All posts related to "arthritis"

ACR News: New Treatment opportunities in axial spondyloarthritis

Picture of Dr. ElewautGood news for Arthritis Consumer Experts (ACE) members and subscribers who live with a form of ankylosing spondylitis. Within the arthritis research world, the field of ankylosing spondylitis is rapidly progressing, and very exciting new discoveries are being made. At the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) annual meeting, Dr. Dirk Elewaut, Professor of Rheumatology and Immunology and Chair of the Department of Rheumatology at Ghent University Hospital, Belgium, discussed the importance of gut inflammation in spondyloarthritis.

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ACR News: A more human(ities) approach to arthritis healthcare

Picture of a painting with flowers on itThe humanities come in many forms – literature, music, art, drama – and provide us perspective on what it means to be human. They can also provide benefits for patients and their healthcare professionals, said American College of Rheumatology (ACR) annual meeting keynote speaker, Dr. Paulette Hahn, Associate Professor of Medicine and Associate Vice Chair of Education in the Department of Medicine at the University of Florida.

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ACR News: Advances in psoriatic arthritis treatment and care

Picture of Dr. Laura CoatesNow that psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is viewed as its own disease entity and no longer as a relative of rheumatoid arthritis, trends in PsA care have started to change. Methotrexate has become a first-line treatment for PsA patients, and at the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) annual meeting this week, the spotlight was on new disease modifying antirheumatic agents (DMARDs) for PsA. According to Dr. Laura Coates, National Institute for Health Research Clinical Lecturer in Rheumatology at the University of Leeds, United Kingdom: “It is quite an exciting time for psoriatic arthritis because we are getting new drugs that are specific for PsA. A lot of the newer drugs focus on the Il-17 pathway, which is a different part of the patient’s immune system (than what previous medications targeted) and which seems to be particularly important for psoriatic arthritis, psoriasis, and spondylitis arthritis.”
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Chronic diseases decrease social participation in middle-age population

Three girls in front of a blue backgroundA recent study from McMaster University found that middle-aged adults living with a combination of arthritis, heart disease, diabetes, and/or depression are more likely to experience disability and limited involvement in society.

The research was conducted by Lauren Griffith, an associate professor in the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatics and the McLaughlin Foundation Professorship in Population and Public Health. Researchers from McMaster University published the study in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community HealthThey found that physical and mental chronic diseases, alone or in combination, were associated with disability and reduced social participation. The results differed by gender and age. Continue reading

Survival tools for a cold and damp winter for people living with arthritis

Arthritis can affect people all year round; however, the winter and wet weather months can make it harder to manage arthritis symptoms. Climate change can increase pain to joints.

According to Robert Jamison, Professor at the Harvard Medical School and chief psychologist at the Pain Management Center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Chestnut Hill, the increased pain is caused by a change in barometric pressure. Jamison explains the impact of barometric pressure on the body by comparing it to a balloon: “When a balloon is inflated, it has the maximum inside and outside pressure. High barometric pressure that pushes against the body from the outside keeps tissues from expanding. As the barometric pressure fails, tissues in the body may expand. As the tissues expand, they put more pressure on nerves that control pain signals.”

There are several ways to survive the cold. Firstly, take care of your own health by getting a flu vaccine. Health Canada states the following:

The best way to prevent the flu is by getting a flu vaccine, also known as a flu shot. Flu vaccine is safe and effective. You cannot get the flu from the flu vaccine. Most people do not have reactions to the flu vaccine. Severe reactions are rare.

Getting a flu vaccine is a simple action that can save lives by:

  • protecting you if you are exposed to the virus
  • preventing you from getting very sick
  • helping protect other people because you are less likely to spread the virus to others

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Social networking and disease management in arthritis

Effects of Social Networking on Chronic Disease Management in Arthritis

Do you have rheumatoid arthritis? Sign up for the Social Networking for Arthritis Patients (SNAP) study now.

SNAP BannerThe Social Networking for Arthritis Patients (SNAP) study is funded by The Rheumatology Research Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to research to improve the health of people with arthritis. Throughout the study, you will be having social interactions with patient representatives from The Arthritis Foundation, The International Foundation for Autoimmune Arthritis and The Arthritis Society. You may qualify for the study if you:

  • Are 18 years or older
  • Have been diagnosed by a doctor as having rheumatoid arthritis for 10 years or less
  • Have an email address
  • Able to communicate in English
  • Are comfortable with using the internet
  • Are familiar with social media
  • Live in the United States of America or Canada

Your participation would be online only and you will receive compensation for your time and effort. Your expected time commitment is 6 months. The participant will be asked to access webpages and complete online questionnaires at three time points.Do you have rheumatoid arthritis? Sign up for the Social Networking for Arthritis Patients (SNAP) study now.

This study is being conducted by investigators at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. To find out if you are eligible to participate, contact Jessica, research coordinator, at 1(713)563-8817 or email snaparthritis@gmail.com.