easier is to use adaptive clothes. Adaptive clothes have details like Velcro tabs instead of zips and buttons, as well as adjustable or removable components that help to save time and reduce the risk of injury. “More importantly, this type of clothing improves one’s comfort and bolsters self-esteem,” said Ms. Punithamani Kandasamy, a registered nurse and caregiving trainer at Active Global Specialised Caregivers. In an interview with the Straight Times in Singapore, Ms. Punithamani explains how different types of adaptive apparel and footwear can be useful for both the wearer and the caregiver. Below is an excerpt from the interview: Continue reading

JointHealth™ insight – March 2017: Arthritis in the workplace

JointHealth™ insight – March 2017

Arthritis in the workplace: Are employers and employees speaking the same language? 

Arthritis in the workplace - two human cartoon talkingIn this issue of JointHealth™ insight, Arthritis Consumer Experts looks at the current state of arthritis in the workplace. Find out what makes the City of Ottawa and Aboriginal Peoples Television Network two of Canada’s best workplaces for employees living with arthritis.

In this issue, you will also find:

  • A summary on arthritis in the workplace, including the latest statistics about the cost of work disability
  • Suggestions on what kind of flexible work arragements would help workers with arthritis
  • Key messages for employers
  • Tips for employees living with arthritis

Call for participants – Making it work: Employment & Arthritis

Drawing of a desktop work spaceMaking it work: Employment & Arthritis 

Arthritis Research Canada is looking for participants to join a study on preventing work loss for people with osteoarthritis. 

Purpose of this study: The aim of this study is to develop an on-line eLearning self-management program to help people with osteoarthritis deal with employment issues and stay employed.

Who can participate?
Anyone from the province of British Columbia and Alberta.

To be eligible to participate in this study, you must:

  1. Be between the ages of 18 and 70 years;
  2. Have been told by a physician that you have osteoarthritis in either the hip, the knee, or your hands;
  3. Be currently employed OR having stopped working in the past 5 years;

What is involved? Continue reading